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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Chimneys
1957

  1957    1     2     3     4  

1957 - Page 3


Mechanised Mining At Teversal

Getting coal face 11 with Dowty props and W barsAt Teversal, (Nottinghamshire) mechanised mining was introduced in the newly developed First Waterloo seam with the introduction of a rope hauled power loading Anderton shearer, on 1s a panzer armoured face conveyor and hydraulic props and link bars.  The machine cut one way and ploughed back the other.  However ponies were still employed in transporting supplies to the tailgate lip.  A flat rate of £5 a shift was paid in the new seam with the production task being 2 strips or shears a shift.

There was a friable roof in the Waterloo seam and major roof falls were experienced, particularly on the second face 2s working uphill at 1in8. 

AB 15 coal cutters and hand-filled faces continued in the Dunsil seam with rigid props and some hydraulic props and W bars and pvc (“rubber”) conveyors.  Peake turntables had been installed at the surface to facilitate easier handling, although tubs were still weighed individually at the surface weighing machines by check weighers. These improvements were part of the £1m reconstruction scheme.

There was a quaint mix of modern and old fashioned.


Salaries For Management Staff

Salaries for management and staff personnel:

  • Deputy Area Production Manager (Planning) £2,000 - £2,850
  • Agent Manager £1,700 - £2,250
  • Colliery Manager £1,250 - £1,800
  • Undermanager £975 - £1,300
  • Electrical Engineer and Mechanical Engineer £800 - £1,225
  • Group Surveyor £900 - £1,250
  • Colliery Surveyor £725 - £1,000
  • Area Chief Engineer £1,750 - £2,750
  • Coal Prep Manager £525 - £1,045
  • Senior Planning Engineer £1,500 - £2,300
  • Deputy Area Planning Engineer not less than £1,200 with Surveyors certificate
  • Group Planner £950 - £1,450
  • Assistant Group Planner not less than £750, with Surveyors or First Class certificate
  • Planner (Geology) Surveyor £725 - £1,000
  • Civil Engineer Grade 6 £800 - £1,225
  • Land Surveyor £460 x £25 - £700 - £755 for qualified Surveyors
  • Method Study Engineer £560 @ 23, £580 @ 24, £600 @ 25 – max £900
  • Area Ventilation Engineer £825 - £1,300
  • Canteen Manager / Manageress £9 1s 3d or £6 11s 6d p.w. (per week). State Registered Nurse £520 x £20 - £640 + £30 Industrial Nursing Certificate + uniform £15 p.a.

Pay rates for mineworkers was improved by 1s 7d (8p) a shift in March 1957.

  • The minimum rate underground was £1 11s 8d (£1.58⅓) a shift
  • £1 8s 4d (£1.41½) a shift for surface workers. 

WPIS (Weekly Paid Industrial Staff) rates were increased also.  Rates of pay for Under-officials were revised from July 1957:

  • Overmen- £18 7s 6d (£18.37½) to £19 7s 6d (£19.37½)
  • Deputy Grade I - £17 7s 6d (£17.37½)
  • Deputy Grade II and Shotfirers £15 15s 0d (£15.75) per week. 

At the same time there were revised conditions of employment.  The main changes were the establishment of roster duties, ensuring that Officials:-

  • Would not normally be required to work more than 6 shifts a week or more than 23 shifts in four consecutive weeks. 
  • There would be a reduction of the weekly rate by one sixth for each day’s unofficial absence. 
  • Improved sickness benefits
  • Additional annual holidays based on length of service of 5 years and 10 years
  • Travelling allowances were introduced if they were transferred from one pit to another.

Meco-Moores At A Peak

Use of the Meco Moore cutter loader was now at its peak and would decline quickly as faces would be equipped with shearers in the future. A Meco machine is shown cutting out a stable hole. One of the main problems with the machine was that it had to be turned round at the gate ends, hence the stable holes.


Brookhill And Langton

Working Blackshale seam recommenced at Brookhill (Derbyshire) on 25th March 1957. Drifts were driven into South 3s district at Langton (Nottinghamshire) from the Low Main working and after preparation work, the panel was taken over by Brookhill management.


Apprentices

Student Apprenticeship schemes were introduced for mining, mechanical and electrical engineering personnel, their goal being a career in management. The NCBs Staff College completed its first year.

Apprenticeships for Surveyors of mines continued as before, which composed of a day-release course and a separate evening class at the Technical College for about 5 years, which was followed by a 2 paper written examination at Doncaster, Stoke or other centres, followed by a 3-day practical examination which composed of an underground test using theodolite, surface test using level and theodolite, office test including tracing/drawing and calculation and 20 minutes oral, providing of course that the written exam had been passed and a minimum of 2,000 hours underground had been completed. Even after qualification a Surveyor had to be supervised for 3 years by a Senior or Group Surveyor who signed all the relevant documents. Occasionally these anomalies will be seen throughout the book, particularly in the 1950s. Trainee Management courses for First and Second class certificates and examination centres were in tandem at the same venues.


Silverhill Reconstruction Finished

At Silverhill (Nottinghamshire) the reconstruction scheme started in 1955 was completed.  Electric winding engines had replaced the old steam ones and 3½ ton capacity mine cars had replaced tubs for coal winding.  A bunker and loading point was installed at the Yard seam horizon in the pit bottom, and the output for 1958 rose to 580,543 tons.


NUM

Jack Tighe was elected President of Nottinghamshire NUM Branch.


Production Began At High Moor

Production at the new High Moor Drift mine (Derbyshire) began from the 3ft 3in (0.99m) Clowne seam with handfilling methods and a manpower of 62.  A radial fan of only 10hp was used for ventilation flow.  This would have to be increased to 30hp in 1959. Originally this mine was seen as part of Westthorpe.

Blue Bell - High Moor

The driving of twin surface drifts at High Moor (Derbyshire) continued. It was called the Blue Bell mine as an emblem on the scarf shows. These were given out to the women employees and was given to me by Margaret Hewitt the only female Cost Clerk. At the interview, later, she was warned that as the only woman at the mine it could be an embarrassment because of the bad language. She said so as not to upset the men she would have to curb her swearing. On appointment she was fixed up with a helmet, duffle coat and wellingtons because part of her job necessitated going across the muddy pit yard, which was a quagmire, particularly after rain.

 The mine was surrounded by old pits such as: Comberwood, Ashley Comber Wood, Websters, Whymsey, High Moor, Westthorpe, Newland, Hall’s Upperthorpe, Upperthorpe, High Moor, Westthorpe and Bagley.

At Barlborough Common named pits were: Redding Lane, Woodhouse, Woodhouse Lane, Westfield High Lane, Westfield or sough, Barlborough Common, Beighton Fields, Cottam Hazel, Cottam, Barlborough, Hollinwood (Goslings), Applebys, Glebe and Oxcroft.


Leicestershire

Pithead baths opened at Measham, (South Derbyshire). New office extension was opened at Coleorton Hall to accommodate Area HQ staff.


Denby And Flamsteed

At Denby (Derbyshire) the Silkstone seam coal 1‘ 7” (0.48m), shale 4” (0.10m), coal 2’ 3” (0.69m) was abandoned on 3rd May including the Flamsteed Surface Drift at 1in2.5 sunk 1951, Manager Ronnie CH Hamilton (4441).


Colliery Closures

Pilsley Colliery Closed After 92 Years

On 23rd May 1957, Pilsley colliery (Derbyshire) sunk in 1864 - 1865 by Thomas Holdsworth, and later taken over by Pilsley Coal Co Ltd was closed after 92 years.

The shafts were:-
No1, 146 yards (133m) to Deep Hard, sunk in 1864
No2 pit 12 ft dia (3.65m) sunk 1865, 274 yards (250m) to Blackshale 216 yards (197m) to Tupton, abandoned 1922, pumping shaft.  Position SK46SW, 442638, 363124. 
No3 shaft developed the Tupton seam, 1,500 tons per day for the total colliery output

2 Upcast Shafts.

The mine was situated to the north of the village of Pilsley and to the south of Hardstoft Common and the hamlet of Waterloo.
The pit top was 595 ft (181m) above sea level.
There had been a major strike in 1891
A new canteen was built in 1954
Highest manpower ever was 1,302 in 1913.
When the closure was muted in 1956 there were 371 men.  At closure the 350 men were offered jobs at nearby collieries.
The mine was a unit of No1 Area NCB.
Seams worked
Deep Hard pre 1884-1948
Tupton (Low Main after 1942) pre 1884-1952
Tupton Threequarters 1926-1957
Yard 3’ 4½” (1.03m) No5 pit, 1928-1932
Silkstone or Blackshale pre 1884, worked out Oct 1922

The maximum output was 235,046 tons with 627 men in 1951.  The maximum manpower was 671 in 1948 when 218,595 tons was produced.

Manpower: Pilsley Colliery Co:

  • from 1894: No1: 213 Deep Hard, 27 s/f
  • No2: 277 Silkstone, 45 s/f
  • No3: 304 Tupton, 92 s/f
  • 1895: 203 DH, 28 s/f, 254 S, 47 s/f, 296 T, 79 s/f
  • 1896: 204 DH, 25 s/f, 250 S. 45 s/f, 243 T, 27 s/f
  • 1897: 164 DH, 24 s/f, 241 S, 43 s/f, 244 T, 82 s/f
  • 1898: 168 DH, 29 s/f, 190 S, 33 s/f, 225 T, 83 s/f
  • 1899: 206 DH, 30 s/f, 236 S, 45 s/f, 240 T, 83 s/f
  • 1900: 217 DH, 33 s/f, 281 S, 50 s/f, 292 T, 77 s/f
  • 1901: 223 DH, 38 s/f, 292 S, 45 s/f, 294 T, 115 s/f
  • 1902: 278 DH, 36 s/f, 257 S, 95 s/f, 296 T, 54 s/f
  • 1903: 304 DH, 64 s/f, 309 S, 77 s/f, 374 T, 82 s/f
  • 1904: 294 DH, 77 s/f, 295 S,63 s/f, 371 T, 47 s/f
  • 1905: 257 DH, 64 s/f, 304 S, 81 s/f, 360 T, 95 s/f
  • 1906: 202 DH, 54 s/f, 270 S, 79 s/f, 342 T, 94 s/f
  • 1907: 272 DH, 63 s/f, 314 S, 84 s/f, 362 T, 96 s/f
  • 1908: 287 DH, 54 s/f, 294 S, 89 s/f, 348 T, 103 s/f
  • 1909: 273 DH, 46 s/f, 301 S, 88 s/f, 332 T, 96 s/f
  • 1910: 285 DH, 50 s/f, 315 S, 90 s/f, 342 T, 102 s/f
  • 1911: 305 DH, 53 s/f, 327 S, 91 s/f, 353 T, 110 s/f
  • 1912: 286 DH, 52 s/f, 338 S, 93 s/f, 370 T, 108 s/f
  • 1913: 316 DH, 53 s/f, 344 S, 96 s/f, 361 T, 110 s/f
  • 1914: 290 DH, 53 s/f, 352 S, 97 s/f, 350 T, 100 s/f
  • 1915: 290 DH, 55 s/f, 323 S, 96 s/f, 320 T, 110 s/f
  • 1916: 333 DH, 60 s/f, 328 S, 98 s/f, 313 T, 106 s/f
  • 1917: 329 DH, 53 s/f, 291 S, 96 s/f, 309 T, 116 s/f
  • 1918: 323 DH, 57 s/f, 230 S, 80 s/f, 300 T, 117 s/f
  • 1919: 396 DH, 61 s/f, 275 S, 93 s/f, 325 T, 123 s/f
  • 1920: 385 DH, 61 s/f, 100 S, 91 s/f, 396 T, 120 s/f
  • 1921: 372 DH, 61 s/f, 89 S, 91 s/f, 411 T, 125 s/f
  • 1922: 328 DH, 65 s/f, 13 Silkstone, 10 s/f, abandoned 10/10/1922, 411 T, 162 s/f
  • 1923: 296 DH, 80 s/f, 378 T, 167 s/f
  • 1924: No1: 283 DH, 85 s/f, No3: 396 T, 157 s/f
  • 1925: 275 DH, 92 s/f, 409 T, 153 s/f
  • 1926: 201 DH, 57 s/f, 371 Tupton and Tupton Threequarters, 148 s/f
  • 1927: 195 DH, 72 s/f, 412 T and T¾, 162 s/f
  • 1928: No1: 109 DH, 55 s/f, Nos 3, 4, 5: 486 T, T¾ and Yard, 161 s/f
  • 1929: 109 DH, 55 s/f, 486 T, T¾ and Y, 161 s/f
  • 1930: 99 DH, 52 s/f, 511 T, T¾ and Y, 161 s/f
  • 1931: 90 DH, 46 s/f, 489 T, T¾ and Y, 153 s/f
  • 1932: 91 DH, 41 s/f, 489 T, T¾ and Yard fin, 162 s/f
  • 1933: 69 DH, 41 s/f, 489 T and T¾, 155 s/f
  • 1934: 69 DH, 41 s/f, 489 T and T¾, 159 s/f
  • 1935: 64 DH, 40 s/f, 467 T and T¾, 153 s/f
  • 1936: 40 DH, 26 s/f,  464 T and T¾, 166 s/f
  • 1937: 52 DH, 30 s/f, 471 T and T¾, 161 s/f
  • 1938: 47 DH, 24 s/f, 473 T and T¾, 166 s/f
  • 1939: 1940: 37 DH, 23 s/f, 451 T, T¾ and Yard, 157 s/f
  • 1941: 34 DH, 31 s/f, 471 T, T¾ and Y, 157 s/f
  • 1942: 5 DH, 523 Y, T¾ and Low Main (Tupton), 184 s/f
  • 1943: 508 DH, LM and T¾, 174 s/f
  • 1944: 503 T¾ and LM, 190 s/f
  • 1945: 490 Yard, T¾ and LM, 190 s/f
  • 1946: 500 u/g, 194 s/f.

Output and Manpower NCB: No1 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 201,414 tons, 668 men
  • 1948: 218,595 tons, 500 Tupton, Tupton Threequarters, Yard, 176 s/f, 671 men ave
  • 1949: 222,395 tons, T, T¾, Yard,  659 men ave
  • 1950: 231,324 tons, 500 T and Threequarters, Yard fin, 150 s/f, 622 men ave
  • 1951: 235,046 tons, 500 T, T ¾, 150 s/f,    627 men ave
  • 1952: 195,580 tons, 507 T, T ¾, 124 s/f, 535 men ave
  • 1953: 147,363 tons, 421 men
  • 1954: 126,234 tons, 342 T, 3/4s, 73 s/f, 412 men ave
  • 1955: 134,091 tons, 330 T, 3/4s, 75 s/f, 396 men ave
  • 1956: 109,019 tons, 296 Threequarters, 78 s/f, 371 men ave
  • 1957: 33,647 tons, 166 men.  Ceased coal production April 1957
  • 1958: 37 u/g, 34 s/f.

Agents:

  • Thos Holdsworth 1864 - 1893
  • George Chambers Agent - 1929
  • ME Wild (2749) Agent 1929 -
  • William H Southern (2602) Agent 1941-1950
  • GF Gardner (1333) Agent 1950 -
  • Agent Len Gross (2351) - 1957.

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers:

  • JS Rayner (3077) Sub Area Manager -1952
  • Ben Kendall (1944) Sub Area Manager 1952-1953
  • George P Thompson (2914) Sub-Area Manager 1953-1954
  • Arthur G Douthwaite 1954-1957
  • Len Gross (2351) temp 1957
  • Frank T Murphy (4644) 1957-1958.

Managers for Pilsley

  • Thos Holdsworth and Agent 1864-1893
  • Samuel Godber pre 1872-1884 Manager (for Thos Holdsworth and Co)
  • Sam Rayner (1372) 1884-1902 (Pilsley Colliery Co)
  • WJ Wilkinson (1800) 1902-1909
  • ME Wild (2749) 1909-1929 (promoted to Agent)
  • Oscar Holt Taylor (2511) Manager and Surveyor 1929-1939
  • George G Bourne (508) 1940-1941
  • William H Southern (2602) Manager and Agent 1941-1950
  • RH Swallow (2557) Manager 1950-1958.

Undermanagers for Pilsley:

  • Herbert Mitchell (Service cert) pre 1887-1900 No1
  • Robert Hallam (2nd) pre 1887-1906 No2
  • HE Maltby (2nd) pre 1887-1894 No3
  • T Savage (2nd) 1895-1899 No3 and 1907-1928 No2
  • George Gittins (2nd) 1899-1925 No1
  • WJ Wilkinson  (1800) 1899-1902 No3 (promoted to Manager)
  • CW Tagg (1797) 1902-1908 (transferred to Pentrich then Teversal 1910)
  • HD Blockley (2nd) 1908-1918 No3
  • S Stone (2nd) 1925-1926
  • Oscar Holt Taylor (2511) 1926-1929 Nos1, No3, No5 (promoted to Manager)
  • AE Tagg (2nd) 1929-1939
  • William Morrison (2026) 1940
  • SB Wilson (2nd) 1941-1943
  • EC Prince (2nd) 1943-1946 and NCB No1 Area 1947 cont-1954
  • Terry C Beaver (4436) 1954-1957 (transferred from Williamthorpe).

Surveyors included: 

  • Luke Sampson 1920s
  • Oscar Holt Taylor (2511) Surveyor and Manager -1939
  • JH Gordon Johns (No 91 certificate, 1914) 1940s
  • Fred Owen (1256)
  • Geoff T Hancock (2755) -1957 (transferred to Glapwell).       

Fatal Accidents at Pilsley:

  • John Cutts (16) crushed by a pony 10-Mar-1869
  • Thomas Walvin (46) killed in an explosion of firedamp 20-Mar-1871
  • John Warrener (23) fall of roof 17-Oct-1873
  • William Phillips (35) fell down the shaft 14-Nov-1873
  • Arthur Sharp (17) fall of roof 20-Nov-1873
  • William Hadfield (13) crushed by a wagon on the surface 20-Jan-1877
  • Joseph Smith (30) fall of coal 28-Jun-1877
  • John Birch (18) run over by tubs 6-Oct-1877
  • Joseph James (19) fall of coal 21-Aug-1879
  • William Moseley (30) fall of roof 7-May-1880
  • Alfred Eyre (15) run over by tubs 21-Mar-1881, No3 pit
  • Thomas Newey (40) run over by tubs 13-Apr-1881, No2 pit
  • Henry Williams (53) crushed by a wagon on the surface 30-Jan-1883
  • James Guest (26) fall of coal 21-Nov-1883
  • George Savage (15) run over by tubs 11-Nov-1885
  • Frederick Roper (16) run over by tubs 26-Jan-1888
  • David Saville (56) fall of roof 15-Jul-1891
  • Isaiah Rickers (13) run over by tubs 1-Nov-1892
  • John William Smith (48) fall in a roadway 3-Jan-1894
  • William Alfred Slater (15) run over by tubs 23-Sep-1895
  • Thomas Palmer (20) fall of side 7-Oct-1895
  • John Henry Bailsford (18) run over by tubs 10-Oct-1899, No3 pit
  • Thomas Green (49) fall of coal 20-Mar-1900
  • Christopher Hall (57) fall of coal 2-Sep-1901
  • George Mitchell (42) fall of roof on 27-Feb-1902 but died on 15-Sep-1902, No 3 pit
  • Ernest Sellars (27) fall of roof 8-Jan-1903, No2 pit
  • Samuel Sellars (58) fall of roof 1-Apr-1903, died 5-Apr-1903
  • Joseph Evans (25) fall of roof 26-May-1904, No3 pit
  • Stephen Lindley (59) caught in machinery on the surface 14-Dec-1904
  • George Bowes (47) and Walter Gill (47) both died from fumes from a fire on the dirt tip 30-Dec-1904
  • Sam Wheatcroft (54) fall of roof 19-Oct-1907, died 8-Dec-1907, No1 pit
  • John Rhodes (47) fall in a roadway 4-Jun-1908
  • Willie Slatcher (30) crushed by a wagon on the surface 13-May-1910
  • William Turner Lane (50) fall of roof 23-Jan-1911
  • Thomas Stevenson (54) crushed by tubs 7-Feb-1911
  • Richard Maidens (55) was injured on the surface 8-Sep-1910 but died from septicaemia 7-Feb-1911
  • William Hopkinson (67) crushed by a wagon on the surface 28-Feb-1911
  • William Wycherley (46) fall of roof 14-Sep-1911
  • Frank Webster (19) fall of roof 6-Jun-1912
  • Edward Whitworth (54) fall of coal 24-Mar-1914, died 30-Apr-1914
  • Tom William Alsop (34) run over by tubs 3-Aug-1915
  • David Jones (33) partially buried by fall of roof 12-Sep-1918
  • Fred Parkin (53) fall of roof 11-Nov-1920
  • Enoch Guy (53) strained himself lifting a tub 4-Jul-1922, died 9-Jul-1922
  • Sam Cook (57) injured his chest on 21-Nov-1922, died 8-Dec-1922
  • Levi Walters (65) crushed by tubs 7-Jul-1925
  • James Thomas Maycock (47) fall of roof 8-Dec-1925
  • Edward Willett (16) crushed by tubs 13-Jul-1927
  • Reg Gradage (27) fall of roof 29-Nov-1927, died 17-Jan-1928
  • Edward Plant (33) fall of roof 5-Nov-1929, died 2-Dec-1930  
  • Reuben Box (65) fell down the shaft 5-May-1931
  • James Thomas Whyld (58) fall of roof 7-Mar-1934, died 14-May-1934
  • Clifford Graves (15) fell over a rail and struck his head 5-Aug-1937
  • Samuel Hayes (23) fall of roof 29-May-1940
  • Walter Thompson (53) fall of roof 26-Jan-1942
  • Seth Raymond Swann (?) 12-Apr-1944
  • Harold Kimes (29) fall of roof 8-Aug-1956

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