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Alan EmailAlan Beales Database of Fatalities in the Coal Fields

Emails - Page 9



Can you add to the Database – Is something wrong or missing? Please let me know.

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Helen - Looking for Abel Henstock.
John Henstock - Henstock Family Miners - My Great grandfather, Abel Henstock, died at the William Thorpe pit, 1926
Andrew Bradley - My Great, Great, Great, Great Grandfather Joseph Bradley Died at Grassmoor Colliery in 1856 aged 69
Marie Dickinson - My Gandfather Norman Fieldsend was Killed in Glapwell Colliery about 1943
Carol Cheshire - Albert Enoch Jones, Land Lord of the Railway Inn was injured at Langwith Colliery 1904
Jillian Williams - Charles Crann died at White Horse Colliery 30 Dec 1857 - Where was the mine?
Peter Gurd - Would Radford fatalities appear under Wollaton - Can you identify and locate High Holborn colliery?
Andrew Butler - Josephus Hackett died at Hickleton Main Colliery, Thurnscoe, South Yorkshire, on January 14th 1905

From:
Sent:
Subject:
Helen
27 Oct 2017
Abel Henstock

I have come across the name of Abel Henstock on your site having searched his name. He occupied some land that I have been wondering about for some time from the remaining archaeology, as to its former industrial and woodland usage. I am chair of a local heritage group and trying to find out more of the people who lived in that area. I was then fascinated to find that he had a mining background, which was part of the suspicion of how the land may have been used in the past (there are old tunnels). From a brass band background myself I was also interested in the banding history connection to miners. Do you by any chance have an email address for John Henstock as I would love to talk to him?

My grandfather was a miner and very political in his time regarding the accidents in the pits and the need for change. He was however lucky enough to be scouted as a conductor of brass bands (he played for Fodens at one stage and big bands of the era) which took him out of the mines and to a tannery that had a brass band (another potential use of this area of land as there is an old platform, thought to be for drying out the 'cords' of wood and the bark). In those days brass bands were used to keep workers out of pubs and to help improve production by social camaraderie and motivating of the workers. Brass bands and miners were very closely linked and part of generations of the same families and became the families themselves, just as in the film "Brassed Off".

Interestingly brass bands spread to different parts of the world around the same time as part of colonialism and today in Tonga you can still see bandsmen wearing this traditional sash, as worn by Abel Henstock in this photo. That remains an important part of today's uniform, as originating from European royalty and military usage (as well as earlier traditional celtic use), and giving the bandsmen a sense of pride and patriotism. That sense of belonging, the creation of loyalty and pride for the job being done, was perhaps the authoritarian way for those powerful landowners and colliery owners in managing and maintaining the workers against the tryany of poor management that lead inevitably and very sadly to so many deaths.

A great website and a tribute to those who served the cause of the industrial revolution and an important part of our country's history. It is good to honour these people similarly to the people honoured for loss of life in war. They did a dangerous service in peace times that was equally honourable and potentially avoidable and they must not be forgotten.

Helen


From:
Sent:
Subject:
John Henstock
27 October 2013
Henstock Family Miners - My Great grandfather, Abel Henstock, died at the William Thorpe pit, 1926

Dear sir

First, may I take this opportunity to thank for your site, as it has helped me in my family history researches.

There are in fact two incidents, the first is my Great grandfather, Abel Henstock, who died from an accident with the cage at the William Thorpe pit.  It might be useful for you to know that the events, investigation and funeral are described in the Derbyshire Times, Saturday 18th December 1926.  It also describes the family structure at the funeral. It is interesting to note that this picture is the same one that is in the Derbyshire Times.

The other aspect, which somebody might like to take up, is the uniform he is in, I believe it could be a colliery band uniform.  The report on his funeral indicates that he was a gifted bandsman and the report goes on to list the following bands he was associated with, Hardwick Colliery Band, Besses O'th Barn Band, Dannemora Band, Dinington Colliery Band, Maltby Band, Tibshelf Band, Old Clay Cross Volunteers, Chesterfield Comrades Band and Swanwick Collieries Band.  Which one it is and did he really get involved with all these bands, I have no idea.

The second is the death of his son-in law, Samuel Davison.  He married one of Abel's daughters from his second marriage, Emily. Sam was killed in a roof fall at Bolsover on the 5 Sept 1936; they had been married for three years.

Thank you

John Henstock


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Andrew Bradley
28 August 2013
My Great, Great, Great, Great Grandfather Joseph Bradley Died at Grassmoor Colliery in 1856 aged 69

Hello.

I am a Great, Great, Great, Great Grandson of Joseph Bradley who died in the shaft collapse at Grassmoor Colliery in 1856. I noticed on your website that it says he was 60 when he died; in fact he was born in 1787, making him 69 at the time. I thought you would like this more accurate information. If you have any further information on the accident I would be very grateful for this.

Thank you.

Andrew Bradley

Hi Andrew, Fionn has sent me your e mail. On the HMI annual report 1856 it gives J Bradley 60, and W Fletcher 25, killed by a fall of earth in a sinking shaft Grassmoor 13-12-1856. That is where I got the detail. If you are still in the area try Chesterfield Library there may be an inquest report in the Derbyshire Times, or if you cannot get, phone the library they are usually very helpful. The same detail is on Coalmining resource  centre On Line
All the best in your search
A Beales


Thank you for updating me on the situation regarding Joseph Bradley being aged 69.

I have information as you found, that I assumed maybe wrongly attributed, that he was one of the two sinkers killed in 1846 which would make him 60 years old. However if he was born in 1787 then that would be correct. However if he was 69 then he was killed in another sinkingthat I have found reference to and that started in 1852 and that it would still be sinking in 1856. Sometimes these shafts did take several years to sink due to as stated bad ground whilst other generally only took about 2 years. It is possible that I misinterpreted the info years ago (as you see I have been writing this for over 50 years). The bad ground could be problems with water that is why it took longer to sink. They had to get rid of the water that would flood the shaft and that was very difficult as sometimes there were no pumps only primitive ones and it was raised using large buckets or kibble or whatever. This obviously took a great deal of time because sinking through the water-bearing measures the water influx  would never stop and could have been several hundreds of gallons a minute.  You might say that the water bearing strata was not too deep therefore many kibbles full could be raised fairly quickly. I don't know. There is a photo showing boarding being pinned round the shaft and joined up as per a Cooper making a beer barrel. One description stated that to stop the water coming in they used sheep's fleeces and wedged them in. Brickwork was built as a circle around this and the shaft sizes were obviously less diameter than the original excavation and the earlier ones were only about 10 feet (3.3m) finished internal diameter. This was called tubbing.  At some shafts they used cast iron tubbing bolted together in sections forming a circle. I have no evidence of this yet but I am continually researching.

Only this week I found lots of information about some Butterley Co pits at the Archives at Matlock so it is possible I may find some more for Grassmoor in the future.  It is a huge task as you will appreciate but I do persevere as you can see. There were eventually 12 shafts at Grassmoor and I think the last one was in 1878. However he was obviously working at the bottom of the sinking of an earlier shaft when there was a fall and I have no evidence of this at present that the shaft side higher up above them did collapse on him and the other sinker. However this a possibility. Of course the other one is that he was attempting to support the side of the shaft at the bottom with his mate when the side gave way and buried or fell on them. Working in that water under terrible conditions must have been hell. However he managed up to his seventieth year doing extremey difficult and hard work and obviously dangerous but he no doubt only wore a flat cap (no protection) moleskin trousers etc or oilskins and a Sou'wester whist sinking through the water. He could well have been a very experienced sinker travelling round from one Company to another possibly from his early 20s. Unfortunately these people were rarely mentioned by name and sometimes even when killed as shown above. The Mines Inspectorate were only just starting and they rarely went to an accident unless there were ten or more killed..............
 
I hope this gives you an insight and answers to your query.

Bob Bradley


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Marie Dickinson.  Great-granddaughter
11 October 2013
My Gandfather Norman Fieldsend was Killed in Glapwell Colliery about 1943

My grandfather Norman Fieldsend was a very proud miner in Derbyshire working in the Glapwell, Bolsover area.  He  lost his life in about 1943 in a Pit accident in Glapwell, Roof fall. 

My grandmother was given £100 for his life as the pit owners suggested that he should have checked the pit props. My grandmother claimed that the pit just didn't want to 'pay out'. I would be interested to find more information about this. Do you have any?

Marie Dickinson, Great-granddaughter

Sent from my iPad

No Information yet but there was a Pharaoh Fieldsend, possibly an ancester, he was aged 38 when he died at Glapwell (Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Co Ltd) 14 Dec 1897. He was a stallman and was killed by a roof fall. Pharaoh and another man were removing slack from the floor for the purpose of setting timber under the roof and between two slips when the roof fell and fatally injured the deceased. He died the same day. The other man was seriously injured.


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Carol Cheshire
 8 October 2013
Albert Enoch Jones, Land Lord of the Railway Inn was injured at Langwith Colliery 1904

Hi I wonder if you can help me please?

I am researching a pub called the Railway Inn in Swadlincote. A former landlord was an Albert Enoch Jones from 1910-33. According to a newspaper article when he died he was involved in an accident at Langwith Colliery in 1904 which resulted in him having a leg amputated but I cannot find any details of this accident. you have a couple listed on here for 1904 but his name isn’t mentioned.

Carol Cheshire


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Jillian Williams
 6 October 2013
Charles Crann died at White Horse Colliery 30 Dec 1857 - Where was the mine?

Hi

Can you tell me more about this accident.  I am researching Charles Crann who died in the above Colliery on Harehill lane.  I would like to know where this mine was can you point me in the right direction for a map. Do you have anymore information on this disaster.  It was on the 30th Dec 1857.

Regards

Jillian Williams
CRANN  ONS
New Zealand


Charles Crann, age 17, and Joseph Garside age 30, died after a boiler burst 29 Dec 1875 at White Horse Colliery, owned by Messrs Garsides of Leeds, Yorkshire. Charles actually died on the following day, the 30th Dec.

Harehills Lane leads down to York Road, the red ’A’ marks the White Horse pub.

The White Horse, 364 York Rd, Leeds LS9 9DN


White Horse colliery -  Information from abandonment plans, unfortunately very little information on them, very poor plans - Garside colliery adjacent.
James Brown estate...10 acres 2 roods 26 poles of Crow coal (Better bed) worked 1870-1877. A pillar was left to protect Broomhill House.

Another reference in Township of Potternewton - Harehill Lane...Rock bed coal worked - Earl Cowper ... abandoned Aug 1858.  George H Bond (Chesterfield) was the Surveyor.
This would be the colliery as the date for 30 Dec 1857 ties in, however that is all I could find.

Bob Bradley


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Peter Gurd
24 September 2013
Would Radford fatalities appear under Wollaton - Can you identify and locate High Holborn colliery?

Alan - many thanks for a very useful resource. Just a couple of questions:
1) Am I correct in thinking Radford fatalities would appear under Wollaton?
2) Can you identify and locate High Holborn colliery which seems to have been owned by Cossall Colliery Co but had no workers?

Thanks in advance if you're able to help. We're trying to put together a history of the Middleton Estate collieries.

Kind regards, Peter Gurd (Wollaton Historical Society).


High Holborn pit in Cossall. Thomas North worked Deep Soft and Deep Hard. Shaft depth 130 yards (119m).
It was sunk about 1838 and discontinued working in 1848 and abandoned in 1850.

Bob Bradley


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Andrew Butler
23 September 2013
Josephus Hackett died at Hickleton Main Colliery, Thurnscoe, South Yorkshire, 14 Jan 1905

Hi,

I hope you'll be able to help with any information about my Gt Gt Grandfather Josephus Hackett, who I believe was killed in a mine accident at Hickleton Main Colliery, Thurnscoe, South Yorkshire, on January 14th 1905.

I've visited the cemetery at Thurnscoe and found his grave and those of his daughter-in-law (unmarked) and Granddaughter (unmarked).

Any information about him or his family would be gratefully received.

Andrew Butler



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