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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Chimneys

1966
1968
1970

1968 - Page   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12  

1968 - Page 12


Nailstone Colliery (Leicestershire) Was Closed After 104 years

Illustration fromThe Colliery Guardianof 13 January 1899 showing early headgear
At Nailstone Colliery, Leicestershire.

Nailstone (Leicestershire) sunk by WH Wilks in 1864 to the west of Bagworth and the south of Ellistown was closed in October 1968.
No1
shaft position 43/4208/930522, 167 yards (152.75m), No2 43/4208/933530, 217 yards (198.5m). The colliery was bought by Joseph J Ellis in 1867 and by Joseph Thornton in 1876. The colliery was sold again in 1883 this time to W Fitz Hall. On his death the colliery was bought by Nailstone Colliery Co. Nailstone was merged with Bagworth in 1968.
As was the case in those days the tandem headstocks were constructed of pitch pine wood with open shaft tops.
Pit head baths were built 1953-1954.
A surface drift was driven in 1956.
A system of Dowty bolts for forward lip support was tried in 1959.
New screens were built in 1960.
There was both a Sentinel diesel and a Bagnall 0-4-0 steam loco doing shunting operations on the surface in 1960.
Stables on faces were eliminated in 1967.
Closed circuit TV was introduced in 1986.
A roadway was driven from Bagworth to Nailstone in the Five Feet and Splent seams and a roadway in the lower seams was driven up to Bagworth which thirled in 1966 so that the coal could be transported that way and in 1967 coal winding by skip finished.
The photo shows gangers underground at Nailstone in the 1930s.
Seams worked:

  • Upper Main 6’ 0” (1.83m) 1865/66 -finished Oct 1940
  • High Main fireclay, coal 2’ 0” (0.61m), fireclay 31/7/1965
  • Middle Lount 4’ 8” (1.42m) 22/1/1965 and 27/10/1967
  • Nether Lount 3’ 0” (0.91m) coal, 1’ 0” (0.30m) dirt. 4’ 0” (1.22m) coal 18/11/1967
  • Yard seam 3’ 9” (1.13m), 10/11/1964 and 5/10/1968
  • Lower Main seam 7’ 6” (2.29m) 1865 – 7/10/1964 and abandoned 5/10/1968

Manpower: from

  • 1894: 243 Upper Main and Lower Main, 68 surface
  • 1895: 272 UM, LM, 72 s/f
  • 1896: 263 UM, LM, 73 s/f
  • 1897: No1: 168 UM, 30 s/f, No2: 153 LM, 52 s/f
  • 1898: 183 UM, 35 s/f, 189 LM, 53 s/f
  • 1899: 166 UM, 34 s/f, 192 LM, 51 s/f
  • 1900: 178 UM, 38 s/f, 204 LM, 52 s/f
  • 1905: 197 UM, 53 s/f, 229 LM, 28 s/f
  • 1909: 190 UM 85 s/f, 247 LM, 83 s/f
  • 1912: 328 UM, 29 s/f, 292 LM, 129 s/f
  • 1914: 321 Upper Main, 324 Lower Main and Seven Feet, 161 s/f
  • 1917: 373 UM, 370 LM, 165 s/f
  • 1921: 369 UM and fireclay, 393 LM, 183 s/f
  • 1923: 356 UM, 369 LM and Seven Foot, 167 s/f
  • 1924: 702 UM (Top, Middle and Bottom), Lower Main and fireclay, 153 s/f
  • 1926: 661 UM, LM, 151 s/f
  • 1927: 549 UM, LM, 144 s/f
  • 1928: 710 UM, LM, 137 s/f
  • 1929: 783 UM, LM, 151 s/f
  • 1931: 620 UM, LM, 136s/f
  • 1933: 555 UM, LM, 133 s/f
  • 1935: 471 UM, LM, 137 s/f
  • 1937: 486 UM, LM, and 4 Feet, 140 s/f
  • 1940: 563 UM, LM, 4 Feet and 5 Feet, 180 s/f
  • 1941: 566 LM, 4 Feet, 5 Feet and 7 Feet, 188 s/f
  • NCB Leicestershire Area 1947: 587 LM, 4 Feet, 5 Feet, 7 Feet, 189 s/f
  • No8 Area 1948: No7 Area 1949: 614 4 Feet, 5 Feet, 7 Feet, LM, 200 s/f, naked lights still
  • 1950: 614 Middle Lount and Yard, 199 s/f
  • 1957: 633 Middle Lount, Yard, Lower Main, Nether Lount, 186 s/f
  • 1960: 559 Middle Lount, Yard, 130 s/f
  • 1963: 530 Lower Main, Middle Lount, 130 s/f
  • 1964: 498 Lower Main, Yard, 132 s/f
  • 1965: 475 Nether Lount, Middle Lount, Lower Main, Yard, 130 s/f
  • 1968: Bagworth/ Nailstone 642 Lower Main, New Main, Minge, 218 s/f
  • Nailstone part closed.

Agents:

  • John Povey Harper 1886 -
  • JC Burdett (766) - 1924
  • J Robertson (1885) 1924-1945
  • FM Burdett (638) 1945-1946
  • Arthur D Butterley 1947-1950

Sub-Area Managers:

  • Harold Rutherford (3958) 1950-1956
  • Sam A McKee (3637) 1956-1957.

Group Managers:

  • William C Statham (3660) 1957-1964
  • John H Northard (4954) 1964-1966 (promoted from Rawdon)
  • Harold E Taylor (5793) 1966-1968.

Managers :

  • William Bridgett pre 1883-1886
  • Samuel Wheatley (422) 1886-1898 (left to Briton Hosea, Tugby and Co)
  • AJA Orchard (2181) 1898-1903
  • MDR Richardson (1605) 1904-1912
  • JC Burdett (991) 1912-1924
  • J Robertson (1885) 1924-1937
  • Fred M Burdett (638) 1937-1941
  • FG Cutts (1599) 1941-1942
  • William Severn (2000) 1942-1945
  • Fred M Burdett (638) 1945-1958
  • John H Northard (4954) 1958-1960 (transferred to Rawdon)
  • Jimmy McPherson (5237) 1960-1964
  • Stuart A Skelding (6257) 1964-1967
  • Stuart A Skelding (6257) for the combined mine of Bagworth / Nailstone 1967-1968, continued for Bagworth.

Undermanagers:

  • No1 Upper Main Edward Smith (1478 service cert) pre 1884-1914
  • No2 Lower Main George Watson (1842 service cert) pre 1884-1890
  • John Smithurst (395) 1890-1891
  • John C Burdett (766) 1891-1896
  • Henry Ball (2713) 1896-1907
  • T Wright (6080 / 2nd) 1907-1920
  • No1: ED Webster (7023 / 2nd) 1914-1940
  • 1914: No2: Fred M Burdett (638) 1920-1921
  • F Tomlin (229 / 2nd) 1921-1954
  • No1: ED Webster (7023 / 2nd) again 1942-1943
  • W Flint (5118 / 2nd) 1943-1963
  • No2: Thaddeus C McCarthy (5389) 1954-1957
  • Charlie Toon (4634) 1958-1961
  • for both Pits Charlie Toon (4634) again 1963-1968.

Surveyors: included……

  • Frank Goddard (2624), (noted 150 ft (45m) cover line to pebbles/flint)
  • George Moreby (2123 May 1949) -1967, (transferred to Planning dept HQ).

Fatal Accidents Nailstone: included

  • John Skinner, Sinker, fell down the shaft 14/2/1865
  • John Price (24) coal fell down the shaft and struck him 4/7/1866
  • James Vickers (43) run over by tubs 11/12/1866
  • James Hawkes (26) fall of roof 12/2/1867
  • James Ridgeway (25) fall of roof 18/12/1867
  • Richard Horton (32) fall of coal 22/6/1874
  • Joseph Matley (33) fall of roof 12/1/1875
  • James Rose (32) fall of roof 16/4/1877
  • Tom Hargreaves (21) fall of coal at the face 10/6/1885
  • Tom Boulter (32) fall of coal 16//1889
  • Walter Bowler (23) crushed by a wagon on the surface 19/10/1889
  • Henry Waltham (62) fall of roof 16/2/1897
  • William Forrester Biddle (14) crushed by tubs on 16/9/1897, died 25/9/1897
  • Andrew Perry (23) injured 6/9/1899, died 8/10/1899
  • John Charles Armstrong (29) fall of roof 17/4/1901, died 12/5/1901
  • John Kill (20) fall of roof 13/3/1907
  • Arthur Henry Hinds (49) crushed by wagons on the surface 21/3/1915
  • Arthur Holt (64) crushed by wagons on the surface 27/3/1919
  • Alexander Wood (46) run over by wagons on the surface 17/7/1927
  • Sydney James Rawlinson (?) fall of roof 17/4/1940
  • James Norman Neal (63) fall of roof, fractured skull 24/11/1941
  • Thomas Rigby (60) run over by tubs ?/10/1960.

Gob Fire

On 20th November 1968, 600 men were sent home at Harworth after another ‘gob’ fire was discovered in the Barnsley seam workings.


Bentinck Records

On 24th November 1968 Bentinck record output reached 36,400 tons and on 8th December this was surpassed by a record 45,000 tons being produced by 2,709 men and would go on to produce the highest ever yearly output of 1,789,500 tonnes.


Firbeck Main Colliery Closed After 43 Years

Firbeck Main a Nottinghamshire pit. On Nationalisation 1947 the pit was in No2 Area of the East Midlands Division Nottinghamshire but was then transferred to the Yorkshire part of the North East Division in 1949 and was administrated by No1 Area (Worksop) North East Division, then later under South Yorkshire Area.

The mine was sunk 1923-1925 near Carlton-in-Lindrick, Worksop, Nottinghamshire by Firbeck Main Collieries Ltd.

  • The Permo Trias measures were 231’ 8” (70.6m) to the coal measures, 4 thin bands of coal
  • Sharlston 2’ 4” (0.71m), 3 thin seams
  • Clown 2’ 7” (0.79m)
  • Two Foot 3’ 1” (1.01m), ? coal 2’ 11” (0.89m), ? coal and dirt 3’ 6” (1.07m)
  • ? Kents Thin 1’ 2” (0.36m)
  • Barnsley (Top Hard) 4’ 9” (1.45m) inc 4” (0.10m) dirt at 2484’ 5” (757.25m),
  • Dunsil coal 1’ 8” (0.51m), dirt 3’ 7” (1.09m), coal 2’ 6” (0.76m) at 2556’ 9” (779.3m), sump at 2569’ 1” (783m).

A colliery village had been built at Langold in Nottinghamshire. Pithead baths were opened in 1934.
Underground locos: 2’ 0” gauge 2 x 0-4-0 DMF 65hp HE 1948.
The mine was closed in November 1968 after 43 years. Abandoned 25/10/1970.


Getting Coal, Loading Tram By Hand

Seam worked: Only one seam was worked, the Barnsley Bed with 930 men underground and 279 on the surface.
Shaft positions: SK58NE 458254, 386040, 458237, 385986.
The reason for closure was uneconomic working. It seems strange that there had been no attempt to work any other seam. There was a connection underground in 1955? to nearby Dinnington pit, shaft positions, 43/5186/865670, 43/5186/846640. The shafts were filled 5/10/1970-17/2/1971.
Eric Levitt Area Surveyor and Minerals Manager signed the documents.

Manpower: Firbeck Main Collieries Ltd:

  • 1923: 49 sinking, 178 s/f
  • 1924: 190 sinking, 347 s/f
  • 1925: 651 Barnsley (Top Hard), 273 s/f
  • 1926: 1,250 B, 291 s/f
  • 1927: 1,478 B, 258 s/f
  • 1928: 2,033 B, 275 s/f
  • 1929: 2,150 B, 380 s/f
  • 1930: 2,026 B, 264 s/f
  • 1931: 2,307 B, 363 s/f
  • 1932: 1,812 B, 320 s/f
  • 1933: 1,524 B, 329 s/f
  • 1934: 1,511 B, 325 s/f
  • 1935: 1,471 B, 358 s/f
  • 1936: 1,267 B, 307 s/f
  • 1937: 1,187 B, 289 s/f
  • 1938: 1,457 B, 357 s/f
  • 1939: 1,400 B, 350 s/f
  • Doncaster Amalgamated Collieries Ltd
  • 1940: 1,370 B, 341 s/f
  • 1941: 1,439 B, 389 s/f
  • 1942: 1,437 B, 406 s/f
  • 1943: 1,355 B, 447 s/f
  • 1944: 1,481 B, 457 s/f
  • 1945: 1,450, 405 s/f, total 1,855
  • 1946: ?

Manpower and Tonnage NCB: No2 Area East Midland Division

  • 1947: 1,428 Barnsley Bed, 423 s/f
  • 1948: 1,428 B, 365 s/f
  • No1 Worksop Area North East Division
  • 1949: 1,462 B, 387 s/f, 560,000 tons
  • 1950: 1,428 B, 323 s/f
  • 1951: 1,403 B, 367 s/f, 570,000 tons
  • 1953: 1,448 B, 393 s/f
  • 1954: 1,445 B, 354 s/f
  • 1955: 1,617 B, 348 s/f
  • 1957: 1,764 B, 365 s/f
  • 1958: 1,714 B, 365 s/f
  • 1959: 1,818 B, 350 s/f
  • 1960: 1,577 B, 336 s/f
  • 1961: 1,577 B, 366 s/f
  • 1962: 1,421 B, 341 s/f
  • 1963: 1,349 B, 339 s/f
  • 1965: 1,313,B, 315 s/f
  • South Yorks Area
  • 1967: 1,180 B, 315 s/f
  • 1968: 930 Barnsley, 279 s/f
  • colliery closed Nov 1968.

Agents:

  • John Le Brun (538) 1923-1937
  • W Humble (1299) 1937-1942
  • S Hughes (531) 1942-1945
  • JTE Jones (1509) 1946
  • Agent then Sub-Area Manager H Coates (2686) 1947-1953
  • E Thompson 1953 -

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers:

  • H Coates (2686) Sub-Area Manager 1947-1953
  • Production Manager Gavin Dunn (1773)1953-1958
  • Group Manager EG Malbon 1958-.

Managers Firbeck Main:

  • John Le Brun (538) and Agent 1923-1926
  • JM Woodbridge (3794) 1926-1940
  • S Hughes (531) 1940-1942
  • Len A Clarke (2664) 1942-1946
  • JTE Jones (1509) 1947-1953 (transferred to Dinnington)
  • E Cownley (4049) 1953-
  • J Kilkenny (7645) 1967-1968, DM Tighe –1971.

Undermanagers for Firbeck Main:

  • Arthur Vernon (2nd) 1923-1940
  • AE Soar (2nd) 1940-1942
  • S Kirkham (2520) 1942-1953 (transferred to Shireoaks)
  • Tom Arblaster (4044) 1953-1957 (promoted to spare Manager No1 Area North East Division)
  • PA Walker (5797) 1957-59
  • J Newton (2nd) 1958-1962
  • DJ Stevenson (6392) 1959-1960
  • A Parrott (7285) 1960-1967
  • WS Bancroft (2nd) 1963-1968 and BF Rason (9427) 1967-1968 (transferred to Manton).

Surveyors included: …

  • Arthur Athey (1335). Surveyor, transferred to Kiveton Park 1968.

Fatal Accidents Firbeck Main

  • Cecil Charles Vaughn (25) run over by tubs 9/12/1925, died 14/12/1925
  • Willis Chandler (15) crushed by cage 21/1/1926, died 27/1/1926
  • Harry Johnson (26) fell down shaft 24/5/1928
  • John Thomas Edson (24) fall of roof 17 July 1928, died 27 July 1928
  • George Wilkinson (25) fall of roof 9/8/1928
  • John Edward Jackson (16) crushed by tubs 22/8/1929
  • Joseph Booth (49) fall of roof 4/9/1930, died 5/9/1930
  • Francis Somme Williamson (16) run over by tubs 22/9/1932
  • James William Chambers (20) run over by tubs 14/10/1932
  • George Bingham (52) injured hand 13/4/1933, died from gangrene 22/4/1933
  • David Holmes (63) caught in a conveyor 11/12/1933
  • James Lomas (31) fall of roof 29/4/1934
  • William Cocking (24) fall of roof 12/6/1934, died 30/9/1934
  • Clarence White (34) fall of roof 12/12/1934
  • Fred Rogers (48) fall of roof 27/12/1934, died 30/12/1934
  • John Claxton Markham (61) burned in the boiler house 14/9/1935, died 22/9/1935
  • William Balm Brewin (56) fall of roof 1924, died from septic carbuncle 1/4/1936
  • Thomas Hudson (51) fall of roof 5/6/1936
  • William Jackson T Heldreth (46) caught in machinery 15/3/1937
  • Fred Swindell (56) fall of roof 1/10/1937
  • John George Woodward (47) fall of roof 8/10/1937
  • William Horace Stancil (19) run over by tubs 22/12/1937, died 24/12/1937
  • Fred Reuben Hurrell (37) fall of roof 28/2/1939, died 4/3/1939
  • Llewellyn Pickford (35) caught in machinery 28/2/1939, died 4/3/1939
  • Leslie Cowgill (27) fall of roof 4/7/1939
  • Lawrence Arthur (49) fall of roof 30/1/1940
  • David Greaves (42) fall of coal 24/5/1940
  • James Robson McCarron (27) fall of roof 10/6/1940
  • 3 men burned and scalded in surface boiler house..Ernest Higginbotham (49) 25/11/1940, Leonard Higginbottom (28) 25/11/1940 and Ernest Hughes (26) 25/11/1940, died 30/11/1940
  • George Hague (56) run over by tubs 23/1/1941
  • Harold Cox (30) fall of roof 25/7/1941, died 17/8/1941
  • John Greaves (39) fall of roof 20/8/1941
  • John Thomas Richard Heape (14) fell into a slack bunker on surface 15/12/1942
  • Frederick Victor Swindell (35) fall of roof 22/4/1943
  • John Lawrence Smith (65) run over by tubs -/2/1944
  • Tom Howell Jones (34) caught in surface machinery 19/2/1944
  • Richard Potter (32) fall of coal 5/10/1945, died 17/10/1945
  • John Edward Daniel (52) fall of roof 12/7/1946
  • Amos Roe (55) fall of roof 16/1/1948
  • William Mower (56) strained himself pushing tubs 6/9/1948
  • Harry Barlow (48) fall of roof 9/9/1949
  • John Edward Brooks (55) fell from washery on surface 13/10/1948
  • John Albert Smith (44) hit by a prop 21/4/1950
  • John Hazlehurst (58) fall of roof 4/7/1945, died 16/8/1950
  • William Houlding (23) hit by a bar 17/8/1951, died 23/9/1951
  • Arthur Gibson Roberts (46) fall of roof 12/7/1952
  • Bernard Leslie Amos (16) crushed by manrider 29/8/1953
  • James Royles Gouldin (42) fall of roof 23/5/1955
  • Harold Anthony Wright (24) fall of coal 27/9/1955
  • Robert Lee (34) fall of roof 9/11/1955
  • George Fred Spencer (60) run over by tubs 15/11/1955
  • William Henry Mann (62) strained himself lifting tubs ?/6/1955, died 29/11/1955
  • William Henry Bowker (43) fall of roof 17/12/1955
  • James Smith (64) run over by tubs 2/1/1957
  • Joseph Potter Slater (76) fall of ground 19/6/1935, died 2/1/1959
  • Alwyn Eli Thompson (35) fall of roof 4/11/1964
  • Archibald Gibb (23) fall of roof ?/3/1967.

New Hucknall Reserves

Coal reserves in the existing seams were running out at New Hucknall, and it was predicted in November 1968 that the smallest mine in South Nottinghamshire Area would close sometime in 1969.  It was stated that all the 850 men would be offered jobs at the nearby pits. However as had happened several times in the past, further work would be found in other seams and the mine would survive until 1982. I remember when I started worked in 1953 it was going to be closed then but the pit would survive till 1982


Pay Increase

The NUM accepted the Boards offer of increases in pay in October 1968. There an increase of £13 for surface workers and £14 for underground men. The NUM had asked for £14 and £15 respectively. Will Paynter had retired earlier in the year as the President of the NUM. Sid Ford elected President and Lawrence Daly as Secretary.

Another wage increase was granted for the workforce, and was a further step to reducing the differentials between face workers and outbye workers.


Output Record

North Nottinghamshire Area miners shattered all previous records by producing 260,000 tons in a day on 25th November.


Garforth Oil Lamp Introduced

The GR6 (1967) Garforth oil lamp was introduced into the local pits. By means of a rubber bulb a sample of air could be injected into the side of the lamp through a special connector and a ‘gas cap’ could be determined very accurately by an Official, should any exist in the sample taken, and an extendable pipe could be poked into a crevice or awkward high point previously inaccessible, to pump out a sample.

 


Some Collieries And Seams Given Code Letters
And New Numbers For Panels

From around this period at pits in North Derbyshire Area panel numbers were prefixed as computerised alphabetical order of collieries. Supposedly one could know immediately which panel was at which pit. Thus U70 would have been a panel at Warsop, V at Westthorpe, W at Whitwell, X at Williamthorpe / Grassmoor. Others were C for Arkwright, D for Bolsover, F for Glapwell, G for High Moor, J for Ireland, K for Langwith, L for Markham, N for Oxcroft, P for Pleasley, R for Renishaw Park and S for Shirebrook…? It seemed most complicated to me, particular as some pits just so happened to coincide with the letter whilst others for example U for Warsop did not seem to make sense and of course it got worse as more and more collieries closed. However to identify an old panel at a colliery prior to this date was impossible, so what was the point?

In South Nottinghamshire Area the seams were annotated with a letter, so for example all High Hazles panels were prefixed with the letter A, e.g. A9s, and Abdy Brinsley panels C, thus C2s. However these were changed once again, e.g. Abdy Brinsley 11s became AB11s and High Main panels were prefixed M, e.g. M47. Again this did not allow for the old High Main panels being simple numbers e.g. 50s, 52s etc in the past. Blackshale panels were prefixed K, e.g. K 58s. The old panel numbers were 1s, 2s, 3s etc, so again what was the point?

North Nottinghamshire Area didn’t change and it was up to the relevant colliery Manager to agree on a number, generally pre-worked out by Planner and Surveyor to accommodate say odds and even numbers in the take, but when one panel went out of order so did the following ones. Back to square one…confusion!

In old No4 Area days at Teversal (North Nottinghamshire), Horace Gubbins the Manager liked simple numbers 10s, 20s, 30s, 40s etc and did not like big numbers and although there were 5 or 6 faces working at one time, for a period the panel numbers never went above 70s, and we had three panels in the Dunsil seam called 10s, albeit worked at different periods but relatively near to one another, then to top it up we had another 10s panel in the Waterloo worked below them, so you can imagine the confusion when relating to ‘old 10s’…! We were able to persuade the next Manager to have a different number for most new panels, going up as far as 150s…even so we had two 120s panels and a 130s which was just development headings!


First Million Tons

Men and management celebrated as Ollerton colliery (North Nottinghamshire) produced its first one million tons on 7th December 1968 and had a record 1,058,675 tons for the year 1968-1969 with a manpower of 1,384, and using 3½ ton mine cars wound at No1 DC shaft.
In the photograph, left to right: John Brass (Deputy Manager), Ted Lilley (NACODS Union Secretary), Wilf Pearson (Mechanical Engineer), Dave Rodden (Colliery General Manager), Eric Spencer (Administrative Officer) and Sam Kilner (NUM Secretary).


Miner Went Missing Underground

A mystery arose on 20/12/1968 when Albert Young (62) went missing underground on the afternoon shift at Langton. He had been transferred there when Brookhill closed earlier in the year. After searches were made and he was not found all machines were stood. Kirkby having closed in July was being salvaged. The collieries were interconnected underground and it would appear that Young had crawled down a drawn off gate with a min height of 2’ 9” (0.85m) and max 6’ 0” (1.83m) and was found by Alan Brook a Deputy accompanied by Norman Derek Orrell (36) sitting in a leaning position but dead. His cap lamp was away from him but still lit. The 2 men were commended for finding him but were criticised for breaking every rule in the book by travelling the drawn off roadway where he was found. The reason for Young’s demise was never solved.


Opencast Working

  • Blue Lodge Extension Sough, Furnace, Brinsley Thin, High Hazels, Thin coal, 1st St John’s, 2nd St John’s (R McGregor and Sons Ltd)
  • Cromford Canal North Extension Coombe, Top Hard, Dunsil, 1st, 2nd, 3rd Wateloo, Waterloo Marker (Currall, Lewis and Martin Ltd)
  • Godbers Lum 1st and 2nd Ell, Chavery, Top Soft, Roof Soft (Currall, Lewis Martin Ltd)
  • Parkhouse Clay Cross Soft, Deep Hard (Robert McGregor and Sons Ltd)
  • Salterwood First Piper, Hospital, Tupton, threequarter, Yard, Silkstone (Robert McGregor and Sons Ltd)
  • Woodside Clowne 5’ 0” (1.52m), Sough coal 3’ 9” (1.14m), Furnace 2’ 5” (0.74m) Currall, Lewis and Martin Ltd) 1/7/1964 - 6/5/1968.

Inspector's Report 1968

44 NCB pits plus 7 Licensed mines and 9 Pumping Stations.

Output for 1968 was 34,939,534 tons at 54.8 cwts oms. 99% power loaded.

12 men were killed and there were 156 serious accidents including 2 men killed on the surface and 20 serious accidents.

2 locos hauling manrider carriages collided head on travelling towards one another on the same rails. Several men injured.

There was one ignition of firedamp and14 fires underground.

Merges in the year. Brookhill and Bentinck, Bestwood and Linby, Selston partly with Moorgreen and partly with Pye Hill.

Surface drift at Bentinck commissioned in August 1968 and a record daily output of 11,756 tons from one face and a record weekly output of 45,220 tons.

Alfreton, Clifton, Denby, Holmewood and Kirkby Summit closed.

Electric winders installed at Annesley, Bestwood, Bolsover, replacing steam.

2,000 tons surface rapid loading bunkers were built at Langwith (first), Blidworth, Calverton and Shirebrook. A 3,000 tons bunker was built at Cotgrave. They all used liner trains to transport coal to Power Stations in the Trent Valley.

The new idea of advance headings was practised at 17 pits and stable hole elimination at 62 face ends.

A mobile stone dust barrier with trays slung on a monorail was experimented with.

 

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