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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Chimneys

1966
1968
1970

1968 - Page   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12  

1968 - Page 2



Clifton Colliery, Nottingham (South Nottinghamshire)
Was Closed After 100 Years
Clifton colliery, Nottingham (South Nottinghamshire)sunk within 60 yards (55m) of the River Trent in 1868-1870 by Saul Isaacs (Clifton Colliery Co) near the village of Wilford and leased from HR Clifton Esq, was closed in July 1968 after 100 years. It was rumoured that Sir Robert Clifton sank the colliery to pay off gambling debts, and as landowner he stood to make huge profits from the leases and royalties.
In 1935 the name of the company was changed to Nottingham and Clifton Colliery Co Ltd. 2 shafts DC 14ft dia (4.27m) and UC 13ft (3.96m) were sunk 12 yards (11m) apart.

The pit top was only 82’ 0” (25m) above sea level and only a few feet (metres) above the River Trent. Position E456515 N337985.

The Permo Trias measures were 157’ 5” (48m) thick to the top of the coal measures.

  • Coal 2’ 8” (0.81m) at 181’ 6” (55.3m)
  • Comb coal 6” (0.15m)
  • Dirt 11” (0.28m)
  • Coal 8” (0.20m) at 202’ 8” (61.8m)
  • Top Hard 5’ 10½“ (1.80m) at 210’ 5” (64.1m)
  • Dunsil 3’ 0” (0.91) at 283’ 0” (86.3m)
  • 1st Waterloo 3’ 3” (1.0m) at 310’ 4” (94.6m), 8 beds of coal
  • Deep Soft 5’ 0” (1.52m) at 722’ 6” (220.2m), 1 thin seam
  • Deep Hard 5’ 7½“ (1.71m) at 765’ 0” (233m)
  • 1st Piper 3’ 4” (1.02m) at 804’ 10” (245.3m)
  • 2nd Piper coal and dirt 2’ 3½“ (0.70m) at 843’ 4½“ (258.3m), 1 thin bed of coal
  • Tupton 2’ 10½“ (0.88m) at 891’ 0” (271.5m)
  • Threequarters coal and dirt 1’ 2” (0.36m), sump at 901’ 5” (274.75m).

In 1942 the Ministry of Fuel and Power assumed complete ownership as the pit was in a terrible condition.

In 1943 a modernisation scheme and essential repairs was started with the idea to improve output figures to 2,000 tons a day.

Pithead baths were opened in 1954/55.

Roof bolting with straps were tried on 4s district in 1954.

A cable belt was installed in 1959 along with a new loading point.

A Sutcliffe 125 ton static bunker was operational in 1960.

A ski lift type manrider was installed in 1961 as shown to the right.


Seams Worked

  • Deep Soft -16/6/1952, abandoned 1953
  • Deep Hard 1870s -15/6/1967
  • Piper 1934 -28/7/1967
  • Tupton 2’ 11” (0.89m) 1928 -5/10/1952 and 1964-1968.

Highest output pre-nationalisation was 351,395 tons in 1923 produced by 1,422 men and boys.
Highest manpower was 1,544 in 1927.

800 men were employed and most of the output went direct to the nearby Wilford power station.

In the final year the seam quality had deteriorated and material and labour costs had risen.

Tonnage and Manpower: Saul Isaacs 1867-1876, Clifton Colliery Co Ltd - 1936
Nottingham and Clifton Colliery Co Ltd -1942, Ministry of Fuel and Power - 1946

  • 1894: Deep Hard and Deep Soft 731, s/f 185, total 916 men
  • 1895: 896 men
  • 1900: 950 men
  • 1903: 1,031 men
  • 1905: 872 men
  • 1911: 794 men
  • 1913: 887 men
  • 1914: 284,903 tons, 935 men
  • 1915: 294,545 tons, 964 men
  • 1916: 283,865 tons, (279½ days worked)
  • 1917: 284,185 tons
  • 1918: 265,037 tons, 945 men (302 days worked)
  • 1919: 307,675 tons (255¾ days worked)
  • 1920: 346,237 tons 1,029 u/g, 437 s/f, total 1,466 men
  • 1921: 242,060 tons, 1,472 men (187 days worked)
  • 1922: 329,986 tons 1,376 men (247 days worked) £125,837 15s 4d (£125,837.76½p)
  • 1923: 351,395 tons, 1,451 men (274 days worked)
  • 1924: 310,691 tons, (221 days worked)
  • 1925: 265,075 tons, 1,395 men (202 days worked)
  • 1926: 218,861 tons,1,235 u/g, 310 s/f, total 1,545 men (max) 1,365 during strike, (125 days worked)
  • 1927: 273,682 tons, 1,544 -1,447 men
  • 1928: 264,508 tons, 1,238 men
  • 1929: 294,381 tons, 1,137 men + 25 clerks etc
  • 1930: 260,230 tons, 1,004 men (131 days worked)
  • 1931: 256,625 tons, 962 men (169½ days worked)
  • 1932: 235,153 tons, 971 men
  • 1933: 209,117 tons, 969- 930 men
  • 1934: 205,211 tons, 671 men
  • 1935: Deep Hard and Piper, 140,304 tons, 676 - 648 men
  • 1936: 163,003 tons, 587 men
  • 1937: 152,604 tons, 537 men
  • 1938: 151,958 tons, 581 men + 21 clerks
  • 1940: Deep Soft, Deep Hard and Piper, 484 men
  • 1941: 135,928 tons, 460 men + 16 clerks

Ministry of Fuel and Power

  • 1943: 145,006 tons, 588 men (wages bill £184,106)
  • 1944: 181,072 tons, 709 men + 15 clerks
  • 1945: Deep Soft, Piper and Low Main 199,285 tons, 533, s/f 163, total 696 men
  • 1946: 254,534 tons, 355 face men, 320 elsewhere below ground and 175 men on the surface giving a total of 850 in Jan and 899 men and boys plus 25 clerks at nationalisation, wages bill £275,881.13s.4d (£275,881.66½p).

Tonnage and Manpower NCB: No6 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 279,779 tons, 948 men
  • 1948: 320,836 tons, 969 men
  • 1949: 331,108 tons, 974 men
  • 1950: 347,537 tons, 920 men
  • 1951: 345,710 tons, 931 men
  • 1952: 345,149 tons, 915 men
  • 1953: 393,987 tons, 980 men
  • 1954: 412,738 tons, 1,022 men
  • 1955: 378,997 tons, 1,066 men
  • 1956: 376,393 tons, 1,084 men
  • 1957: 415,081 tons, 1,141 men
  • 1958: 427,694 tons, 1,094 men
  • 1959: 435,926 tons, 996 men
  • 1960: 473,236 tons, 878 men
  • 1961: 484,498 tons, 838 men
  • 1962: 569,824 tons, 833 men
  • 1963: 558,075 tons, 831 men
  • 1963/64: 503,835 tons, 831 men
  • 1964/65: 518,376 tons, 816 men
  • 1965/66: 581,684 tons, 793 men
  • 1966/67: 584,004 tons (maximum), 831 men
South Nottinghamshire
  • 1967/68: 470,277 tons, 829 men
  • 1968/69: 91,646 tons, 311 men.

Colliery closed July 1968.

The old pit bottom is shown in the photo to the right.


Agents:
  • Henry Fisher pre 1887-1902
  • William E Walker Agent 1905-1922
  • A Beeston (2699) Agent 1922-1928
  • William Claytor (511) Agent 1928-1935
  • RH Swallow (2557) Agent 1939-1942
  • JT Dixon (1737) Agent 1942-1943, to General Manager of the Co
  • MH Young Agent from 15th Jan 1945-1946
  • Major FMT Bunney (2760) Agent 1947-1951

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers:

  • MH Young Sub-Area Manager 1952
  • Charlie Round (2996) Sub-Area Manager 1953-
  • Arthur Walmsley Group Manager 1956-
  • Stan Chadwick (3747) Group Manager 1964-

Managers for Clifton:

  • Henry Fisher and Agent (No 9 Service Certificate) pre 1887-1902
  • William E Walker (2043) 1903-1905
  • WCA Collin (2678) 1905-1907
  • A Beeston (2699) 1908-1922
  • Thos Wright (1047) 1922-1927
  • GA Sellars (226) Manager 1927-1928
  • L Smithurst (618) 1928-1932
  • JE Tredgold (497) 1932-1934
  • James Dolan (1492) 1934-1935
  • Spencer Hughes (531) 1935-1936
  • Roby H Parkin (1213) 1936-1937

The last pit pony ‘Captain’ arrives at the surface
as the pit is closed in 1968.

Nottingham and Clifton Colliery Ltd:

  • TH Breed (509) 1937-1938
  • William Morrell (2577) 1939-1940
  • A Grimes (409) 1940-1941
  • William Morrell (2577) 1941-1952
  • Len C Hogg (3275) 1952-1953 (transferred to Bestwood)
  • Russell Bracegirdle (3202) Manager 1953-1956 (promoted from Wollaton, left to Gullick)
  • Wilf Knight (5224) Manager 1956-1963
  • Wilf Clements Manager (5817) Agent Manager 1963-1968.
Deputy Managers:
  • Ken J Simmons (6132) 1963-1966 (transferred to Cotgrave)
  • Tom A Rainford, (8679) 1966-1968 (transferred to Cotgrave also).

Assistant Managers:

  • Ken Butt (4675) 1958 - (later Agent Manager Cotgrave).

Undermanagers for Clifton:

  • G Chambers pre 1887-1888
  • Thos Severn 1889-1902
  • A Clifford (2nd) 1903-1923
  • No Undermanager 1924-1928
  • William Stewart (2nd) 1928-1931
  • JE Tredgold (497) 1931-1932 (promoted to Manager)
  • Luther Wright (2nd) 1932-1933
  • No Undermanager
  • WG Barnett (2nd) 1935-1936
  • F Brown (2nd) 1937
  • S Taylor (2nd) 1938-1939
  • William Morrell (2577) 1940-1941 (demoted from Manager promoted back to Manager)
  • R Mottershead (2nd) 1942-1943
  • FN Limb (2nd) 1943-1952 (transferred to Gedling)
  • Frank Dunn (5647) 1952-1955 (later Manager Linby)
  • G Crellin (2nd) 1956-1958
  • Ken J Simmons (6132) 1958-1963 (promoted to Deputy Manager)
  • Dennis W Ward (7402) 1963-1968 (transferred to Gedling)
Surveyors included:
  • Peter Spurrier (….) (ex Bevin boy, later Chief Mining Engineer for West Riding of Yorkshire) 1947- 1950
  • Lewis Harold Spencer (517) (No6 Area Chief Surveyor) 1947-
  • Roy Wheatcroft (3120) (transferred to Bestwood) 1960-1965
  • Peter Carter (4057) 1965-1968.

Fatal Accidents Clifton

  • 26-Mar-1870 William Straton (39) sinker, fell from a platform down the shaft and drowned d 5-Apr-1870
  • Robert Mitchell (48) fall of coal 28-Jun-1883
  • George Hurt (38) fall of roof 12-Aug-1873
  • Enock Spurr (..?) and Patrick Mannix (65) 14-Dec-1873
  • Joseph Clayton (18) fall in a roadway 2-May-1874
  • Arthur Clements (23), coals fell, 16-Mar-1874, died 4-May-1874
  • William Weston (17), whilst closing a ventilation door which was ajar, it fell on his leg, died in hospital 15-May-1874
  • Thomas Booth (14) hit by a closing door 10-Aug-1874
  • John Twell (50) and son William Twell (30) were killed on 30-May-1874 when the cage went down the shaft
  • William Mossell (16) was putting a fuse to a cartridge of powder when a spark from his lamp flew a distance of 4 feet (1.22m) into the cartridge and caused it to explode 11-Dec-1874
  • Thomas Fox (46), coal caster, crushed under a hoist, fatal 18-Jan-1875
  • William Hyson (46) fall of roof 19-Dec-1875
  • James Lakin (43), No2 Soft Coal stall, rock fell, 27-Oct-1876, fatal 14-Nov-1876
  • George Morrell (45) fall of coal 5-Feb-1883
  • Thos Reynolds (26), stallman, coals fell, fatal 12-Mar-1885
  • Aaron John Wood (23), knocked down by loaded tram, fatal 17-Apr-1885
  • Thos Sisson (37), holing in No5 Soft Coal, coal fell, fatal 21-May-1887
  • William Clark (17), horse jammed him against a tram, 23-Jan-1890, fatal injuries 2-Apr-1890
  • Thos Roberts (49), crushed by horse against a ventilation door, fatal injuries 23-Jan-1891
  • William J Ward (32), fall of rock in main return airway, fatal 11-Nov-1891
  • Fred Seares (16), bind fell on him in 38s Hard Coal gate, 16-Nov-1892, died 27-Nov-1892
  • Henry Smith (35), Deputy, pinned by fall of roof, 1-Feb-1894, died 7-Feb-1894
  • Harry Merrington (17) run over by tubs 7-Dec-1897
  • Joseph Spencer (15) run over by tubs 9-Oct-1898
  • Thomas Flint (27) crushed by wagons on the surface 27-Mar-1899
  • Enoch Shakespeare (56) fall of roof 17-Aug-1899
  • William Patchett (22) caught in machinery 14-Dec-1899
  • John Hallam (16) run over by tubs 5-Feb-1900
  • Edward Voce (17) crushed by tubs 19-Nov-1900, died 22-Nov-1900
  • Reuben Storer (58) fall of roof 22-Aug-1901
  • Arthur Adcock Price (16) run over by tubs 8-Oct-1901
  • Thomas Burrows (62) injured his leg 19-Feb-1902, died from pleurisy 28-Feb-1902
  • Francis Purdy (58) fall of roof 21-Jun-1904
  • Arthur Hargreave (13) crushed by tubs 19-Aug-1904, died 20-Aug-1904
  • Esau Perry (46) fall of roof 24-Feb-1905
  • Henry Smith (29) fall of coal 20-Nov-1905
  • John Smith (39) fall of coal 19-Jun-1907
  • Ben Bragg (25) fall of coal 24-Jun-1907
  • Thomas Slack (30) caught in machinery 24-Jun-1908
  • William Henry Paling (13) run over by tubs 1-Jan-1909
  • John Dickens (54) of Wilford Village, heart attack, died at Clifton Colliery on 2-April 1909    
  • Charles Arthur Dawson (25) fall of coal 6-May-1909
  • Daniel Inman Eyre (36) and Samuel Higgs (36) both electrocuted 28-Jun-1909
  • William Cragg (55) crushed by tubs 19-Apr-1911
  • Arthur William James (40) fall of 8-Feb-1912
  • Thomas Hill (35), coal cutter operator, fall of roof 24-Nov-1913
  • John Woodford Steele (14), pony driver, coal fell on him from tram, 22-Sep-1914, died from lumbar pneumonia 27-Jan-1915, £30 compensation paid
  • Amos Roome (20), loader, fall at ripping lip, 23-Feb-1915
  • Henry Lomas (38), loader, bind fell, 1-Nov-1915, died in the Asylum 21-Sep-1917
  • Edwin S Carrington (69), day wage man, fall at rip, fatal 2-Dec-1915
  • William Warwick (59), No9 Soft coal Junction, 12s District, stone fell, 15-Mar-1916, died 16-Mar-1916
  • Richard Garton (53), stallman 10s Hard Coal, coal burst off 9-Jan-1917, died 17-Jan-1917
  • John George Lane (35), 89s Hard coal, bump in roof, fall 15-May-1917
  • John Morris Ellingworth (15), pony driver, trapped under ripping lip by tram, fatal 23-Aug-1917
  • Levi Eggleshaw (44) fall of roof 8-Mar-1918, died from endothelioma
  • John Sunderland (19) crushed by tubs --Apr-1916, died 14-Sep-1918
  • William Clarke (53) crushed by tubs 7-Dec-1920
  • John Archer (16) fall of roof 10-Jan-1921
  • George Andrews (34) fall of roof 15-Jan-1921
  • Isaac Poyser (60) fall of roof 9-Dec-1921
  • Frederick Bernard Pears (19) fall of roof 1-Aug-1922
  • William Saul Mayfield (48) fall of roof 10-Feb-1922, died from septic bladder 7-Aug-1922
  • George Sellars (66) fall of roof 6-Mar-1923
  • George Spencer (16) crushed by wagons on the surface 6-Feb-1925
  • George Hunter (35) fall of roof 10-Feb-1926
  • George Bucknall (13) buried by fall of dirt whilst outcropping (coal picking) on the pit tip 24-Jul-1926
  • Frederick Jesse Rowland (50) fall of roof 13-Oct-1926
  • Charles Eldred Arthur (53) caught in machinery 21-Nov-1927
  • George Edward Smalley (32) all of coal 27-Jun-1928
  • Robert Harvey (34) fall of roof 28-Jun-1928
  • John Tomlinson (57) fall of roof 2-Nov-1928
  • Thomas Wileman (61) caught in a coal cutter 2-May-1919, died 29-May-1929
  • Ben Curzon Haywood (47) fall of roof 13-Dec-1929
  • Thomas Herbert Lane (26) fall of roof 30-Dec-1929
  • Fred Arthur Longden (45) fall of roof 14-Mar-1930
  • Joseph Busby (35) fall of roof 1-Jul-1930
  • John Ellinor (54) run over by wagons on the surface 28-Apr-1933
  • George Bainbridge (50) fall of roof 5-Jan-1934, died 3-Feb-1934
  • Herbert Edward Lockley (27) run over by tubs 24-Jun-1935
  • Louis Dixie (30) crushed by tubs 23-Dec-1936
  • Harry Bartles (40) fall of coal 1932, died from toxaemia 16-Nov-1938
  • George Pearson (35) electrocuted 6-May-1941
  • William Hodgkiss (28) fall of roof 1-Mar-1942
  • George William Taylor (45) fall of roof 18-Apr-1942
  • Michael Moore (50) fall of roof 7-Jan-1944, died --Sep-1944
  • Richard Padden Purdy (44) shotfiring accident 20-Jun-1945, died 29-Jun-1945
  • Arthur Walters (38) caught in a coal cutter 18-Jul-1945
  • Ernest Fletcher (39) fall of roof 7-Dec-1945
  • Robert Swinscoe (21) fall of roof 22-May-1947, died 30-May-1947
  • George Edward England (39) fall of roof 22-Feb-1948, died 4-May-1948
  • Cyril Allen (35) fall of roof 17-Aug-1949
  • Charles Edwin Parker or Parkes (60) fall of roof 13-Feb-1950
  • Raymond Jesse Mountford (27) fall of roof 13-Feb-1950
  • Edward Lee (30) fall of roof 15-Jul-1952
  • John Richard McTernan (30) fall of roof 9-Jul-1954
  • William Charles Stanley (31) crushed by tubs 31-Jan-1955
  • Frank Wallace (33) Caught in a conveyor 10-Dec-1955
  • William Drew (38) caught in a coal cutter 5-Nov-1961

Numerous other accidents occurred from simple cuts and bruises to hands and body, to being kicked by a horse, slipping on steel plates, dogging on and catching hand in draw bar, tub off the road, falling and stumbling, straining lifting heavy material etc etc.

Only very serious or fatal accidents were reported to the Mines Inspector. Many other accidents such as a horse shaft breaking and trapping a ganger, tram off road trapping a haulage lad, horse knocking someone down, horse kicking someone, sprags taken out and coals falling burying someone, dogging on and hand smashed in draw bar, cage lowered onto an onsetter, slipped on spin plate, fell down dips etc although serious to the person and time had to be taken off work, were not termed serious enough, and claims for compensation would be thrown out by stating that it was the workman’s fault.


Clipstone Panel Taken Over By Rufford

A connection was made from Rufford to Clipstone in the Low Main horizon and from 5th July 1968, 29s panel at Clipstone was taken over and continued by Rufford management (North Nottinghamshire). This was an unusual occurrence but I think it was due to bad gate conditions at the Clipstone end and it was more efficient to work it from the Rufford mine.


Ireland

Ireland colliery (North Derbyshire) developed the First Piper seam as the Deep Hard reserves came to an end.


Babbington Output

Babbington (South Nottinghamshire) had its highest ever output in 1967-1968 with 864,021 tons produced by 1,423 men at an overall output per manshift of 53.2 cwts.


1 Million Tons

The combined mines at Markham produced the first 1 million tons. Glapwell produced its third and final 1million tons in the year with 1,870 men (North Derbyshire).


Bolsover Winder

Bolsover No3 shaft (North Derbyshire) steam winder was converted to electric.


Bevercotes In Trouble Again

Bevercotes (North Nottinghamshire) hit production problems again with major faulting. All production was stopped and it was decided to ‘block out’ the Parkgate seam by driving headings to prove the faulting, and commence production afterwards using the Z system of panel work, i.e. where the Loader gate is pre-driven and is retreated whilst the tail gate is advanced and ripped. Crude oil continued to seep into the workings, hampering production, and had to be collected in tanks for BP, the owners of the oil. I remember on a visit there to one of those panels how horrible the gooey oil was. It smelled awful and it stuck to your boots and clothes and was difficult to wash off your hands. I went through the panel with Ray Flint the Undermanager an ex Senior Overman at Ollerton when I first went there. He was to return to Ollerton later but as an Assistant Undermanager.


Dowty Meco

Dowty Meco was formed in 1968 when Dowty acquired Meco Mining Engineering (1908) in Worcester, the firm that had developed compressed air shaker conveyors in the early 1910s and the Meco-Moore cutter-loader a major machine developed in the 1930s and put to use in 1942 at Clipstone, Rufford, and later at Ollerton, Bilsthorpe, Silver Hill etc in the late 1940s. The first scraper chain had been developed in 1944.


Old Shafts

During 1968-1969 measurements were taken by me (Senior Assistant Surveyor Teversal) down to the water level at several old shafts in the Meden Valley. At Molyneux it was 23 feet 10 inches (7.26m); at Skegby Wharf Old it was 55 feet 10½ inches (17m); Skegby Wharf New 56 feet 3 inches (17.15m) and at Coopers shaft 74 feet (22.55m), which was drawing water for the Silverhill washery plant. Previous measurements to water levels were taken in 1928 by Frank England (Assistant Surveyor) and staff from Teversal survey office. At Molyneux 22 feet 5 inches (6.8m). At Skegby Wharf Old 63 feet (19.2m); Skegby Wharf New 57 feet (17.4m).

 

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Pit Terminology - Glossary