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Mines Rescue Vehicles - Page 1

Page 1

Vehicles   1     2     3     4     5     6     7  


Mansfield Woodhouse station superintendent
J.G. Huskisson stands by a Standard motor car
c. 1912. There was always a canary, in a cage, in his car ready for an emergency call out.

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Fire Engine. A 55/60 horsepower Leyland motor was installed for dealing with colliery surface fires. It carried a first aid reel, comprising tank holding 40 gallons of water, hose and small jet. There were also fittings for connecting to street hydrants. For taking water from a large reservoir or a collapsible dam a 5-in. suction hose fitted with strainer was used. A Rees Rotourbo twin impeller multistage turbine pump was connected to the engine.

This was as efficient as the best reciprocating pump, and had many advantages, such as continuous flow, absence of valves,bypass, and all reciprocating wearing parts; and the combination of the engine and this pump was the best for constant speed and power, with variable head, suction lift and volume.
There were also fittings for connecting to street hydrants. 'Betsy' is seen above leaving Ilkeston Mines Rescue Station, Manners Road.
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The size of the pump was designed to deliver 425 gallons per minute at 120 lbs. pressure per sq. in. with a lift of 10 feet; to give a maximum lift of 28 feet measured to the outlet of the pump; and to give a maximum pressure of 160 lbs. Per sq. in. A hose locker was provided for carrying 150 feet of 2¾-in. internal diameter canvas delivery hose in 75 feet lengths and fitted with 2½-in. male / female instantaneous couplings. An "Ajax" ladder capable of extending to 30 feet was carried on standards over the engine.


One of the first central rescue stations was at Mansfield Woodhouse.
Here you can see their
fire engine. Taken around 1914.

 

Mansfiled Woodhouse
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Delivered 30th November 1951
- Installed in each rescue vehicle leaving the stations now are portable radio sets by which they can keep in touch with the parent station. Even when the rescue vehicles go out on routine jobs at the pits, they are now calling Ilkeston Rescue Station, to make sure that radio contact is possible.
There were always two canaries, in cages, in the van, ready for emergency call out.

interior of van
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Typical call outs, written at the time by Les Havill
27/12/51 - Bentink, two men gassed behind fire 02/08/53 - Swadlingcote, underground fire
08/08/52 - Bentink, underground fire --/08/53 - Linby, underground fire, 12 days
15/03/53 - Ripley, gob fire, 9 days --/07/54 - Hucknall, gas accumulation
08/07/53 - Bretby, underground fire  


Ilkeston Mines Rescue men with their ambulance.

Top-Les Havill, Benny, Sheff, Tommy Rainbird
Middle- ? Arthur Clark
Bottom- Harry Newton

Second from the left is Benny, he, came over from Hoekes of Holland to install the liquid air plant.

Typical call outs, written at the time by Les Havill
30/04/40 - Mapperley, one man injured 07/12/50 - Mapperley, 7 days, gob fire
20/07/40 - To hospital, 2 men burned 12/03/51 - Creswell, 5 days, re-opening pit
15/09/45 - To canal, child revived with reviver 19/03/51 - Denby, 3 days, gob fire
06/09/49 - Denby, two men gassed 30/04/53 - Merry Lees, gob fire


Winders
Philips Winder
Scammel Mountaineer

The Winder a 'Scammel Mountaineer',
Philips pride and joy, seen here working at Limby.

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The first van where they could sit down to get changed.
There were always two canaries, in cages, in the van, ready for emergency call out.

Yellow Peril 1973

Paul Straw, Ray Havill, Alan Hutsby, Pete Searson,
John Parkin, John Newton, John Dawes, George Brock.
Simon and Wayne,1974
Ray's boys, Simon and Wayne Havill, stand in front of the 'Yellow Peril' bought in 1973.


PVO 763L

A764 DNU

MSF 676T

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