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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Chimneys
1965
1967
1969

  1967    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9 

1967 - Page 6


No6 Area

Alternative
Alternative to Explosive
The Headquarters offices for No6 Area NCB was located adjacent to Bestwood colliery from 1947 to 1967, then for South Nottinghamshire Area from 1967 until the reorganisation when South Nottinghamshire and North Nottinghamshire Areas were amalgamated in 1985, when the new Nottinghamshire Area was located at the old North Nottinghamshire Area HQ at Edwinstowe. The winding house and headgear and renovated engine of the closed Bestwood colliery became an attraction in later years as the site was turned into Bestwood Country Park.


Alternatives To Explosives

Cardox and hydrox shells began to be used at certain pits instead of explosives. The photo shows a miner inserting the device into a shot hole in readiness for ‘firing’.


Training

Training Regulations 1967, introduced because of more disciplines, such as locomotives, face development, colliery Specialists viz Ventilation Officer, Training Officer, Dust Control Officer, Safety Officer.


HM Inspectorate

George DE Rowland was appointed Divisional Inspector of Mines East Midlands Division from 15th August 1967, replacing James Calder.


Parliament

President of Board of Trade, Anthony Crossland, (Lab), 29th Aug 1967 –1969.


Langton Closed After 123 Years And Merged With Kirkby Summit

There was an underground inter-colliery connection made in August 1967 at the Blackshale horizon between Langton and Kirkby (South Nottinghamshire) and Langton sunk 1844-1846 by Coke and Co was closed after 123 years and absorbed under Kirkby management from 12th November 1967.
No7 shaft was 211 yards (192m) deep and 8 feet (2.43m) diameter and No8 shaft 489 yards (445m) deep and 16 feet (4.88m) diameter and 357’ 6” (109m) above sea level. Deep Soft at 339½ yards (310m).
The pit was located near Langton Hall and east of Pinxton Green.
Shaft positions: SK45NE, No7 447467, 355058, No8 447494, 355061.
There was another connection, this one to Bentinck driven at 1in3 in June 1954.
A pillar was left in the 2nd Waterloo for the old Portland shafts in 1955/56, position 447890, 354796, 176m deep and Pump shaft 447908, 354802, depth 153.5m.
A plough to scrape coal onto the AFC behind the shearer cutting machine was invented at the pit and was introduced to other collieries because of its success.
Water from surrounding collieries was collected and pumped to the surface then later allowed to flow through to Bentinck.
Men from the handfilled Waterloo faces were transferred to power loaded faces in the Blackshale seam.

Seams worked:

  • Top Hard top softs 8½” (0.21m)
  • Lish 1½” (0.04m)
  • Hard open grained coal 1’ 8” (0.51m)
  • Hard close grained coal 1’ 4” (0.40m)
  • Fireclay-16/9/1890 exhausted
  • Deep Soft – Lady Day 1926
  • Waterloo 1901
  • (2nd) Waterloo 1901-18/11/66, coupled to Brookhill
  • Piper – finished 18/6/1928, abandoned 17/5/1929
  • Low Main
  • Silkstone -1967.


Langton Colliery

Manpower:

  • J Coke and Co 1842-1896
  • Pinxton Collieries Ltd - 1946
  • Langton Manpower: Pinxton Collieries Ltd: 1894: No7 Deep Soft 272, s/f 74, No8 Deep Hard 201, s/f 90, total 637 men
  • 1895: 613 men
  • 1900: 676 men
  • 1903: No7- Deep Soft 358, s/f 100, No8 Waterloo 104, s/f 33, No9 Deep Hard 324, s/f 84, total 1,000
  • 1905: 974 men
  • 1911: Deep Hard 343, s/f 70, total 413 men
  • 1912: No7 219 Deep Soft, 47 s/f, No8 368 Waterloo, 92 s/f, No9 313 Deep Hard, 84 s/f
  • 1913: 411 men
  • 1914: 204 DS, 66 s/f, 387 W, 91 s/f, 285 DH, 80 s/f
  • 1915: 883 men
  • 1916: 175 DS, 62 s/f, 306 W, 83 s/f, 194 DH, 83 s/f
  • 1917: 209 DS, 74 s/f, 337 W, 85 s/f, 106 DH, 82, s/f
  • 1918: 171 DS, 72 s/f, 367 W, 91 s/f, 76 DH, 74 s/f
  • 1919: 211 DS, 64 s/f, 414 W, 112 s/f, 62 DH, 78 s/f
  • 1920: 201 DS, 62 s/f, 412 W, 96 s/f, 73 DH, 74 s/f
  • 1921: 190 DS and DH, 60 s/f, 400 W, 122 s/f, 13 Piper
  • 1922: 201 DS and DH, 362 W, 39 P, 164 s/f
  • 1923: 168 DS, 379 W, 45 P, 162 s/f
  • 1924: 128 DS, 421 W, 98 P, 180 s/f
  • 1925: 12 DS, 414 W, 168 P, 176 s/f, 768 men
  • 1926:12 Deep Soft abandoned, 440 W, 199 P, 192 s/f
  • 1927: 438 W, 180 P, 158 s/f
  • 1928:475 W, 186 P, 123 s/f, 684 men
  • 1929: 459 W, Piper abandoned, 85 s/f
  • 1930: 416 W, 92 s/f, 508 men
  • 1931: 428 W, 101 s/f
  • 1932: 416 W, 83 s/f
  • 1933: 415 W, 107 s/f, 522 men
  • 1934: 405 W, 124 s/f
  • 1935: 385 W, 122 s/f, 507 men
  • 1936: 385 W, 127 s/f
  • 1937: No7 developing 21, 10 s/f, No8, 410 W, 163 s/f
  • 1938: 22 dev, 26 s/f, 421 W, 167 s/f
  • 1939: 20 dev, 28 s/f, 415 W, 155 s/f
  • 1940: 8 Low Main, 38 s/f, 412 W, 140 s/f, 598 men
  • 1941: 8 LM, 40 s/f, 426 W, 151 s/f
  • 1942: 418 Low Main, Silkstone and Waterloo, 296 s/f
  • 1943: 395 u/g, 209 s/f
  • 1944: 271 LM and S, 107 s/f, 373 W, 134 s/f
  • 1945: 640 Silkstone and Waterloo, 220 s/f, 860 men
  • 1946: 845 men app.

Tonnage and Manpower NCB: No4 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 301,186 tons, 817 men
  • 1948: 332,528 tons, 860 men
  • 1949: 369,389 tons, 928 men
  • 1950: 459,977 tons, 1,073 men
  • 1951: 519,794 tons (max), 1,114 men
  • 1952: 502,310 tons, 1,088 men
  • 1953: 438,196 tons, 1,061 men
  • 1954: 433,498 tons, 1,022 men
  • 1955: 457,312 tons, 1,025 men
  • 1956: 441,505 tons, 983 men
  • 1957: 460,153 tons, 958 men
  • 1958: 475,149 tons, 941 men
  • 1959: 505,641 tons, 928 men
  • 1960: 462,231 tons, 905 men
  • 1961: 463,438 tons, 889 men
  • 1962: 430,425 tons, 876 men
  • 1963: 466,447 tons, 919 men
  • 1963/64: 456,389 tons, 932 men
  • 1964/65: 417,110 tons, 918 men
  • 1965/66: 403,628 tons, 882 men
  • 1966/67: 379,334 tons, 777 men. Colliery closed August 1968.

Agents:

  • Walter Salmond Agent 1887-1895 (Pinxton Coal Co and Coke and Co)
  • Henry Stevenson (1575) Agent 1896-1900 left to Linby
  • Bernard Madew (2404) 1900-Mar 1911 (when he left to South Africa)
  • Henry Stevenson (1575) Agent again 1911-1923 (Pinxton Collieries Ltd), returned from Linby
  • Percy F Day (3295) Agent 1923-1946
  • F Donald Severn (977) Agent 1947-1952, (later Area General Manager No4 Area).

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers:

  • Alex L Middleton (3342) Sub-Area Manager 1952-1955
  • Humphrey F Watson (4986) Group Manager 1955-
  • Les R Watkins (4376) Group Manager

Managers for Langton:

  • Sam Alsop pre 1883-1895 (Coke and Co)
  • Henry Stevenson Manager (1575) 1897-1900, left to Linby Colliery Co
  • Bernard Madew (2404) 1900-1905 (Pinxton Coal Co)
  • R Woods (688) 1905-1906
  • J Trueman (1333) 1906-1916
  • John Southern (3945) 1916-1925
  • John Mullins (1552) 1925-1936
  • Les FM Ackroyd (1937) 1936-1952 (transferred to Bentinck)
  • Joe J Brealey (1097) 1952-1957 (transferred from Pleasley)
  • Bernard Gascoyne (6286) 1958-1964
  • Robert (Bob) Haworth (5068) 1964-1965 (transferred from Shirland, transferred to Bentinck)
  • Len A Peach (6237) 1965-1967 (transferred from Blackwell B Winning, transferred to dual Deputy Manager Moorgreen on closure, due to lack of position of Manager post). The Colliery now came under Kirkby Manager Arthur Gidlow (5896) 1968.

Undermanagers for Langton:

  • William Barlow (286 service) pre 1887-1895
  • Job Smith (288 service) pre 1887-1910
  • R Bexton 1902-1904 (2nd)
  • T Savage 1904-06 (2nd)
  • A Greasley (2nd) 1908-1910
  • O Houfton (2nd) 1911-1912
  • Jas Hoten (2nd) 1911-1945
  • W Smith (2nd) 1912-1927
  • Job Smith (288) temp 1923, Ernie Kirkwood (2nd) 1944-1962
  • Wilf G Shelton (3736) (only had one eye) 1945-1967
  • Joe H Cosford (4900 – 2nd ) 1950-1951
  • A Severn (4963) 1964-1967.
  • Job Smith (288) was in charge of Langton No7 sinking to Deep Soft 1883/84. In 1890 he was Undermanager in Deep Hard seam after the Top Hard finished, He was Undermanager again at No8 shaft sinking to Waterloo. He was in charge of Brookhill single shaft sinking 1908-1910 down to the Low Main then to Silkstone at 417 yards (381m). In 1885 Job earned £1.13s.0d (£1.65p) per week out of which he paid 3s.6d (17½p) per week rent and 6d (2½p) club money. After supervising heading out he returned to Langton in 1910 but he also continued at Brookhill until EE Stokes took over in 1912. He still rode Langton pit when he was 80 years old.

Surveyors included:

  • Geoffrey Blood (3177 1st Class) -1930s
  • Leslie H Watson (578) Surveyor to the Pinxton Collieries Co 1930s-1947 (appointed Area Chief Surveyor No4 Area, Huthwaite HQ)
  • George Davies (2358) (promoted from Teversal/Silverhill 1951, transferred to HQ on closure, temp Kirkby 1968/69).

Cost Clerk: John Banks, (ex RAF), -1967 promoted to Teversal Group Costs.

Fatal Accidents Langton: Francis Lee (16) fall of roof 1/4/1851

  • John Byron (12) fell down the shaft 1/7/1851
  • Sam Elliott (26) fall of roof 10/12/1851
  • Thomas Oaten (?) fall of roof 17/8/1852
  • Thomas Beardsmore (?) fell into winding machinery 14/7/1853
  • William Robinson (30) fell down the shaft 30/11/1855
  • Sam Robinson (?) fell down the shaft 10/4/1856
  • George Street (16) ? 21/11/1857
  • Joseph Hayes (16) fall of roof 10/3/1860
  • William Cockayne (15) fall of roof 8/10/1866
  • John Sadler (16) fall of coal 2/9/1867
  • William Green (35) fell down the shaft 31/12/1869
  • James Artcliff (53) fall of coal 27/12/1871
  • Matthew Lee (41) crushed by wagons on the surface 24/11/1873
  • John Walvin (19) fall of coal 1/10/1875
  • George Sheppard (47) crushed by the cage 26/12/1878
  • Albert Brownlow (23) fall of roof 21/1/1889
  • James Hudson (30) injured his arm whilst riding down the shaft and it would appear that his arm was outside of the cage and it struck the side of the shaft on Friday 24/5/1895. It took almost 12 hours to get him to the General Hospital by cart being admitted at 6pm. and he died from septicaemia 3/6/1895
  • William Watson (41) and Geo Caulton (33) both killed when a compressor burst on the surface 10/4/1903
  • John Henry Wardle (20) run over by tubs 16/6/1909
  • John Arthur Pembleton (15) crushed by tubs 7/2/1910
  • Sam Brotherhood (33) suffocated by shotfiring fumes 22/7/1910
  • Thomas Bradley (60) ? 20/5/1913
  • Alfred Lowe (14) crushed by tubs 15/9/1914
  • William Henry Hartshaw (60) fall of roof 22/11/1916, died 9/12/1916
  • Mark Wood (42) fall of roof 14/5/1917
  • Ben Green (64) caught in a coal cutter 27/8/1919
  • Bernard Marriott (14) crushed by a pony 21/1/1919
  • Richard Evans (73) injured himself lifting a tub 19/7/1919, died 5/8/1920
  • Tom Vines Elliott (47) fall of coal 6/8/1920
  • William Henry Wright (41) fall of coal 6/1/1923
  • Arthur Starr (17) crushed by tubs 14/11/1923
  • Thomas Raine Mathie (25) fall of roof 12/10/1926, died 14/19/1926
  • William Willis (58) crushed by wagons on the surface 22/12/1927
  • Arthur Jeffries (47) killed by a drop chair at the surface 26/9/1929
  • Ben Howell (39) crushed by a girder on the surface 14/4/1931
  • Geo William Dobbs (29) run over by a loco on the surface 9/4/1935
  • Edmund or Edwin Smith (35) fall of roof 23/1/1939
  • George Albert Beal (28) and Sidney Hancock (28) both killed under a fall of roof 13/12/1939
  • Alfred Young (36) fall of roof 13/11/1940
  • John Albert Key (34) fall of roof 1/1/1945
  • William Henry Earp (61) ? 12/3/1947
  • Dove Fletcher (25) fall of coal 15/10/1951
  • Wilfred Dakin (45) 6/7/1952
  • John Alfred Hughes (28) fall of roof 28/1/1953
  • Thomas Elliott (50) fall of roof in 1939, died 8/4/1954
  • John William Henry Hill (50) 12/5/1954
  • John or Thomas William Vincent (46) shotfiring accident 3/7/1957.
  • Walter Tryner (48) died 23/9/1958 of natural causes
  • Alfred Ball (54) died 20/6/1958 of natural causes
  • Wallace Clyde Dye (47) died 23/3/1960, open verdict, died from shotfiring fumes.

Langton was kept on as a pumping pit to protect Bentinck, the water issuing from Pinxton and Brookhill mines.
In 1926 a borehole was drilled from the bottom of nearby Green shaft at Top Hard level to the Waterloo level 63 yards (58m) below.
A dam was constructed called the Green Dam in the Waterloo seam and a 6” (0.15m) pipe from the borehole conveyed water to the Waterloo pit bottom and up No8 shaft (Langton) to the Top Hard horizon.
In 1963 the 6” (0.15m) pipe was fractured and subsequently the Green Dam was no longer able to retain pressure. This caused silting up of part of the Green shaft pipe range and 150 yards (137m) had to be disconnected which then caused a fairly large area to become waterlogged.
On 16th June 1965 the Green shaft along with several others was filled in with concrete and capped by the Ministry of Transport during the construction of the M1 motorway that passed through the area.

 

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