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Known Pneumoconiosis Cases 1948 - 1981

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Known Pneumoconiosis Cases

Besides the dangers to life and limb from mining accidents other factors namely disease, caused hardship and death to the mining community. Non fatal diseases were Bursitis, or Beat knee or Elbow. Hernias caused by lifting and pushing heavy objects, also Dermatitis a skin disease caused by exposure to water or chemicals in materials used in the industry. An extremely distressing condition was Nystagmus, an uncontrollable oscillation of the eyeballs caused by working in dim light during the earlier years when candles or oil lamps were the only illumination underground. This condition ceased gradually with the introduction of electric lamps and electric roadway lighting. Over the years these conditions became recognised as Industrial diseases for which compensation could be claimed. The killer which is still causing deaths was dust, the number of victims will never be known and the mining unions with the help of M Ps in parliament fought for years to have the condition recognised in law and made compensable.

It was not until 1912 that the medical profession agreed that dust in many industries as well as coalmining were affecting the workpeople in those industries that legislation passed through parliament. The term Silicosis was used, among the many irritants to the lungs silica had to be present which excluded most coal mines other than those working Anthracite coal. The breakthrough came in 1942 and passed in to law in 1943 the doctors had researched all their data and agreed a new terminology for dust related conditions to be called Pneumoconiosis. With the establishment of the National Coal Board in 1948 a Pneumoconiosis panel was set up in Sheffield to adjudicate on individual claims.

Pneumoconiosis is a distressing condition in its later stages and many sufferers could only breathe with the assistance of an oxygen cylinder and mask movement being very difficult their last days confined to a bed or chair

In 1993 British Coal introduced payments for persons who had worked in the pits more than twenty years and suffered an agreed percentage of breathing difficulties due to Bronchitis and Emphysema.

During research on this section from the Nottingham City Coroners closed records and odd newspaper items.

Usually death is given as Bronchitis and Emphysema with Pneumoconiosis a contributing cause. All persons named have a degree of pneumoconiosis on their death certificates as given by a coroner.

As the older generation of miners fades away this scourge will pass with them soon to be history, as will they and their industry.


 Annual deaths from Pneumoconiosis dust disease United Kingdom

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

261

254

267

199

213

254

297

255

221

                 

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

243

218

201

184

153

142

129

132

121

                 

2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

136

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PNEUMOCONIOSIS

Dust disease in coalmining was 'the most significant of Britain's occupational health tragedies' and is detailed in McIvor and Johnston's book, Miners' Lung. From 1918, silicosis was a 'prescribed' industrial disease (and sufferers eligible for benefit) but relatively few incapacitated miners fitted the exact criteria.

Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis (CWP), another occupational lung disease, was eventually recognised as a prescribed industrial disease in 1943. Miners with this had to leave the industry but were allowed back from 1948, when the more seriously incapacitated could work in 'approved dust conditions' on the surface, while those in the early stages could work in 'approved dust conditions' underground.

CWP was responsible for 700-800 deaths per year in the late 1940s, peaking at over 1,600 per year from the early 1950s to the late 1960s. Between 1930 and 1990, the total recorded deaths from CWP were more than 40,000; this is an underestimate as many early cases were misdiagnosed. Significantly, three to four times that number of miners suffered from 'progressive massive fibrosis', the most disabling stage of CWP.

Under union pressure, a government scheme in 1974 provided lump sum compensation for certified pneumoconiotics. But it was not until 1993 (when most of the industry had been shut) that chronic bronchitis and emphysema became prescribed industrial diseases for coalminers who had worked 20 years underground (two years as a screen worker on the surface was equivalent to one underground). By the 2004 deadline to register for compensation under the 1998 bronchitis and emphysema litigation against British Coal, some 570,000 claims (more than half by families of deceased miners) had been made!

The miners' unions had campaigned for decades for recognition of the industry's occupational lung diseases and had challenged orthodox medical knowledge in the process. They had also argued for improved dust-suppression techniques and legislation to back these up. With increasing mechanisation and use of power-tools in coal mines, the dust problem worsened in the post-war years. The Coal Mines (Respirable Dust) Regulations 1975 imposed a standard but problems of measurement made it almost unenforceable.

The above section is transcribed from Britain at work 1945-1995 Voices from the workplace.




If you believe you are suffering from illness or disease as a result of working in the coal industry
contact the miners help centre nearest to you:


Known Pneumoconiosis and Silicosis Casess
1948

Name

Age

Colliery

Date

Arthur Swift
29, Central Avenue
Unknown

65

Unnamed Died 12/12/1937
Silicosis
Peter Gibson Bailey
15, Saville Row
Bilsthorpe

55

Bilsthorpe Died 08/01/1946

Alfred Brown
63, Crompton Road
Bilsthorpe

44

Bilsthorpe

Died 08/02/1948

Stanley Hollins
71, Church Street
Bilsthorpe

62

Bilsthorpe

Died 23/03/1948

Henry Green
63 Askern Road
Doncaster Yorkshire

67

Unnamed

Died 21/04/1948

Frederick Simpson
27, Furlong Avenue
Arnold

48

Unnamed Died 21/04/1948

Stephen Cresswell
189, South Street
Eastwood

71

Unnamed

Died 28/10/1948
Silicosis

Robert Green
10, Carlton Hill
Carlton

61

Gedling

Died 07/05/1952

John Wrath
28, Church Lane
Old Brinsley

67

Unnamed

Died 23/08/1953

James Rowbotham
183, Denewood Crescent
Bestwood
46
Unnamed Died 10/02/1954

George Brough
47, Beechdale Road
Nottingham

64

Unnamed

Died 13/08/1954

Thomas Lacey
7, Plumtre Close
Eastwood
53
Unnamed Died 15/08/1954

Thomas Johnson
St Christopher Street
Everton

71

Unnamed

Died 21/12/1954

John Richard Higton
158, Broad Lane
New Brinsley

73

Unnamed Died 21/10/1955

Lawrence Inger
10, Mandalay Street
Basford

56

Unnamed

Died 17/11/1955

Alfred Warsop
Laburnum Avenue
Sutton in Ashfield

61

Kirkby

Died 29/11/1955

Wyndham George Henry Read
3, Byron Street
Kirkby in Ashfield

61

Bentinck

Died 18/12/1955

John Hopewell
Rosemary Street
Mansfield

72

Unnamed

Died 17/10/1956

Leycester Percival L Wheeler
38 Eastdale Road
Bakersfield

65

Unnamed

Died 17/11/1956

William Osbourne
169. Newthorpe Common
Newthorpe

68

Unnamed

Died 00/12/1956

William Taylor
44, Nottingham Road
Loughborough

73

Unnamed

Died 15/12/1956

Montague Charles A Doleman
27, Browns Croft
Basford

61

Unnamed

Died 12/03/1957

Edward Brentnall
31, Mount Street
Mansfield

73

Unnamed

Reported to Coroner 27/07/1957

Fred Jones
27, The Crescent
Harworth

62

Unnamed

Reported to Coroner 12/09/1957

Frank Raine
Common Lane
Harworth

60

Unnamed

Reported to Coroner 18/09/1957

Thomas Henry Brown
Common Lane
Harworth

59

Unnamed

Reported to Coroner 21/09/1957

John William Lake
24, Kingston Road
Worksop

71

Unnamed

Reported to Coroner 26/09/1957

William James Austin Robin
16, Rutland Road
Nottingham

56

Unnamed

Died 24/11/1957

George Sanders
132 Newgate Road
Watnall

69

Unnamed

Died 25/11/1957

Joseph Lewis
173, Brightside Street
Stapleford

70

Unnamed Died 17/12/1957

William Ernest Thorpe
68, Windsor Street
Beeston

54

Unnamed

Reported to Coroner 27/12/1957