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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Bk5
Chimneys
1982
1984

1982 Pages   1     2     3     4  

1982 - Page 1


HM Inspectorate

A Harley succeeded as Chief Inspector of Mines (1982-1988)
John W Jones (4652) continued as District Inspector
Guy DR Adamson (5391) as Inspector
HMI rates of pay £18,830-£22,835 from December 1981.


Final Pay Offer

Miners voted against strike action in favour of the NCBs final pay offer of 9.3% rise. This was backdated to November 1981. A service bonus scheme was introduced for the first time.


A Group Of Ollerton Miners Sent Joe Gormley 30 Pieces Of Silver

A group of Ollerton miners sent NUM President Joe Gormley ‘30 pieces of silver’ and the message ‘Like Judas, here is your payment for betrayal’.


British Railways And NCB Agreement

British Railways Board and NCB Agreement 26th January 1982. Basically this related to the working of coal supporting Railway property. It also outlined and stipulated that only one working face at a time could undermine the main East Coast line. Where undermining was being carried out, a considerable distance either side was necessary for the high speed trains to slow down, pass through the area and then speed up again. Of course this affects the time tables for the running of the trains and does not necessarily affect one NCB Area as by chance there could be an undermining in Durham or Yorkshire as well as one planned at Harworth in Nottinghamshire for example. It had to be carefully monitored to avoid clashing. British Rail Surveyors liaised with NCB Surveyors and updated their plans of workings and also continually checked the lines for subsidence as packing up or realignment could have been necessary and this of course needed to be done generally at weekends when there was less traffic. This is another factor with mining that the public are generally unaware of.


First Installation of Walking Roadway Shield Support

At Ollerton (North Nottinghamshire) at the end of January 1982, the first installation in the country of a prototype Markham Walking Roadway Shield Support was put to work in a scour some 330 yards (300m) following 1s advancing face to the dip in the Parkgate seam. The ground was cut down using a large Anderson Strathclyde RH 14 cutter-loader. The shield was then hydraulically advanced as quickly as possible and arches set. It was loosely based on the idea of Marc Brunel (Isambard Kingdom was his son) who used it 100 years previously whilst tunnelling in the soft London clays under the River Thames. As Surveyor, I introduced a laser beam for alignment and grade and assisted the Area Photographer with favourable photos of the site. Foam fill behind the arches was tried as an experiment. Due to weak roof problems, the anchoring of the shield to be able to pull it in on line created a major problem as it started to crab, and further aggravation was experienced with packing falling behind the shield. The voids were then filled with expansion foam and other types of fill such as aerostem, hardstem and sodium silicate. Finally before the project was abandoned after some 330 yards (300m) advance, it had been decided to jack the arch legs up making contact with the roof. Again this was a project that I carefully monitored and kept detailed records for a report to the Manager Walter Standage to pass on to Area HQ.

Four other shields were installed, after modifications, firstly at Clipstone, in a Deep Soft scour where the backfill to the arches was aqualite. The next was 50s Supply gate rip operating with a Mavor Ripping machine at Creswell in June 1984 where a Markham Universal Roadway powered support was used to pull in the shield. At Mansfield a Shield was installed in the Low Main at 8s Supply gate lip in Aug 1984. Finally at Harworth the modified Ollerton shield was installed in a development heading in Feb 1985. However this was a failure as a large fall damaged the shield and it had to be abandoned (North Nottinghamshire).


Special Steel Cover Over Shaft

Refurbishment of girder work at Ollerton No2 shaft top required a special steel cover to be erected over the shaft from 29th July to 5th August to allow the work to be carried out by the ATT (Area Tunnelling Team). Only a limited number of men were allowed into the mine to allow essential maintenance work to be carried out under the watchful eye of HMI Guy DR Adamson (5391).


Relics Officer

I was appointed Relics Officer on 23rd July 1982. A besom brush in perfect condition was found in the pit bottom behind an old stopping wall, showing how keen they were in the past about sweeping up and keeping the pit bottom clean. I deposited it with Dr Alan R Griffin at Lound Hall Museum.


Record Area OMS

The pits in North Derbyshire achieved a new record for any Area w.e. 20th February 1982, with an OMS of 3.67 tonnes.


New Hucknall Colliery Finally Closed After 106 Years

New Hucknall, colliery (South Nottinghamshire) sunk from 1874-1876 by the New Hucknall Colliery Co off Common Road, Huthwaite was closed in February 1982 after 106 years. Locally called ‘New Huckna’. It cost about £70,000 to open out.

No1 Carnarvon shaft 12 ft dia (3.65m) to Dunsil then 14 ft (4.26m) and No2 Portland shaft 14 ft dia (4.26m). The shafts were named after the local dignitaries, Earl of Carnarvon and the Duke of Portland. The No3 shaft at 14 ft dia (4.26m) was sunk in 1886 to the Low Main at 475¾ yds (435m). Shaft positions: SK45NE No1 shaft E447286, N358380, No2 shaft E447324, N358386, No3 shaft E447244, N358369, at 472’ 5” (144m) above sea level.

Seams worked: Many seams had been worked at this pit in an effort to prolong its life. Originally sunk to the

  • Top Hard coal soft 11” (0.28m)
  • Coal hards 24½” (0.62m)
  • Coal soft 17½” (0.44m) at 144 yards (131.5m) and worked from 1879 to 30/5/1905
  • Dunsil 2’ 4½” (0.72m) at 166 yards (151.75m) 1939- Jan 1946 closed due to water problems
  • 2nd Waterloo 2’ 2½” (0.67m) at 203 yards (185.5m) 1906-25/9/1934
  • DeepSoft coal 1’ 1” (0.33m), dirt 3” (0.08m), coal 8½” (0.22m), dirt ½” (0.01m), coal 1¾” (0.04m) at 318 yards (290.75m) 1920 closed, re-opened1942-24/2/1945 closed due to poor seam section, re-opened 1951-1952 closed due to bad roof conditions, 1966, Feb 1967-10/10/1968, 1975-Jan 1976 -1979, 1981-5/2/82 due to bad roof
  • Deep Hard 3’ 7” (1.09m) coal, 2½” (0.08m) black bat, at 359 yards (328.25m) -1879 (uneconomic), 1887-1931 stalls, closed due to interaction and seam thinning, re-opened 1940-1944, 1949-1952 closed due to ventilation problems, re-opened again 1974-15/6/1979 (uneconomic)
  • First Piper coal bright 1’ 9½” (0.55m), inferior coal and pyrites 8½” (0.22m) at 372 yards (340m) 1924-1929 closed due to being unprofitable, re-opened 1945-12/1/1976, closed temporarily then re-opened 1978-17/9/1981 the last remaining face, abandoned 20/5/1982 economically exhausted
  • Low Main or Tupton 4’ 5” (1.35m) at 412 yards (376.75m) worked continuously 1879-8/3/1951 when the seam area within the boundaries was exhausted, Yard seam 3ft (0.91m) at 446 yards (407.75m) June 1977-16/12/1981 closed due to water problems from other collieries making working hazardous and Blackshale tried -1951. Shaft depth 413 yards (378m).

In 1876 William Muschamp, former Mayor of Gateshead and William Bainbridge proposed the sinking of the pit to replace Old Hucknall pit sunk in 1761. It was named New Hucknall to distinguish it from the Hucknall colliery at the bottom of the hill on Blackwell Road, opposite the Miners’ Arms Public House. However as will be noted there were several New Hucknall pits in the past (or several Hucknall New), the last one closing in the late 1860s.

In the 1890s the Company built Newcastle Street adjacent to the Working Men’s Club and Reading Room. In 1900 the owners of the mine registered as a new company.

Jan 1901, Aaron Stewart was Secretary of the Nottinghamshire Miners Association. In 1919 Charles Bunfield became the new Union Secretary. In November 1918 there had been a strike over the introduction of electric hand lamps. The men had been pressing the company to issue battery lamps since early 1917 in place of the flame lamps due to high nystagmus cases. By March 1919 all the men had been issued with one. In 1934 the pit was on a 3 day week due to Government quotas and dismissal notices were signed by Percy Muschamp to all 1,000 employees, but after a deputation lobbied the Minister of Mines Ernest Brown at the House of Commons and won a last minute reprieve but only on a day to day basis.

Miners eating their snap in the 1930s and a collier chopping out the kerf are shown in the photos.

A Greaves wash box installed in 1931. 2 new boilers added. All the output was from Low Main in 1933. Screens changed from compressed air operational to electric in 1935. Mechanisation at the coal face did not begin until 1942 when compressed air operated coal cutters were converted to electric 1944 but it was in the mid 1950s that mechanisation ‘proper’ came to the pit with the introduction of cutter-loader machines. In 1945 there was an amalgamation with Blackwell Colliery Co forming the New Hucknall & Blackwell Collieries Ltd (NH & B Ltd). A new pit bottom was made at No3 shaft for Piper seam. A new pit top was constructed at No2 shaft in 1946. From 1st January 1947 when the mines were nationalised New Hucknall became a unit of East Midlands No4 Area with HQ based at Huthwaite adjacent to the colliery.

Two huge chimneys as well as the 3 headstocks dominated the skyline of this colliery. For many years the tips smouldered being on fire from spontaneous combustion of the small coals deposited in the past, however the resulting red shale was sold. The tip was landscaped and part grassed and leased to a farmer who grazed his cattle there, well before the pit closed.

Surface locos 4’ 8½” gauge:

  • No1 Portland 0-6-0ST 1878
  • New Hucknall No4 0-6-0ST 1905
  • Carnarvon 0-6-0ST 1901
  • Stirling Castle 4wVBT 1952
  • Devonshire 0-6-0ST 1900
  • No1 0-6-0ST 1905
  • 0-6-0ST 1907
  • Swanwick Collieries No5 0-6-0ST 1940
  • 4wDH 1961
  • 36 0-6-0ST 1945
  • Lesley 0-6-0DM 1960.

Pithead baths and canteen and medical centre complex built April 1954 to July 1955. Prior to this many miners were to be found travelling to and from work in their pit clothes generally on the green 101 Mansfield District buses to Sutton.

No1 shaft was defunct by 1956 and was capped. Section by Louis Edmond Sidebottom (21/08/1905): New Hucknall Common coal (High Hazles) 2’ 4” (0.71m) at 54 yards (49.4m), 6” (0.15m) coal at 133 yds 1’ 7” (123m),coal and batt (Comb) 1’ 3” (0.38m) at 136 yds 2’ 10” (127m), Top Hard top soft 11” (0.28m), best hard 24½” (0.62m), bottom soft 17½” (0.44m) at 140 yds (128m), Dunsil 2’ 4½” (0.72m) at 161 yd 2 ft (147.8m), rock at 164 yds 1ft (150m).

A connection was made to Langton for water passage (the water arriving at Langton pumping station in Oct 1986). An accidental connection to Bentinck was made in Jan 1965. Water not raised at the shafts migrated into the water lodge at Bentinck by various routes.


Ponies Still Used For Supplies

Ponies were still being used for supplies up to 1974, the last pit to dispense with them in South Nottinghamshire Area. During the strike period the surveyors were one team that fed and watered them, and included David Clarke, Assistant Surveyor (later Mining Records Officer).
2 ton mine cars were raised at No3 shaft. A profit of £1,727,000 was made in 1980/81.


Rescue Team Assisted on Heating

A heating in late 1979 required the help of the Rescue team and trained men from other collieries to contain it (Calverton for example). All the men wanting to stay in the industry at closure were offered jobs at other pits.

The shafts were filled and capped and the headgears demolished by 1983.
Manpower: …New Hucknall Colliery Co: 1894: No1: 299 Top Hard, 70 s/f , No3: 361 Deep Hard, 67 s/f, & 408 Tupton, 65 s/f, 1,068 total u/g, 202 s/f, (1,270 men)

  • 1895: No1: 313 TH, 64 s/f, No3: 375 DH, 68 s/f, No3: 391 T, 57s/f, 1,268 men
  • 1896: No1: 246 TH, 70 s/f, No3: 387 DH, 74 s/f, No3: 402 T, 71 s/f
  • 1897: No1: 304 TH, 72 s/f, No3: 419 DH, 86 s/f, No3: 391 T, 86 s/f
  • 1898: No1: 291 TH, 71 s/f, No3: 391 DH, 91 s/f, No3: 396 T, 90 s/f
  • 1899: No1: 277 TH, 65 s/f, No3: 400 DH, 91 s/f, No3: 411 T, 91 s/f
  • 1900: No1: 234 TH, 68 s/f, No3: 454 DH, 99 s/f, No3: 414 T, 91 s/f, 1,360 men
  • 1901: No1: 197 TH, 65 s/f, No3: 472 DH, 103 s/f, No3: 467 T, 108 s/f
  • 1902: No1: 134 TH, 59 s/f, No3: 560 DH, 94 s/f, No3: 383 T, 121 s/f
  • 1903: No1: 60 TH, 30 s/f, No3: 530 DH, 133 s/f, No3: 358 T, 92 s/f, 1,233 men
  • 1904: No1: 65 TH, 36 s/f, No3: 485 DH, 109 s/f, No3: 428 T, 118 s/f
  • 1905: No1: 25 sinking deeper: 12 s/f, No2: 500 DH, 101 s/f, No3: 633 T, 140 s/f, 1,411 men
  • 1906: No1: 61 Top Hard and Waterloo, 5 s/f, No2: 555 DH, 117 s/f, No3: 626 T, 132 s/f
  • 1907: No1: 203 (including my Granddad Eli White, coming from Silverwood, South Yorkshire) Waterloo, 24 s/f, No2: 589 DH, 106 s/f, No3 645 T, 133 s/f
  • 1908: No1: 189 W, 36 s/f, No2: 639 DH, 108 s/f, No3: 656 T, 142 s/f
  • 1909: No1: 206 W, 49 s/f, No2: 616 DH, 99 s/f, No3: 674 T, 170 s/f
  • 1911: No1: 403 W, 88 s/f, No2: 627 DH, 108 s/f, No3: 654 T, 160 s/f, 2,040 men
  • 1912: No1: 434 W, No2: 630 DH, No3: 649 T, 329 s/f
  • 1913: No1: 531 W, No2: 659 DH, No3: 649 T, 372 s/f, 2,211 men
  • 1914: No1: 573 W, No2: 651 DH, No3: 631 T, 412 s/f
  • 1915: No1: 599 W, No2: 559 DH, No3: 538 T, 320 s/f, 2,016 men
  • 1916: No1: 626 W, No2: 590 DH, No3: 565 T, 371 s/f
  • 1917: No1: 693 W, No2: 597 DH, No3: 545 T, 361 s/f
  • 1918: No1: 721 W, No2: 575 DH, No3: 510 T, 355 s/f
  • 1919: No1: 755 W, No2: 620 DH, No3: 547 T, 400 s/f
  • 1920: No1: 764 W, No2: 652 DH, No3: 546 T, 400 s/f, 2,362 men (max)
  • 1921: No1: 615 W, No2: 614 DH, No3: 434 T, 364 s/f
  • 1922: No1: No2: No3: 1,581 W, DH, T, 325 s/f
  • 1923: No1: 595 W, No2: 594 DH, No3: 443 Tupton, now Low Main, 341 s/f, 2,073 men
  • 1924: No1: No2: No3: 1,598 W, DH, LM, 350 s/f
  • 1925: No1: No2: No3: 1,464, W, DH, Piper start, LM, 357 s/f, 1,821 men
  • 1926: 1,360, W, DH, P and LM, 320 s/f, 1,680 men
  • 1927: 1,391 W, DH, P, LM, 348 s/f, 1,739 men
  • 1928: 1,210 W, DH, P, LM, 347 s/f, 1,557 men
  • 1929: 1,128 W, DH, Piper fin, LM, 336 s/f, 1,464 men
  • 1930: 1,115 W, DH, LM, 348 s/f, 1,463 men
  • 1931: 699 W, DH fin, LM, 238 s/f, 937 total
  • 1932: 781 W and LM, 254 s/f
  • 1933: 828 W, LM, 268 s/f, 1,096 men
  • 1934: 581 Waterloo fin, LM, 209 s/f
  • 1935: 510 Low Main, 211 s/f, 721 men
  • 1936: 358 LM, 188 s/f, 546 total
  • 1937: 405 LM, 195 s/f
  • 1938: 381 LM, 185 s/f, 566 total
  • 1940: 507 Low Main, Dunsil, Deep Hard, 210 s/f, 717 men
  • 1941: 514 LM, D, DH, 230 s/f
  • 1942: 516 Low Main, Dunsil, Deep Hard, Deep Soft, 237 s/f
  • 1943: 491 LM, D, DH, DS, 168 s/f
  • 1944: 493 LM, D, DH, DS, and Piper, 177 s/f
  • 1945: NH and B Collieries Ltd 1945: 466 D, DS, P, LM,170 s/f, 636 men
  • 1946: 453 D, DH, P, LM, 170 s/f.
  • Coal ploughTonnage and Manpower NCB: No4 Area EM Div: 1947: 193,086 tons, 590 men
  • 1948: 221,042 tons, 646 men
  • 1949: 233,333 tons, 641 men
  • 1950: 245,773 tons, 650 men
  • 1951: 256,379 tons, 686 men
  • 1952: 285,979 tons, 700 men
  • 1953: 295,315 tons, 704 men
  • 1954: 288,282 tons, 685 men
  • 1955: 286,819 tons, 672 men
  • 1956: 308,293 tons, 646 men
  • 1957: 352,046 tons, 640 men
  • 1958: 342,791 tons, 637 men
  • 1959: 241,447 tons, 616 men
  • 1960: 259,178 tons, 602 men
  • 1961: 279,757 tons, 610 men
  • 1962: 320,775 tons, 613 men
  • 1963: 348,283 tons, 617 men
  • 1963/64: 350,642 tons, 623 men
  • 1964/65: 365,631 tons, 658 men
  • 1965/66: 365,538 tons, 673 men
  • 1966/67: 334,106 tons, 688 men
  • 1968/69: 392,775 tons, 676 men
  • 1969/70: 435,436 tons, 654 men
  • 1970/71: 387,885 tons, 671 men
  • 1971/72: 307,220 tons, 686 men
  • 1972/73: 357,066 tons, 682 men
  • 1973/74: 244,072 tons, 686 men
  • 1974/75: 286,960 tons, 683 men
  • 1975/76: 326,113 tons, 698 men
  • 1976/77: 355,230 tons, 693 men
  • 1977/78: (364,398) tons 370,247 tonnes, 708 men (max)
  • 1978/79: 423,353 tonnes, 685 men
  • 1979/80: 456,730 tonnes, 645 men
  • 1980/81: 503,071 tonnes, 612 men
  • 1981/82: 259,196 tonnes, 503 men.
    Colliery closed for production Feb
    1982. Lyn Haywood (7866), Manager made the last ride up the shaft on 27th July 1982.

 

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