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Bill Bell - It is George "Stevenson"
David Cholerton - Coppice Colliery Date
Bob Gellatly - Mansfield Colliery - Spelling
Jimmy Hoover -You've listed many coal mines as 'Wigan pits', which is not true.
Frank Moran - Minnie Pit was NOT named after the daughter of the owner
Michelle Rice - Mining Trip, Ilkeston Mines Rescue Station
Brian Donlon - John and Thomas Donlon were brothers of my grandmother
Bill and Evelyn - It says "carcket" instead of cracket



Corrections   1    2    3    4 

From:
Sent:
Subject:
Bill Bell
25 May 2012
It is George "Stevenson"

Hi
It is George “Stephenson” your article wrongly mentions “Stevenson”, an easy mistake.

Regards
Bill Bell
President
NEIMME


From:
Sent:
Subject:
David Cholerton
28 July 2010
Coppice Colliery Date

Hi again Fionn,

Just noticed on the ‘Pits in the East Midlands’ page.  Should the Coppice Colliery opening date, down as 1975, actually be 1875?

Regards,

David


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Bob Gellatly
25 April 2009
Mansfield Colliery - Spelling.

Hi
Just a small typo error on your excellent web site. Mansfield Colliery was located at Forest Town not Forrest Town.

Regards
Bob


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Jimmy Hoover
20 April 2009
You've listed many coal mines as 'Wigan pits', which is not true.
Hello again,
On having a look-up from your mining site, I noticed you now have much more information.

However, on the down-side, I also notice you've had information from a Wigan site, 'Winder's'. This has prompted you to give false information, in so much as you've now listed many coal mines as 'Wigan pits', which is not true.

One of your featured collieries, Maypole, is now listed as 'Maypole colliery, Wigan'. Sacrilege!

The Maypole colliery was in ABRAM, not Wigan.

Since the 1974 local government act created the 'metropolitan borough of Wigan', it has placed many of these collieries within the Wigan 'council area', but none of them were ever in Wigan.

This is coal mining 'history', not coal mining 'modern day council area'.

Speaking in terms of 'coal producing areas', all the Ashton in Makerfield and Haydock collieries you have listed as 'Wigan collieries' were actually in the St.Helens coal area, not Wigan.

Tyldesley area was in the Manchester colliery area.

It's so easy to be taken in by these Wigan promoters. To them, everything, everywhere is in Wigan and Wigan is the only place in England where coal mining took place.

Wigan, to them who know no better, was the main centre of coal mining in Britain, when the truth is that there is no coal under Wigan.

All the collieries were in other places, like Pemberton, Ince, Billinge, Leigh, Ashton in Makerfield, Haydock, Parr etc. These were all places with a close knit mining community that were not in Wigan.

Please stop referring to mines being in Wigan when they weren't. It's spoiling your, otherwise , factual site.

Regards,

JemmyH.

See also Email 2


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Frank Moran
27 January 2009
Minnie Pit was NOT named after the daughter of the owner

Hi Fionn

Long time since I got in touch with you.

That was a good story by John Lumsdon on the Minnie Pit explosion but he fell for the three card trick.

The Minnie Pit was NOT named after the daughter of the owner. The owner had 13 children of whom six were girls. In fact the pit was named after the daughter-in-law.

John Craig the brother married Minnie Crig of 17 Christchurch Rd., Folkestone in London 1882 aged 24. It is mentioned in the Indenture June 19th 1890 held at Stafford Record Office.

Hope this helps to clear a misdemeanour of the Minnie Pit.

Frank Moran


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Michelle Rice
17 January 2009
Mining Trip, Ilkeston Mines Rescue Station
Hi There,
I found myself (Michelle Rice) by accident whilst searching the web. I believe that the date should be 1982 as I recall just having started senior school when Tracy and I made this trip.

Hope this helps

Michelle


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Brian Donlon
9 December 2008
John and Thomas Donlon were brothers of my grandmother

Amongst the dead of the 1908 Maypole mine disaster you list two names, John Donlan and Thomas Donlan. These two were brothers of my grandmother. The surname should be Donlon although I am at a loss to know why they changed it from Donnellan which was the name they used in Co Mayo.

Brian Donlon


From:
Sent:
Subject:
Bill and Evelyn
24 September 2008
Typo - It says "carcket" instead of cracket

Looks like you have a typographical error in the heading of the below linked page. It says "carcket" instead of cracket.

As a child during the 2nd world war, my sister and I lived with our parents at Heworth Colliery in what was then County Durham (Now Tyne and Wear). My Dad worked as a fitter at the pit. Like many of us in the era, I had few toys as a bairn. Growing up in the colliery village during the years leading up to the WW2 we kids made do with whatever was at hand and counted on a creative imagination to find adventure and learning.

Precious to me as a play toy was a cracket my coal miner dad had made out of scraps of wood. Aside from being a stool to sit on by the coal fire, this simple piece of furniture came in handy to get to things that had deliberately been placed too high for an inquiring child to reach.

But more than that, in my mind this cracket, turned different ways became a tank, a battleship, or a fort.

Now, in my retirement, I occupy myself by making wooden toys for my grandbairns who are with their parents in Phoenix, Arizona. I just got done making a cracket. My hope is that somehow, I can arouse in the kids a curiosity and interest about their family history and coal mining heritage. What I need is stories and pictures that might convey the use and importance of the cracket doon the pits and as a vital piece of furniture in many miner's cottages.

www.healeyhero.co.uk/rescue/glossary/cracket.htm

Bill Macdonald

Cracket
A Felling lad, now in Gig Harbor, a tiny fishing port
Washington State

USA



Pit Terminology - Glossary


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