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Genealogy - Family History

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Fatalities in Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Yorkshire Collieries - Alan Beales

Alan Beales

Alan Beales was a miner at Gedling Pit for 30 years.
He has been researching mining fatalities in the Midlands and Yorkshire for a number of years.

If you have any queries regarding fatalities in Nottinghamshire Collieries, Alan Beales has published a book 'Fatal Accidents in the Coal Mines of Nottinghamshire'. It is available for reference in  six venues 1 copy in each in. It contains 3,070 names  of men and boys plus one woman who died in Nottinghamshire pits, with 65 pits named:-

  • Angel Row Library Nottingham.  
  • Nottinghamshire Archives Castle Meadow Road  Nottingham   
  • Hucknall Library  
  • Sutton Library  
  • Mansfield Library
  • Worksop Library.

He also has two booklets, 'Fatalities at Gedling Colliery 1905 -1985' and 'Transcriptions of Inquest reports transcribed from local Newspapers'. These are available in:-

  • Nottingham County Library
  • Carlton Library
  • Gedling Library
  • Arnold Library.

Alan has also compiled a list of Derbyshire fatalities and has almost 4,000 names on his data base.

He is also finishing a history of Gedling Colliery which may or not be published but he will put a copy in some libraries in any case. Alan worked at Gedling for 35 years.

If any one needs information contact Alan by emailing me.

Cheers Alan Beales

Alan has now compiled a list of 3280 Nott’s pit deaths and over 4100 Derbyshire deaths


Calendar
Robert Bradley - Retired Surveyor

- My History Of Mining -

Bob

Mine Related Deaths - Memorial Roll

Where Did They Work?
There are two parts to this question:


Names

In Which Collieries Could They Have Worked?

(Information from Durham Mining Museum Site)

Please note that there is no database of mining employment available! Given the number of people employed in the industry over the centuries this would be a very large database — and the records do not exist. Where records survive they show the list of employees by Colliery, if your relative moved between collieries (quite likely!) then you will have to consult a number of lists and with the lack of records remaining this could well be a fruitless task.

How can I find out where my ancestors worked? There are two parts to this question:—

1. In which collieries could they have worked?

If you have an address or village name from your research then it is possible to find the local collieries using our web site. For each colliery we show all the other collieries and pits for which we have information within a 5 mile (8 km) radius of each other. If the only information you have is for the latter part of the twentieth century then this information will not be enough as people travelled further to work as the availability of public and private transport increased. For the nineteenth century and before the information we provide will be sufficient as it is likely that your ancestors walked to work each day — from the house provided by the colliery companies as part of the miners pay. Be aware though that when the Miners' Bond was active it was possible for a miner to work in a different mine (locally) each year!

2. Are there any employment records for colliery X?

What records survive from the colliery companies (including the NCB) will have been deposited with a local archives service. Tyne and Wear Archives have a web page that shows what records they hold for individual collieries. The index of holdings for Durham Record Office can be searched using their web site. Both of these web sites show what documents have been deposited with them — you will have to visit the archives to view the documents themselves.

If you have an address or village name from your research then it is possible to find the local collieries using the Durham Mining Museum web site. For each colliery they show all the other collieries and pits for which they have information within a 5 mile (8 km) radius of each other. If the only information you have is for the latter part of the twentieth century then this information will not be enough as people travelled further to work as the availability of public and private transport increased. For the nineteenth century and before the information they provide will be sufficient as it is likely that your ancestors walked to work each day - from the house provided by the colliery companies as part of the miners pay. Be aware though that when the Miners' Bond was active it was possible for a miner to work in a different mine (locally) each year!

Mine Related Deaths

First of all check our Durham Mining Museum Memorial Roll to see if they have an entry for the person you are trying to find. The list of fatalities is by no means complete, but as they continue their own research the number of names grows - They also welcome contributions from all sources. The sources they use are as follows:

  • Annual Mines Inspectors Reports. These Government reports provide an annual overview of mining accidents in the region and provide information on the cause of the accident and the names of any fatalities. They also provide some information on non fatal accidents, gallantry awards etc. The North East of England was included in the reports from 1859.
  • Newspapers.
  • Parish Records - burial registers.
  • Tombstones/Monumental Inscriptions.
  • Occupations
  • Colliery Workers/Employees/Work Record

Ian WinstanleyA very important source is the Coal Mining History Resource Centre run by Ian Winstanley.
Ian has been extracting the names of fatalities from the Mines Inspectors Reports and other sources for quite some time and has a database of over 90,000 names covering the whole country. Check his Web Site, on Ancestry for further details.


Learn The Basics Of Starting Your Own Research On The BBC Family History Site

If you are trying to trace your ancestors then there are many groups that may be able to help you, ranging from local history groups to the larger family history societies. Some of the local history groups that maintain their own web pages have contacted the Durham Mining Museum and they have provided a link to their web site via their.


Isabella’s Recommendation - History at Home: A Guide to Genealogy - by Andrea Davis

Geneaology

Hi Fionn,
I'm writing to you on behalf of my children's group. My name is Cathryn, and I've been referencing your genealogy page for the kids' genealogy projects that they'll be working on for Family History Month. So I just wanted to say thanks for all the help from all of us. :-)

One of the girls in my group, Isabella, also found a great article on family history and genealogy:
History at Home: A Guide to Genealogy - by Andrea Davis. She wants to go to college to be a history teacher, so I thought this would give her more encouragement, plus help others interested in genealogy!

If you have any other information or resources you think the kids would get a kick out of, please pass it on. Thanks again!

Best

Ms. Cathryn Weaver


How To Gather Family Information

HomeAdvice

With our lives in today’s world getting busier, our knowledge of our ancestors is rapidly decreasing. There definitely are some seniors in our families who know much more about our family tree, but this information, if not transferred, is bound to be lost with them. Some of it might already be lost. If you are looking to assimilate information about your family, the following sources and methods could prove to be of great help.

Click here for lots of help and information


I wanted to share with you my latest publication as I think you will probably find it very interesting too:-

Guide

A Guide To Free Genealogy & Family History Books

Steve Anastasiadis

Story

This is Steve from HomeAdviceGuide. Martha, a history teacher from Kentucky, shared with me a few days ago the following great publication: "How To Teach Kids About Family History and Genealogy". It looks very interesting, because with this kind of advice parents can help their children connect with previous generations. It also touches on autistic children.

Table of Contents

 •  Introduction
 •  The Importance of Family History
 •  Activities to Share with Children
 •  Storytelling
 •  Talking to Family Members
 •  Prepare Special Meals
 •  Take a Family History Field Trip
 •  Make a Collage or Scrapbook of Family Photos and Mementos
 •  Hold/Attend Family Reunions
 •  How to Create a Family Tree
 •  Teaching Autistic Children
 •  Resources for Children

Cheers

Steve

Ancestry

Ancestry

Ian
Coal Mining History Resource Centre


Nottinghamshire family History society have more records for births, marriages and deaths than the internet sites, all on CDs

So if anyone is stuck and have Nottinghamshire roots tell them to try them.

Mick Siddons did a fantastic job for Nottinghamshire FHS right up to when he died he transcribed many thousands of records for them.

Terry Smith


There is also a large amount of information for those interested in genealogy in the UK and Ireland provided on the internet via the GENUKI site. Both the GENUKI web site and the local Family History Societies can be of assistance in finding your ancestors using Parish Records and Monumental Descriptions.


FreeBMD is an ongoing project, the aim of which is to transcribe the Civil Registration index of births, marriages and deaths for England and Wales, and to provide free Internet access to the transcribed records.

Rootsweb.com


The Official Government Source of
Genealogical Data For Scotland

You need to buy credits but they are reasonably priced.

Warwickshire Online Local History


If you are looking for death certificates for relatives who died in a pit disaster, then the registry office is a good place to start.
John Miles


If you know the rough time period in which your ancestor died and if this is after 1837, you can search the GRO index of deaths and order a copy of the death certificate using the reference number in the index from the GRO. The GRO indexes of Births, Deaths and Marriages are available at most main libraries in the UK and at the Family History Centres provided by the Church of Latter Day Saints throughout the world.


Coroner's Inquests

Having obtained a death certificate you may see that a Coroner's Inquest was held. Unfortunately very few records of these inquests have been deposited with local record offices, generally speaking the records were destroyed. However, there may have been coverage of the inquest in the local newspapers, the coverage varies from a single line or paragraph to many column inches for disasters.


Are there any employment records for your colliery?

What records survive from the colliery companies (including the NCB) will have been deposited with a local archives service. Tyne and Wear Archives have a web page that shows what records they hold for individual collieries. The index of holdings for Durham Record Office can be searched using their web site. Both of these web sites show what documents have been deposited with them - you will have to visit the archives to view the documents themselves.


Forest of Dean

The Forest of Dean Local history Society mining fatality CD can be obtained from The Publications Officer, Forest of Dean Local History Society, The Cottage, Ross Road, English Bicknor, Glos. GL16 7PA


From: Barbara Grayson - 6 January 2008

I recently found details of a mining accident at Annesley Colliery on June 1877 - I would recommend this site for anyone searching for family history links. I have another paragraph from page 90 and a 'map' - all the details were obtained from 'Derek' compiler of the Black Sheep Index for a modest fee, simply using name and date - if anyone should get in touch will willingly pass on or share info. but prefer not to add my email address.

http://www.blacksheepindex.co.uk

Barbara



Thanks to Alan Vickers For The Above Image



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