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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Book 6
Chimneys
1987
1989

1989 Pages   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10  
      11     12     13     14     15     16     17     18     19      

1989 - Page 10


Sutton Colliery Closed August 1989

- Continued -

Walt Adams was a ‘super chargeman’ for development headings at the pit and Andrew Stone’s right hand man.

Of course Sutton colliery will always be remembered for the tragic deaths of 5 men and the injuries to many others in the explosion on 21st February 1957 on 28s panel, Loader gate end in the Low Main seam. (refer to 1957 report Also Ian Winstanley's Pages). The surface position above was in the area of the Skegby Sewage works. The Low Main (or Tupton) was overlain by a band of mussels about 1 foot (0.30m) thick, termed the ‘cockleshell band’. The immediate roof was at times treacherous and also bad floor lift was experienced. All the seams were dipping steeply and on the sides of the Brimington anticline that passed through the take reached extreme gradients of up to 1in1.2. At times water was a problem that had to be dealt with.

A major fault of up to 500 feet (over 150m) running North West South East formed a natural barrier to the neighbouring mine New Hucknall at Huthwaite.

In 1945, before nationalisation it became part of the New Hucknall and Blackwell Colliery Co (NH and B Co) to December 1946.

From 1st January 1947 it became a unit of the National Coal Board No4 Area.

From April 1967, the colliery was administered by North Nottinghamshire Area until British Coal succeeded from May 1986.

An underground bunker was installed and a Merry-go-round loading system on surface.

Water was still issuing from the ‘Mary Ann’ well at the Top Hard level inset in the shaft I remember seeing it, and needed to be sealed off.

The shafts at 463 yards (423m) and 451 yards (412m) deep were both 14 feet (4.27m) diameter, brick lined except for 10 yards (9m) of tubbing above, and 10 yards (9m) of tubbing below the Top Hard inset in No1 shaft.

In the financial year 1988-89 the production reached 528,012 tonnes at 4.59 tonnes OMS. Record weekly output 15,090 tonnes.

An Anderson Mavor 420 shearer with powered roof supports was working on a gradient of 1in 2.4 on the Brimington anticline in the Deep Hard seam prior to abandonment.

The new Coal Prep Plant was operational from 1964 with a throughput of 300 tons per hour using a Baum wash box and then a proportion of washed smalls were mixed automatically with dry fines to produce blended smalls for distribution by road and rail.

Large cobbles 6” x 4” (0.15m x 0.10m) Group A house coal, Large nuts 4” x 2” (0.10m x 0.05m) Group B house coal, Nuts 2” x 1” (0.05m x 0.02m) Group D house, washed smalls for Carbonisation and Blended smalls, washed and untreated for CEGB at Willington and Ratcliffe power stations and Ketton Cement works.

The waste was transported up the tip by conveyor belt and distributed by bulldozer and scraper and the dirt tips were re-graded soiled and grassed and one part returned to a local farmer who was able to set and reap crops of spring barley using a combined harvester.

Roof bolting was carried out at 104s Loader gate using a Pegasus machine. After closure the shafts were filled with limestone chippings and capped with concrete by Nov 1989.

Geo
There are only four figures in the above photo, there is a patch of bare ground where a fifth previously stood, presumably moved for repair - From Geograph Website

Brierley Country Park was established later with walkways, grass, ponds, and trees, a haven for wildlife. These sculptures were created by Robert Koenig and are life-sized figures in oak, based on old photographs of Brierley miners, and are dressed in traditional clothes of miners from the 19th century. In 2001 mindless vandals sawed off three of the heads, and despite extensive searches, and a reward being offered, only two of the heads were recovered. They were returned to the sculpture who restored them, but they no longer reside in their original place, which was high on top of the spoil heap. Now they sit just outside the Visitor Centre for safe keeping.

A museum is situated close by at the entrance to the Park from Huthwaite Road. Information and any artefacts, photographs and documents are displayed of mining in the past eras.

I am deeply honoured that there were minor publications of mine on display for a while, about Sutton Colliery and also the mines of the upper Meden Valley.

Panel Nos in Piper seam: 10s and 10s re-head, 10s1, 11s, 12s, 14s, 15s, 16s, 17s, 1s NE and 60s. (I was part of the survey team on several of the panels, also on a major correlation at the Piper shaft).

Manpower: New Skegby Colliery Co - Brierley Hill:

  • 1893: 200 men and Boys
  • 1894: 154 Top Hard u / g, 45 s / f, 199 total

Sutton: 1895: 212 TH, 74 s / f, 286 total

  • 1896: 10 Top Hard, an electric coal cutter installed in Dips section, 56 s / f, 30 Dunsil re-opened, 1 s / f
  • 1897: Top Hard stood, 29 Dunsil, Tupton dev, 61 s / f
  • 1898: 114 Top Hard, 14 Dunsil, 144 Tupton start, 82 s / f

2Blackwell Colliery Co:

  • 1899: Top Hard stood, 99 Dunsil, 51 Tupton, 79 Deep Hard start, 102 s / f
  • 1900: Top Hard 99, Dunsil 79, Deep Hard 51, Tupton 252, s / f 102, 583
  • 1901: 81 TH, 59 D, 54 DH, 245 T, 127 s / f
  • 1902: 88 TH, 43 D, 80 DH, 286 T, 145 s / f
  • 1903: 69 TH, 59 D, 114 DH, 39 s / f, 357 T, 51 s / f, 689
  • 1904: 126 TH, 41 D, 106 DH, 78 s / f, 289 T, 42 s / f
  • 1905: 135 TH, 43 D, 122 DH, 87 s / f, 301 T, 63 s / f, 729
  • 1906: 117 TH, 64 D, 126 DH, 100 s / f, 311 T, 51 s / f
  • 1907: 129 TH, 45 D, 144 DH, 100 s / f, 327 T, 67 s / f
  • 1908: 107 TH, 14 s / f, 46 D, 2 s / f, 188 DH, 105 s / f, 360 T, 47 s / f
  • 1909: 123 TH, 27 s / f, 40 D, 13 s / f, 201 DH, 49 s / f, 368 T, 80 s / f
  • 1910: 118 TH, 25 s / f, 40 D, 12 s / f, 198 DH, 48 s / f, 380 T, 90 s / f
  • 31911: 114 TH, 41 D, 197 DH, 414 T, 177 s / f, 943
  • 1912: 87 TH, 34 D, 190 DH, 406 T, 191 s / f
  • 1913: 67 TH and D, 416 DH and T, 185 s / f, 668
  • 1914: 765 u / g, 202 s / f
  • 1915: 609 u / g, 191 s / f, 800
  • 1916: 692 TH, Dunsil Finish and abandoned, DH, T and Piper, 196 s / f
  • 1917: 677 TH, DH, T and P, 205 s / f
  • 1918: 741 TH, DH, T and P, 193 s / f
  • 1919: 888, TH, DH and T, 188 s / f
  • 1920: 865 TH, DH, T, 210 s / f, 1,075
  • 1921: 987 TH, DH and T, 193 s / f
  • 1922: 907 TH, DH, T, 183 s / f
  • 1923: 1,002 max, Top Hard, Deep Hard, Low Main (Tupton), Piper start, 191 s / f, (1,193 max total)
  • 41924: 980 TH, DH, LM and P, 191 s / f
  • 1925: 904 Top Hard Finish, (abandoned 31 / 7 / 1925, plan deposited 1927), DH, LM and P, 181 s / f1,085
  • 1926: 889 DH, LM and P, 163 s / f, 1,052
  • 1927: 917 DH, LM, P, 180 s / f, 1,097
  • 1928: 872 DH, LM, P, 180 s / f, 1,052
  • 1929: 900 DH, LM, P, 209 s / f, 1,109
  • 1930: 819 DH, LM, 193 s / f, 1,012
  • 1931: 524 DH, LM, 176 s / f
  • 1932: 544 DH, LM, 160 s / f
  • 1933: 626 DH, LM, 170 s / f, 795
  • 1934: 647 DH, LM, 164 s / f
  • 1935: 612 DH, LM, 171 s / f, 783
  • 1936: 611 DH, LM, 179 s / f
  • 1937: 572 DH, LM, 185 s / f
  • 1938: 601 DH, LM, 186 s / f:
  • 1939: 610 DH, LM, 190 s / f, 800
  • 1940: 659 DH, LM, 201 s / f, 860
  • 51941: 590 DH, LM, 201 s / f
  • 1942: 565 DH, LM and Piper Finish, 208 s / f
  • 1943: 537 DH, LM, 199 s / f

1944: NH and B Collieries: 582, DH, LM, 217 s / f

  • 1945: 614 DH, LM, 219 s / f, 833
  • 1946: coalface 341, EBG 302, surface 207, (850) (209,838 tons) Deep Hard and Low Main.

Tonnage and Manpower NCB: No4 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 232,282 tons, DH, LM, Piper reopened, 834 men
  • 1948: 249,684 tons, 675 DH, LM, P, 187 s / f, 862-766 men
  • 1949: 256,958 tons, 695 men
  • 1950: 262,882 tons, 500 DH Finish, P, LM, 179 s / f, 663 men average
  • 1951: 287,729 tons, LM, P, 653 men
  • 1952: 267,854 tons, LM, P, 619 men: 228,894 tons, LM, P, 155 s / f, 626 men
  • 1954: 241,633 tons, LM, P, 150 s / f, 615 men
  • 1955: 242,373 tons, LM, P, 140 s / f, 588 men
  • 1956: 263,377 tons, LM, P, 137 s / f, 600 men
  • 1957: 358,666 tons, LM, P, Threequarter heads, 138 s / f, 614 men
  • 1958: 286,836 tons, LM, Piper Finish, 143 s / f, 621men
  • 1959: 215,948 tons, LM, 137 s / f, 598 men
  • 1960: 231,649 tons, LM, 136 s / f, 580 men
  • 1961: 254,086 tons, LM, 136 s / f, 592 men
  • 1962: 292,474 tons, LM, 611 men
  • 1963: 323,207 tons, LM, 686 men
  • 1963 / 64: 299, 390 tons, LM, 694 men
  • 1964 / 65: 340,453 tons, LM, 721 men
  • 1965 / 66: 427,934 tons, LM, 773 men
  • 1966 / 67: 415,618 tons, LM, 790 men

North Nottinghamshire Area:

  • 1967 / 68: 458,359 tons, LM and Piper re-open, 160 s / f, 837 men
  • 1968 / 69: 548,404 tons, LM, P, 163 s / f, 942 men
  • 1969 / 70: 454,487 tons, LM, P, 185 s / f, 963 men
  • 1970 / 71: 457,955 tons, LM, P, 965 men
  • 1971 / 72: 243,879 tons, LM, P, 953 men
  • 1972 / 73: 393,328 tons, LM, Piper Finish, 189 s / f, 916 men
  • 1973 / 74: 294,783 tons, LM, P, 858 men
  • 1974 / 75: 420,170 tons, LM and Deep Hard reopen 820 men
  • 1975 / 76: 441,516 tons, DH, LM, 833 men
  • 1976 / 77: 362,384 tons, DH, LM, 169 s / f, 812 men
  • 1977 / 78: 294,568 tons, (299,296 tonnes), Deep Hard Finish, LM, 808 men
  • 1978 / 79: 368,491 tonnes, Piper reopen, Low Main, 795 men
  • 1979 / 80: 264,831 tonnes, P, LM, 780 men
  • 1980 / 81: 429,173 tonnes, P, Low Main Finish, 821 men
  • 1981 / 82: 437,500 tonnes, P, 793 men
  • 1982 / 83: 450,252 tonnes, Piper, 162 s / f, 767 men
  • 1983 / 84: 472,734 tonnes, P, Deep Hard reopened, 723 men
  • 1984 / 85: 419,320 tonnes, P, DH, 165 s / f, 688 men
  • 1985 / 86: 397,897 tonnes, P, DH, 690 men

British Coal:

  • 1986 / 87: 408,140 tonnes, P, DH, 669 men
  • 1987 / 88: 454,394 tonnes, 527 men
  • 1988 / 89: 528,012 tonnes, P, DH, 520 men
  • 1989 / 90: 164,726 tonnes Deep Hard. Colliery closed 11th August 1989.

 

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