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Calendar
The Continued Rise Of The Industry
To 1913

Bk2
Chimney
1912

1912


Articled Apprentice

On 31st January 1912, Henry Eustace Mitton of the Butterley Co took Thomas Henry Adams as an articled apprentice, to learn the job as a Colliery Viewer, at the sum of £100 per year. A detailed document laying down all kinds of rules etc was duly signed by both and witnessed by another.


Strike at Bentinck

There was a strike at Bentinck (Nottinghamshire) (New Hucknall Colliery Co) in February 1912, again over minimum rates. The union allowed the winders, firemen, datallers and ostlers to carry on working to keep the roads open, but no coal was to be produced.


National Strike April 1912

There was a National strike by all miners for 6 weeks. Notices expired at the end of February to 10th April 1912. In December 1911 the

  • Derbyshire miners had voted 17,999 for a strike and 6,816 against.
  • Nottinghamshire miners voted 17,086 in favour with 5,386 against.
  • Nationally the vote was 445,801 for with 115,921 against.
The strike had been caused by the inability to establish a minimum wage at national or local level. During the stoppage the miners used to chant . . .

'8 hours work, 8 hours play,
8 hours sleep and
8 bob (40p) a day'

However the settlement fell well short of the miners’ demands but the strike had brought in minimum rates for all workers.


Minimum Wages Act

On 29th March 1912 the Coal Mines (Minimum Wage) Act was passed which guaranteed 6s 6d a day (32½p), however this did not apply to anyone above 65 years of age. It came into force from 25th June 1912. However the minimum rate paid in Nottinghamshire was 7s 3d (36¼p).

Surface workers and bank workers were paid at the following rates: Aged 13, 1s 2d (5⅓p) a shift

at 14, 1s 6d (7½p)
at 15, 1s 10d (9p)
at 16, 2s 2d (10¾p)
at 17, 2s 6d (12½p)
at 18, 2s 11d (14½p)
at 19, 3s 3d (16¼p)
at 20, 3s 7d (18p)
at 21, 3s 11d (19½p)

Subject to % addition of 20%. Men aged 22 and over were paid the 1888 basis, i. e. 3s 4d (16½p) plus 50%.

Winders pay was 7s 9d (38¾p) a day
Fan men 5s 4d (26½p) for 8 hours
Air compressor drivers 5s 2d (25¾p)
Loco drivers 5s 6d (27½p)
Shunters 5s 2d (25¾p)
Head Stoker 5s 7d (28p)
other Stokers 5s 2d (25¾p).

In April 1912 a vote throughout the country showed

  • North Derbyshire 8,080 voted to return to work with 13,428 voting against.
  • Nottinghamshire 8,187 voted to return with 8,213 against.
  • South Derbyshire 1,626 voted to return with 1,090 against.
  • Great Britain as a whole, 201,013 voted for resumption and 244,011 against.

Following the strike some Derbyshire pits were ‘solid’ and could not be worked for many weeks. Some owners refused to employ older men, saying they could not afford to pay the minimum wage rates. The price of coal was raised, up to £2 a ton in London.


Explosion at Holbrook

On 27th April 1912 there was an explosion at Holbrook (J and G Wells) and 2 men were killed.


Clipstone

Work started on preparing to sink Clipstone in 1912 when more than 5,000 acres of land was leased from the Duke of Portland by the Bolsover Company.


Changed Hands

Worthington Colliery and Pipe Co Ltd sold Worthington (Staunton), (South Derbyshire) to Hardy and Co, tile and pipe merchants.


Sutton

At Sutton (Nottinghamshire) (Blackwell Colliery Co Ltd) in June 1912 there were 87 men in Top Hard, 34 in Dunsil, 190 in Deep Hard and 407 in Low Main or Tupton, with 191 surface men, whereas by 1913 there were only 67 in the Deep Hard and Dunsil and 416 in the Tupton. Blackwell Colliery Co was working Low Main under a sub-lease from Pinxton Collieries Ltd.

Above in the photo are the management personnel for the Blackwell Colliery Co who performed safety duties during the 1912 strike.


HM Inspectorate

On 9th July 1912 Inspectors William Henry Pickering (53), Henry Richardson Hewitt (45) and Gilbert Young Tickle (34) were tragically killed at Cadeby Main, (Yorkshire) (Manager Charles Berry) in one of the two explosions occurring at 1. 30am and 11am. Total fatalities were 88 men and boys including 2 Managers, an Undermanager, the Surveyor and a student plus several other under-officials. (Throughout the country there were 20 explosions in the 3,265 mines, causing 124 fatalities).

On 28th July 1912 Thomas H Mottram was appointed Chief Inspector for the District.


Candles Held Too Far Away From Coal Face

PJ Fenwick Manager of Pleasley stated that the candles that were used at the coal face for illumination were being held too far away from the work, and causing nystagmus, and on medical advice should be shaded with air reflectors painted white on the inside.


Watnall

By the end of 1912, Watnall (Nottinghamshire) (Barber, Walker and Co), the only Top Hard pit in the Eastwood area was only producing around 300 tons a day and the Coombe coal which lies just above it was opened out to replace it.


Wages

There was a further advance of 5% in wage rates in December 1912.


Collieries Opened in 1912

  • Ambergate (E Glossop) Bull Bridge, re-opening.
  • Gun Lane (J and E Shore) Nether Heage, Norton.
  • Hartington (Staveley Coal and Iron Co) Blackshale re-opening.
  • Low Moor (Kirkby) (Butterley Co Ltd) sinking.
  • North Wingfield (North Wingfield Colliery Co) Deep Soft.
  • Ollersett Hall (Ollersett Collieries Ltd) re-opening, Mountain.
  • Rufford (Bolsover Colliery Co) sinking.
  • Snibston Stephenson shaft sinking.
  • Unstone Silkstone (Hawkins and Jackson) new opening.
  • Welbeck (Nottinghamshire) (New Hucknall Colliery Co) sinking.
  • Walton (Walton Colliery Co) Chesterfield, Piper.

The Following Pits Were Stood or Abandoned in 1912

  • Alma No2 and No4 (Alma Colliery Co Ltd) N Wingfield.
  • Blackwell B No3 (Blackwell Colliery Co) Waterloo stood.
  • Broadfields (Broadfields Colliery Co) Horsley Woodhouse, 8 Mickley, 9 s/f, Surveyor RB Ireland.
  • Chew Wood (Glossop Vale Ganister Co Ltd), ganister 13” (0. 33m) + 3” (0. 08m) stone), Cross and Sons, Ashworth and Morris.
  • Denby Hall Rough Close (Butterley Co Ltd) Deep Hard, Low Main.
  • Digby (Digby Colliery Co Ltd) Deep Soft 2’ 9” (0. 84m) + 10” (0. 25m) bats, 11/1912, Surveyor John Rigby.
  • Grasscroft (Grasscroft Colliery Ltd), Dronfield, Blackshale, worked 1907 app – 1912.
  • Ilkeston (Ilkeston Colliery Co Ltd) 400 Kilburn, 106 s/f, Manager: B Nightingale (1267), Undermanager: John J Blood (4345 / 2nd) closed after 36 years.
  • Kilburn Hall (Parkin, Bell and Co) Ashgate 2’ 11” (0. 28m), poor quality, near surface.
  • Mapperley 1 (Mapperley Colliery Co) Piper stood 1909.
  • Oakwell (Ilkeston Colliery Co) Kilburn, DC 232 yards (212m), UC 228 yards 2 feet (209m), Dec 1912, Manager FJ Durance, Surveyor MR Coxon (qual).
  • Pinxton No6 (Pinxton Collieries Ltd) Deep Soft 113 yards (103m) 43/nil, Surveyor EA Hughes (830).
  • Plumptre (Butterley Co) Deep Hard and Main Soft abandoned 30 Apr 1912, Surveyor John Holbrook (service cert), Agent H Eustace Mitton (no cert).
  • Rectory (William Ogle and Joseph Cockayne) Kilburn, coal batts 11” (0. 28m), coal 2’ 6” (0. 76m), batts 6” (0. 15m) and coal 10” (0. 25m) no use, left, met old works, exhausted, 8/6/12, Albert A Peake (1st Class and Surveyor’s cert endorsed), confirmed by William Ogle, 4 shafts, 15 yards (44. 5m), 13 yards (12m) and 2 at 19 yards (17. 25m)
    Holly Bush pit 35 yards (32m).
  • Renishaw Park 1 and 2 (J and G Wells), Eckington stood.
  • Ripley (Butterley Co Ltd) Ell and Blackrake ironstone, Soft coal and Hard coal unprofitable, John Holbrook Surveyor, H Eustace Mitton Agent, No1 shaft 163 yards (149m) to Deep Soft, 192 yards (175. 5m), pit top 474 feet (144. 5m) above sea level, No3 shaft 209 yards (191m) to Piper, 256½ yards (234. 5m) to Low Main, 295⅔ yards (270. 3m) to Blackshale.
  • Ryefield (Bourne and Sons) Denby, Deep Soft.
  • Shady Hall (William Horrox) Marsh Lane, Silkstone 11/3.
  • Mosbro Hall or Streetfield (J Worrall), Eckington, Deep Hard or Parkgate, 15 Oct 1912, DC shaft 20 yards (18. 25m) and UC 17 yards (15m), app 228½ yards (250m) between them, Surveyor J Fletcher Archer MA, MIME (853).
  • Top Drift (Derby Kilburn Colliery Co Ltd) Stanley.
  • Whiteley (Butterley Co), Silkstone stood 1911.
  • Wingfield Manor (Wingfield Manor Colliery Co Ltd) Silkstone stood since 1908.
    (19 Pits)

Collieries Opened And Then Closed in 1912

  • Robin Hood (His Grace Duke of Devonshire), Baslow, 5/1, Baslow coal, Apr.
  • Birchen Lea (T Kyme and Son), Dronfield Woodhouse.
  • Rectory (William Ogle and Jos Cockayne) Heage, Kilburn: coal batts 11” (0. 28m), coal 2’ 6” (0. 76m), batts 6” (0. 15m), coal no use 10” (0. 25m), old workings met.
    (3 Pits)

Plumptre Colliery Closed 1912 After 62 Years

(Also known as New England)

The photos show a group of 35 men at the colliery. They are looking fairly happy whilst posing and probably as the mine had just closed they had a job to go to at another mine nearby.

Plumptre (Butterley Iron and Coal Co)  Eastwood (Nottinghamshire) sunk in 1850 to 220 yards (201m) and 223 yards (204m) deep to Deep Hard seam, was abandoned in 1912. It was 206 yards (188.3m) to the 3' 6" (1.07m) Main Soft (or Deep Soft seam). The Deep Hard seam section was shown as Jay 10" (0.25m), Scud 6" (0.15m), Deep Hard coal 2' 6" (0.76m), Total 4' 0" (1.22m) extraction.

The pit was sometimes referred to as Plumptree, Plumtree and also known as New England. These were misnomers as it was named after the Rev’d Plumptre an incumbent at Eastwood. It was situated not far from Eastwood Hall, Shaft positions E446183, N347976, E4461132 N348037.

There were 3 sets of stables in the pit bottom. Coal was ganged in tubs to the pit bottom by ponies led by young boys.
The benk faces were about 80 yards (73m) long accessed by one gate.
A pillar was left for the Great Northern station at Eastwood.
Originally the ventilation was effected by an underground furnace in the pit bottom near to and connected to the UC shaft before a fan was installed. 
A Water level roadway is shown passing through the pit bottom. The surveys were done by dial using the magnetic meridian and was adjusted periodically.
Adjacent workings from Barber Walker and Co were surveyed by John R Hewett and John Holbrook in 1876. Probably Holbrook had not joined the Butterley Co as their Chief Surveyor at that time.

The shaft section was documented by John Gregory of Ilkeston 5 Mar 1857

  Yards Feet Inches
Onset 3 2 0
Soil and clay 1 1 0
Blue Bind with ironstone balls 3 0 6
Smut   2 2
Clunch   1 10
Stone   1 4
Clunch   1 4
Blue bind   1 5
Clunch   1 4
Coal and shale mixed     4
Stone bind 1 0 9
Stone   1 0
Stone bind 1 2 0
Rock 3 1 0
Cank 1 1 6
Rock   1 9
Stone bind 1 0 0
Blue bind 2 2 0
Soft or Com coal   2 10
Clunch 2 0 0
Blue bind with ironstone balls 4 2 6
Main Hard Coal (Top Hard) 1 1 0
Clunch 1 0 8
Stone 1 0 2
Stone bind   1 3
Blue bind   2 8
Ironstone measure     2
Black bind     7
Blue Bind     3
Black shale     3
Duncil coal (Dunsil)   1 10
White clunch 2 0 0
Dark clunch 2 0 0
Stone bind 1 0 0
Dark bind and ironstone balls 1 2 6
Shale and Kernel coal (Cannel?)   2 0
Ironstone measure     4
Black shale     9
Clunch   2 0
Blue bind   2 0
Soft coal   2 0
Clunch with water 1 0 0
Stone bind 1 1 5
Cank very hard 1 0 0
Stone bind   1 4
Bind with ironstone ball     4
Ironstone     2
Blue bind   1 4
Bind shed     8
Bind with ironstone ball 2 0 3
Coal     9
Stone   1 1
Clunch 2 0 0
Stone 4 0 0
Bind with ironstone 1 1 0
Waterloo coal   2 0
Clunch     8
Coal     4
Clunch 2 0 11
Blue bind 3 0 9
Ironstone measure     3
Soft coal   1 4
Clunch 1 1 0
Stone bind 3 0 0
Blue bind 4 2 0
Coal   1 10
Clunch 1 0 0
Stone bind 2 1 5
Blue bind 1 0 0
Ironstone     3
Stone bind with Goskin 4 1 5
Blue bind 3 1 11
Black bat with shale   1 3
Coal   1 8
Clunch 1 0 0
Stone 6 0 0
Blue bind 4 1 9
Coal Rough Rake   2 2
Clunch 1 0 0
Clunch 1 0 0
Strong stone bind 6 0 0
Dark bind 8 2 0
Shale   2 4
Blue Bind Tanyard shale 1 1 3
Shale   2 6
Stone bind   2 0
Black shed     5
Stone bind 3 1 8
Stone mixed with cank 4 0 8
Blue bind with small Whetstone 3 0 0
Dark bind 13 1 5
Ironstone measure     3
Dark bind   1 9
Cockle measure     3
Black shale 1 0 7
Bottom measure Brown Rake     3
Blue bind 1 1 5
Coal     10
Clunch 1 2 0
Rock 1 2 6
Stone clunch   1 2
Rock 3 0 7
Stone bind 1 0 5
Dark bind   1 8
Cank     9
Top stone     3½ 
Black shale Black Rake 2 2 1
Bottom stone     3
Stone bind 4 0 9
Coal and bats   2 6
Clunch   1 2
Coal   1 0
Stoney clunch 1 2 8
Stone bind 2 1 8
Blue bind 3 0 0
Coal   1 8
Clunch 2 0 7
Stone 10 1 5
Stone bind 1 0 0
Black shale   10  
Main Soft Coal (Deep Soft) 1 0 6
Dark clunch 1 1 0
Stone clunch 1 2 0
Bind 2 2 6
Black shed     8
Bind 2 2 3
Gassakin     8
Blue bind 3 2 10
Gea coal   1 0
Scud     7
Lower Hard Coal   2 6
Brown bats     6
Black clunch   1 6
White clunch 1 1 0
Blue bind   1 4
Stone   2 3
Blue bind and ironstone balls 7 2 8
Black shale     3
Piper Coal   2 1

Total depth 231 yards 1  foot  11 inches  This was agreed by John Holbrook and H Eustace Mitton on 6 June 1912 and it was stated that the copy was to be kept by the Butterley Co Ltd. However there does appear to be a discrepancy in this section as on the abandonment plan it states that the shaft depths to the Deep Hard seam are 220 yards and 223 yards respectively. Possibly when the section was measured in 1857 I note that many of the strata measurements are round numbers and continually adding these together would lead to a longer length. There does not appear to be an end column giving running depths, which is the way to avoid any discrepancies and is the usual practice.

Seams worked: Deep Soft and Deep Hard.

From the Abandonment plan signed by John Holbrook Surveyor to the Butterley Co Ltd and countersigned by Henry Eustace Mitton as Mining Agent the following quantities of coal was recorded.

Quantity of coal worked from commencement to Michaelmas 1868 was 17 acres 1 rod and 8 poles or perches which at £75 per acre raised £1,297 10s 0d in lease payment for the owner His Grace the Duke of Newcastle. Surveys at the time were carried out by George H Bond & Son Mining Engineers of Nottingham. The pit was leased by the Butterley Co Ltd, colliery offices at Codner Park, nr Alfreton, Derbyshire.

Total amount worked to Michaelmas 1877 was 43 acres 2 rods 3 poles realising £3,263 18s 1d.
From Michaelmas 1877 to Lady Day 1882 total was 54 acres 1 rod 23 poles realising a total of £4,079 10s 6½d in lease payments.

The bottom photo shows the men with their tools, shovels, drills etc which they had to purchase so they were taking them home with them.. To the left written on 2 shovels is 6s and to the right 2 shovels with 10s. These were the last two districts worked. 

Manpower:

  • 1894: 370 men in Deep Soft, Deep Hard, 65 on s/f
  • 1895: 375 DS, DH, 65 s/f
  • 1896: 381 DS, DH, 66 s/f
  • 1897: 368 DS, DH, 65 s/f
  • 1898: 360 DS, DH, 65 s/f
  • 1899: 349 DS, DH, 62 s/f
  • 1900: 321 DS, DH, 62 s/f
  • 1901: 344 DS, DH, 63 s/f
  • 1902: 369 DS, DH, 61 s/f
  • 1903: 349 DS, DH, 61 s/f
  • 1904: 373 DS, DH, 64 s/f
  • 1905: 331 DS, DH, 58 s/f
  • 1906: 296 DS, DH, 51 s/f
  • 1907: 294 DS, DH, 51 s/f
  • 1908: 339 DS, DH, 55 s/f
  • 1909: 362 DS, DH, 58 s/f
  • 1910: 300 app, 50 s/f
  • 1911: 265 DS, DH, 44 s/f
  • 1912: 256 DS, DH, 45 s/f.

Both seams were abandoned and the mine was closed as deemed unprofitable on 30 April /1912 after 62 years.

Agents:

  • Francis Channer Corfield - 1905
  • Henry Eustace Mitton 1905-1912.

Managers:

  • Wm Sutton (1445) 1850-1891
  • Humphrey R Watson (2333) 1891-1912.

Undermanagers:

  • Jas Walker (service cert  973) pre 1887-1912.

Surveyor:

  • John Holbrook (a Surveyor’s certificate was granted by the Divisional Inspector of Mines because under the Coal Mines Act 1911 a Surveyor must possess the qualifications prescribed in the Secretary of State’s Order of 27 February 1912. However certificates were granted to competent Surveyors who had been in post for a considerable time prior to this date and they were not required to pass an examination.)

Fatal Accidents Plumptre:

  • Gervase Granger (28) fell down the shaft 13/2/1853
  • William Naylor (36) explosion of firedamp 28/12/1854, died 7/1/1855
  • Robert Cresswell (40) fall of roof 21/2/1856
  • Robert Paxton (25) fall of roof 18/7/1857
  • Thomas Fletcher (30) fall of roof 29/9/1863
  • Explosion of firedamp John Smith (34), Robert Bircumshaw (63) and James Granger (66) all 3 killed 8/6/1867
  • Wainwright, a boy (13) run over by tubs 24/11/1867
  • John Slater (13) run over by tubs 11/8/1870
  • John Bennett (66) fell down the shaft 6/11/1871
  • John Walker (30) fall of roof 19/4/1873
  • Walter Mayer (26) fall of roof 3/9/1879
  • John Barnes (40) and Geo Lacey (24) fall of roof 10/5/1881
  • John Hudson  (47) fall of roof 5/10/1881
  • Alexander Fletcher (19) crushed by tubs 11/5/1885
  • George Herrick (35) fall of roof 12/3/1888
  • Jacob Clifford (19) fell from the cage down the shaft 3/4/1889
  • John Calladine (34) fall of roof 19/10/1889
  • Samuel Hallam (44) fall of roof 10/12/1894, died 13/12/1894
  • Samuel Smith (?) crushed by wagons on the surface 7/11/1895
  • Amos Canlin (41) fall of roof 22/12/1900
  • William James Kennerall (30) fall of coal 5/1/1903
  • Samuel Slater (49) fall of roof 11/5/1908

There were many small mines started about 1910/12 but were closed by 1914.

If you look closely No 6 is chalked on a couple of shovels to the left and 10s on the ones to the right.
These were panel or district numbers and probably were the last faces worked.
Click above photo to enlarge Death Entry

Miners At Plumptre Colliery
(Also known as New England)
Photos supplied by Kathleen Edwards

The group above, Matthew Wilson (bottom right).  His brother, Ernest is above him
centre top is his brother in law Ted Hickling - below him is his brother.



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