Banner
Information and photographs submitted by subscribers are posted in good faith. If any copyright of anyone else's material is unintentionally breached, please email me

Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry
And Nationalisation 1947

Bk
Chimney
1914

Book 3
Part 2 - The Fall of the Industry from 1914


Peak Output Reached

Peak output was reached in 1913 however the impending War would affect what was a growing trend and the industry would now start to decline.


Haulage Roads

Further Coal Mines Regulations were introduced. New rules included that from 1st January 1914 no unauthorised person was to travel a haulage road, whilst the haulage was in motion. 


Minimum Age Underground

The minimum age of boys allowed to work underground was raised to 14.  Miners were now granted the right to have their wages paid weekly. 


Training at the Face

It was also made illegal for any inexperienced man to work at the coalface unless supervised by a collier who had at least 2 years experience. 


Uniform System of Signalling

Provisions relating to use of electricity underground was brought in and A uniform system of signalling was brought in for the first time.

Shaft signals

  • 3 to signify men riding by the Banksman, answered by 3 from the Onsetter in the pit bottom, both signals sent to the engine driver.
  • The Onsetter rang 3 again then rang 1 and this is followed with 2 to lower after a second or two by the Banksman, then the engine driver lowers the cage. Once in motion a single 1 ring tells the engine driver to stop, generally used only in an emergency.
  • 4 bell rings told him to raise the chair steadily
  • 5 told him to lower steadily.
For coal turning the signals are simply
  • 1 to raise, 2 to lower etc. 
  • Haulage engines underground had similar signals with a pre-arranged station signal, should the station be part way along a roadway, and not at the termini.

Butterley Company

There were now only 14 collieries operated by the Butterley Co by 1914: Bailey Brook, Birchwood, Britain, Denby Hall, Kirkby; Loscoe, Lower Hartshay, New Langley, Ormonde, Portland No2; Ripley, Upper Hartshay, Waingroves and Whiteley.  Henry Eustace Mitton (photo) had recommended the closure of the inefficient mines and reorganised the mines under his control, with increased output. Generally all the bricks required at the pits were made from clay from their own brick fields.  The first screening plant was installed at Kirkby No2 shaft.

The Deep Soft seam workings were stopped at Britain colliery (Butterley Co) on Lady Day 1914.


Moor Green

Moor Green (Barber Walker & Co) (Nottinghamshire) was developing Deep Soft and Deep Hard seams, but the Undermanager John Varley was unable to cope and another Undermanager, John Lee was appointed to the Deep Soft working.


Parliament

President of Board of Trade, John Burns (Lib), 11th Feb 1914 - Aug 1914.  Succeeded by Walter Runciman (Lib Coalition) 5th Aug 1914 - 1916.


Union

Frank Hall took over as General Secretary of the Derbyshire Miners Association following the death of W.E. Harvey. 
Frank Lee was elected Assistant Secretary and Compensation Agent.


Strike

A strike started on 14th April 1914 at the Pinxton tar distilleries. The cokemen had joined the union in July 1913 on the assumption that they would get better pay and conditions, but this had not materialised.


Colliery Villages

As at many of the colliery villages, football teams were organised and in the 1913-1914 season, Bestwood Colliery Football Club were champions of the Bulwell and District League.


Wages

By 1914

  • Piece-rate coal getting was 9s 10d (49p)
  • Coal getting on daywage 7s 0d (35p)
  • Haulage 6s 8d (33⅓p)
  • Timbering and ripping 7s 0d (35p)
  • Deputies 8s 0d (40p)
  • Labourers 5s 8½d (28½p) a shift.

Renishaw Park Flooded and Abandoned

At Renishaw Park (Derbyshire) (J & G Wells Ltd),
water broke into the workings and flooded a large area of Flockton or Deep Soft seam, and the pit was abandoned in 1914No1, 672 ft (205m) & No2, 618 ft (188m) stood, No3, 192 ft (58.5m) to Deep Soft 62/77, No5, 798 ft (243m) Parkgate 183 men u/g and 47 on s/f. The pit would later be pumped dry and re-opened, however until that time the men were thrown out of work unless they were able to obtain work at any of the neighbouring mines.

Agent:

  • W Edwin Wells.

Managers at Renishaw

  • Fred Hardwick (2277)
  • George W Dickinson (255) for all, then Nos 1 & 3
  • T Seaman (1641) Nos1 & 3
  • H Burgin (398) Nos2 & 5, later Agent
  • Henry Curry (3092)
  • WH Burgin (3475) Nos1 & 2 and Hornthorpe also, promoted from Undermanager
  • Albert Riley (2320) Nos 3 & 5
  • HM Holliday (2310) Nos3 & 5.  

Undermanagers

  • John Bradley (296-2nd)
  • W Fisher (2nd) No1
  • John Briggs (2nd) No2, George Baker (2nd)
  • George Sargeson (service cert) No3 then No1
  • G Schofield (2nd) No5
  • A Hopkinson (2nd) No2
  • J Ward (2nd) No3
  • A Preston (2nd) No5
  • R Brewster (2nd) No1
  • J Varley (2nd) No5
  • T Davis (2nd) Nos 1& 2
  • J Beaumont (2nd) No5
  • T Seaman.
Manpower:
1894:
No1
: 353 Silkstone, 58 s/f;
No2
: 289 Silkstone, 113 s/f;
No3
: 98 Deep Hard, 11 s/f;
No5
: nil S, u/g, 6 s/f;
1895:
No1
: 330 S, 92 s/f;
No2: 276 S, 106 s/f;
No3: 89 DH, 13 s/f,
No5
: nil, 6 s/f;
1896:
No1
: 329 S, 80 s/f;
No2
: 301 S, 116 s/f;
No3: 111 DH, 21 s/f;
No5
: nil, 6 s/f;
1897:
No1
: 340 S, 79 s/f;
No2
: 274 S, 100 s/f;
No3
: 119 DH, 24 s/f;
No5
: nil, 6 s/f;
1898:
No1: 312 S, 97 s/f;
No2: 257 S, 90 s/f;
No3
: 119 DH, 23 s/f;
No5: stood;
1899:
No1
: 308 S, 72 s/f;
No2
: 263 S, 88 s/f;
No3
: 126 DS, 28 s/f;
No5: stood;
1900:
No1
: 321 S, 125 s/f;
No2: 274 S, 59 s/f;
No3
: 118 DS, 26 s/f;
No5: stood;
1901:
No1
: 284 S, 89 s/f;
No2: 341 S, 57 s/f;
No3
: 116 DS, 55 s/f;
No5
: 44 DH, 14 s/f;
1902:
No1
: 301 S, 90 s/f;
No2
: 276 S, 54 s/f;
No3: 120 DS, 45 s/f;
No5
: 39 DH, 15 s/f;
1903:
No1: 342 S, 81 s/f;
No2: 317 Silkstone & DH, 55 s/f;
No3
: 107 DS, 44 s/f;
No5: 58 DH, 7 S, 18 s/f;
1904:
No1: 373 S, 80 s/f;
No2
: 282 S & DH, 42 s/f;
No3
: 134 DS, 48 s/f;
No5: 4 DS, 1 s/f, 34 DH, 12 s/f, 16 S, 2 s/f;
1905:
No1
: 355 S, 81 s/f;
No2
: 341 S & DH, 43 s/f;
No3
: 63 DS, S, DH, 11 s/f;
No5: ?;
1906:
No1
: 320 S, 78 s/f;
No2
: 282 S, 48 s/f;
No3
: 126 DS, 38 s/f;
No5
: 40 S, DS, 11 s/f;
1907:
No1
: 377 S, 77 s/f;
No2: 266 S, 44 s/f;
No3
: 122 DS, 28 s/f;
No5
: 43 S, DS, 12 s/f;
1908:
No1
: 311 S, 64 s/f;
No2
: 320 S, 44 s/f;
No3
: 76 DS, 26 s/f;
No5
: 28, S, DS;
1909:
No1: 93 S, 24 s/f;
No2
: 302 S, 44 s/f;
No3
: 81 DS, 24 s/f;
No5: 98 DS, S,16 s/f;
1911:
No1
: 183 S, 18 s/f;
No2
: 204 S, 31 s/f;
No3
: 79 DS, 96 s/f;
No5
: 179 DS, DH  29 s/f;
1912:
No1
: stood;
No2
: stood;
No3
: 97 DS, 93 s/f;
No5: 158 DS, DH, 28 s/f;
1913:
No3
: 101 DS, 89 s/f, standing;
No5
: 189 DS, 39 s/f;

1914:
No3
: 62 DS, 77 s/f;
No5
: 182 Parkgate, 47 s/f;

Pit closed, flooded.
* DS - Deep Soft
* DH - Deep Hard


Norwood

J & G Wells purchased Norwood from the Sheepbridge Coal & Iron Co.


Mapperley

Old workings were met at Mapperley in the Deep Soft seam curtailing further development in that area. It was apparent that ancient workings were not known about in quite a few instances as mentioned previously.


Boring For Harworth

Boring began for the new proposed Harworth colliery (North Nottinghamshire).


Rawdon

In 1914 it was decided to remodel Marquis and Rawdon collieries (South Derbyshire). A new screening plant was built at Rawdon capable of 100 tons per hour.


New Company Formed

During October 1914, a new company with Sir Arthur Markham as Chairman was formed, to work the Top Hard seam at Heath and Palterton SK 446002, 369175, shaft dia 14 feet (4.27m), the Top Hard lay at 183 yards (168m) deep.


Watnall

At Watnall (Nottinghamshire) (Barber Walker & Co) the High Hazel and Main Bright seams were being developed and a new pit bottom was made 100 yards (91m) up the shaft from the Top Hard pit bottom.  A new Undermanager William Wright from Lancashire was appointed and John Millership, the old Undermanager, who always wore a bowler hat in the pit, was put in charge of the Coombe seam.


Wages

At Selston coal getters wages were 9s 8¼d (48½p) a shift.


Electricians

At this time in Nottinghamshire, it appears that only one colliery Clifton (Clifton Colliery Co) had a regular staff of electricians.
There seemed to be a reluctance to install electricity at most pits as the machinery was driven by steam or compressed air.


Clay Cross

The winding of coal was abandoned at Clay Cross No4 (Clay Cross Co Ltd) and concentrated at the No2 colliery (Derbyshire) where the Threequarters seam was opened.

 

Go 1 Page 2