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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry
And Nationalisation 1947

Bk
Chimney
1932
1934
1932 Pages   1     2     3  

1932 - Page 1


Means Test

The family ‘Means Test’ was introduced. For miners it was an existence not a way of life. Although many were poor there was little crime and probably those who committed the crimes were well known or suspected and some vigilante groups were known to have ‘sorted a few out’.


The Butties Ruled

Andrew Stones (later Undermanager at Sutton (Nottinghamshire) from 1942 - 1961) told me in 1962, that during the late 1930s he was earning up to £30 per week as a ‘Butty’ (i.e. in charge of a 5’ 0” (1.52m) thick Top Hard stall) at Teversal ! That was an absolute fortune, no wonder he could afford to buy houses. The men working for him would probably have received £5 to £6 per week, and that was above the norm.


The Trough of the Depression

The year 1932 was the trough of the depression. Men who had earned £5 a week previously, were now only able to earn £3 10s (£3.50) maximum due to short time caused by Quota restrictions. All the pits were in the 5 Counties Scheme previously, which ended in early 1930 and was replaced by a Marketing scheme. A Quota or maximum output per month was allotted to each pit or company, and if the output was exceeded, a levy of so much per ton had to be paid as a fine, so in the event of the limit being reached, the men would be laid off. Some pits had a system where the colliery steam hooter would be sounded say once for work and twice for no work that day. On many occasions the men would be allowed to proceed to their workplace underground before being told that there was no work, thereby depriving them of any ‘dole’ money that they may have been entitled to.


Tub System Discontinued

At Ollerton (Nottinghamshire) the old tub stall system of working was discontinued and the benk faces were swung into line to create one huge face line, worked as 3 conveyor panels. At the same time gate haulages were introduced and 38 of the 40 ponies used underground were brought to the surface, the last two, Trixie and Dixie, were used on 9s district using the old system and then on special jobs, for drawing off etc.


Parliament

Secretary for Mines was Ernest Brown MP 1932 - 1934.


Nystagmus

The Miners Nystagmus Committee of 1932 finally concluded that the disease of the flittering of the eyes in bright light was caused by working in poor illumination.


Village Demolished

The old mining village at Seymour near Staveley in Derbyshire was demolished on 15th April 1932. A closing Order had been granted in 1929. More flooding was experienced in the region as it had the previous year.


Explosion At A Lead Mine

At Youlgreave Lead mine in Derbyshire there was an explosion on 23rd May and 8 men perished. Cause not known.


Ilkeston Collieries

Ilkeston Collieries purchased Manners Colliery Co, which included Lodge colliery.


Alma Colliery (Derbyshire) Closed after 77 Years

Alma Nos 1,2,3 or North Wingfield (Derbyshire) at North Wingfield was closed finally in February 1932. Three 11ft (3.35m) dia shafts 510ft (155m) deep sunk by Thomas Holdsworth.

Seams worked: First Silkstone (Thomas Holdsworth) 2’ 4” (0.71m), also Ell seam? abandoned Nov 1883. Tupton 1’ 2½” coal, ½” bat, 3½” coal, 1½” bat, 4’ 0” coal (0.37m c, 0.12m b, 0.09mc, 0.25m b, 1.22m c), worked out 28th Mar 1907,
(Alma Colliery Co Ltd) 344 yards 2 ft deep (315m) Deep Hard seam 3’ 6½” (1.08m) thick, abandoned 28th Feb 1911, 280ft (85m) deep. Top Waterloo, (North Wingfield Collieries Ltd), 70 yards (64m) deep, 1’ 9½” coal, 9½” dirt, 1’ 4” coal (0.55m c, 0.24m d, and 0.40m c), start 1928, finished Apr 1931.

Owner:

  • Granville L Chambers.

Agent:

  • Mr Tom Lawton.

Manager:

  • Henry Hugh Carlton, Surveyor and Manager. (Alma Colliery Co Ltd) 1900s
  • PG Hickens 1910s.

Undermanager

  • George Cecil.

Surveyors:

  • WB Hague 1880s
  • Henry Hugh Carlton 1900s
  • Arthur D Marriott and Co 1920s - 1930s.

Fatal Accidents: Alma No1

  • T Reeds (17) run over by a train of tubs underground 14 Dec 1859
  • Samuel Jones (26) run over by tubs 17 Dec 1861
  • John Lomas (30) run over by tubs 16 Sep 1868
    • William Walker (26)
    • William Holdsworth (21)
    • 2 others killed by a boiler explosion on the surface 14 Jan 1869
  • Thomas McTye (17) fall of roof 18 Sep 1882
  • James McKegue (22) fall of roof 29 Oct 1883, died 28 Nov 1883
  • Thomas Oldham (35) crushed by a wagon on the surface 18 Feb 1884
  • Alfred Ford (35) fall of roof 27 Sep 1884
  • Thomas Reece (22) fall of roof 20 Nov 1884
  • William Speight (42) fall of roof 30 Mar 1886
  • John Dykes (47) fall of roof 25 Apr 1887
  • James Edwards (24) fall of coal 8 May 1889
  • Arthur Lilley (41) crushed by wagon on the surface 24 Jun 1889
  • Frank Handford (20) fell down the shaft 8 Jun 1894
  • Joseph Pegg (38) crushed by a wagon on the surface 12 Nov 1895
  • Ernest Hopkinson (18) fall of roof 24 Jan 1898
  • No2 pit: Thomas Burton (31) fall of roof 21 Aug 1900, died 22 Aug 1900
  • No4 pit: Joseph Tantum (18) fall of roof 26 Nov 1902
  • No2 pit William Goddard (16) run over by tubs 6 Mar 1903
  • Walter Reddish (27) run over by tubs 24 Jun 1904
  • No4 pit: Cyril Smallwood (25) fall of roof 19 Aug 1904
  • James Sheldon (45) fall of coal 2 Feb 1904, died 19 Dec 1905
  • No3 pit: John Beresford (52) fall of coal 2 Nov 1906
  • Alma No1: Isaac Taylor (17) crushed by a tub on the surface 8 Apr 1907, died 5 Jul 1907
  • No4 pit: Francis Hawkins (25) fall of roof 10 Oct 1906, died 19 Jul 1907.

Avenue Colliery Closed After 49 Years

Avenue No 9 (Derbyshire) sunk in 1883 by Clay Cross Coal and Iron Co.

Seams worked: Deep Soft, Deep Hard, Piper, Tupton, Threequarters, and Silkstone.

Manpower: Avenue No 9 from

  • 1894: 419 Tupton and Silkstone, 97 s/f
  • 1895: 425 Deep Hard, Tupton and Silkstone, 74 s/f
  • 1896: 408 Tupton and Silkstone, 78 s/f
  • 1897: 378 u/g, 97 s/f
  • 1898: 358 u/g, 106 s/f
  • 1899: 334 u/g, 96 s/f

Avenue No11 from

  • 1900: 367 u/g, 99 s/f
  • 1901: 365 u/g, 87 s/f

Avenue No 9 and 11 - Avenue No9:

  • 1902: 343 Deep Hard, Tupton and Silkstone, 94 s/f
  • 1903: 377 u/g, 94 s/f
  • 1904: 346 u/g, 92 s/f
  • 1905: 361 u/g, 93 s/f
  • 1906: 325 u/g, 85 s/f
  • 1907: 359 u/g, 108 s/f
  • 1908: 361 u/g, 94 s/f
  • 1909: 337 u/g, 95 s/f
  • 1910: 340 u/g, 94 s/f
  • 1911: 343 Piper, Tupton Threequarters, Tupton and Silkstone, 93 s/f
  • 1912: 385 u/g, 90 s/f
  • 1913: Deep Hard, Piper, Tupton, Silkstone and Deep Soft, 132 s/f
  • 1914: 379 Piper, Tupton, Silkstone and Deep Soft, 113 s/f
  • 1915: 299 u/g, 54 s/f
  • 1916: 300 u/g, 116 s/f
  • 1917: 325 Piper, Tupton and Silkstone, 115 s/f
  • 1918: 407 u/g, 112 s/f, Avenue 9 and Avenue 11 merged
  • 1919: 457 u/g, 112 s/f
  • 1920: 515 u/g, 111 s/f
  • 1921: 446 u/g, 90 s/f
  • 1922: 430 u/g, 90 s/f
  • 1923: 424 Tupton, Deep Soft, Threequarters and Piper, 89 s/f
  • 1924: 392 u/g, 91 s/f
  • 1925: 371 u/g, 87 s/f
  • 1926: 318 u/g, 80 s/f
  • 1927: 402 u/g, 90 s/f
  • 1928: 270 u/g, 79 s/f
  • 1929: 239 Tupton and Deep Soft, 78 s/f
  • 1930: 17 u/g, 17 s/f
  • 1931: idle
  • 1932: abandoned.
  • 1903: No9: 372 u/g, 94 s/f; 138 u/g, 24 s/f; No11: 141 u/g, 23 s/f
  • 1907: No9: 359 u/g, 108 s/f; No11: 146 u/g, 25 s/f
  • 1913: No9: 386 u/g, 132 s/f, No11: 187 u/g, 24 s/f
  • 1916: No9: 300 u/g, 116 s/f, No11: 156 u/g, 19 s/f
  • 1918 pits combined: 407 u/g, 112 s/f
  • 1920: 515 u/g, 111 s/f
  • 1923: 434 u/g, 89 s/f
  • 1924: 392u/g, 91 s/f
  • 1925: 371 u/g, 91 s/f
  • 1926: 318 u/g, 80 s/f
  • 1927: 402 u/g, 90 s/f
  • 1928: 270 u/g, 79 s/f
  • 1929: 239 u/g, 78 s/f
  • 1930: 17 u/g, 17 s/f
  • 1931: idle
  • 1932: nil u/g, 39 s/f, abandoned.

Agents:

  • Thos Dacre Croudace (639) pre 1883 - 1887
  • John Jackson 1887 -
  • George William Dickinson (113) 1920 - 1932.

Managers: Avenue No9:

  • JP Jackson Managing Partner pre 1883 - 1887
  • Thos Dacre Croudace (639) 1887
  • WBM Jackson (2374) 1888 -
  • John Ward (904) 1887 -

Avenue No9: from 1882:

  • Thos Dacre Croudace (639)
  • WBM Jackson (2374) - 1898
  • George Wharton (426) - 1906
  • George William Dickinson (113) 1906 - 1920 to Agent; for combined: John Robinson (3970) 1920 - 1921
  • Eric PW Muschamp (980) 1921 - 22
  • PL Collinson (1331) 1923 - 1929
  • George William Dickinson (113) 1929 - 1932.

Undermanagers: No9 only from 1886:

  • Alfred Heslington (731 service cert) - 1896
  • A Hunter (939) 1896 -
  • No11: J Davison (3255 / 2nd) - 1903 to Morton
  • No11: JT Butler (4106 / 2nd) 1903 - 1906 to Clay Cross No2
  • William Butler (5378 / 2nd) 1906 - 1911 to No9:
  • No11: JW Walters (4116 / 2nd) 1911 - 1919
  • R Bridgewater (4396 / 2nd) 1912 - 1929
  • TA Sharpe (2617 / 2nd) 1929 - 1932.

Fatal Accidents:

  • William Lloyd (16) caught in machinery on the surface 19 May 1884
  • Charles Kilpin (22) fall of roof 23 Apr 1888
  • Thomas Beardsley (45) fall of roof 17 Jan 1890
  • George Lenthall (39) fall of roof 20 Aug 1894
  • Charles Yates (15) crushed by tubs 13 Nov 1896
  • William Brooks (35) caught in a coal cutter 28 Oct 1901, died 7 Nov 1901
  • George Lowe (37) fall of roof 6 Mar 1907
  • George H Berresford (35) fall in a roadway 1 Oct 1909
  • James Sharpe (73) injured his hand 19 Apr 1912, died from toxaemia 7 Jun 1912
  • Walter Goodwin (63) fall of roof 12 Nov 1925

Avenue No11 was abandoned, but used as a pumping pit, later to supply the Carbonisation plant with water. This pit had been sunk 1860 - 1861 by the Wingerworth Coal Co as Avenue and taken over by Clay Cross Co in 1897 as No11 (stood from 1894 - 95). Shaft positions SK36NE E439559 N367760, E439260 N367960. Depth 712ft (217m).

Avenue Manpower (Wingerworth Coal Co):

  • 1894: 23 Deep Soft, 5 s/f
  • 1896: 19 DS, 4 s/f
  • 1897: Deep Soft stood, none u/g, 1 s/f
  • 1898: 1 s/f.

Seams worked: Deep Soft.
Managers:

  • John Ward (904) and Agent pre 1883 - 1887
  • Henry Gregory (799) - 1895
  • Arthur Brealey (816) 1895 - 1898.

Colliery stood. Purchased by Clay Cross Coal and Iron Co: Renamed Avenue No11:
George Davison (3255) 1900 - 1932?

Fatal Accidents Avenue 11:

  • William Ramsdale (25) fall of coal 21 Sep 1908
  • Walter Wilkinson (52) fall of coal 11 Mar 1913
  • Tom Swift (44) fall of roof 9 May 1916
  • Francis Richard May (61) run over by tubs 9 Mar 1917, died 10 Mar 1917
  • Ernest Bird (54) fall of roof 15 Sep 1917.

Pithead Baths Were Opened
  • Manton, Worksop (Nottinghamshire), Wigan Coal Co)
  • Shirebrook (Derbyshire) (Shirebrook Colliery Co)
  • Wingfield Manor (Derbyshire) (Wingfield Manor Colliery Co) during 1932.

Barnsley Bed Coal For Record Speeds

Facts About The Flying Scotsman


Flying Scotsman

 


Silver Jubilee sets record railway speed 1935

 


Mallard 4468 and her record breaking run July 3rd 1938

The excellent Barnsley Bed (Top Hard) brights coal from Harworth (Nottinghamshire) was used in the record breaking run of the ‘Flying Scotsman’ from London to Edinburgh in 1932, breaking 100mph and later also used when the record was broken again by the 'Silver Jubilee' railway engine in November 1935 when 112 mph was achieved. However the ultimate speed of a steam locomotive would be broken with 126mph by 'Mallard' in July 1938.


Collieries Opened in 1932

  • Barlborough Common Abdy or Sough or Winter Bed
  • Birchwood Vale (Birchvale Colliery Co) a further adit driven in Dec 1932
  • Ford Lane (Kay and Kay), third mine following closure of one in 1930, 2 adits, again hit old works and ancient level
  • Oakwood Grange (originally Grange), Cossall was opened on the site of opencast workings abandoned in 1930. There were 2 short narrow gang tramways on the colliery surface. Smalley colliery drift (Henry Woolley and Co) to Deep soft
  • Starvehim Valley (E Glossop)
  • Styrrup Farm (Styrrup Coal Co) Chisworth, and Wingerworth Park (E Smith) Wingerworth, opened Dec.

Ramcroft Pumped Dry

Ramcroft (Derbyshire) (Hardwick Colliery Co) was pumped dry having been flooded and re - opened after 16 years.

 

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