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Mines REscueCreswell Disaster - In Rememberance - Page 2
Fri 29 Sept 1950 -Those Who Died
Thanks to Ian Gilbert and The Derbyshire Times, Fri 29 Sept 1950

Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
John William Brocklehurst (44), 101, Duke St., Creswell, had worked at Creswell Colliery for 30 years. When he was 15 he broke a leg as the result of a tub running over him. He was born at Shirland He was a member of Creswell Comrades' Club. He leaves a widow one son and a daughter.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
William Henry Bird (39), packer, 32 Model Village, Clowne was single and lived with his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bird. Born at Creswell, Mr. Bird worked at Creswell Colliery until he joined the Royal Horse Artillery at the beginning of the World War. He returned to the colliery last November after working for four months at Worksop. He was, for some years, with the Yeomanry in the T.A. A keen sportsman Mr Bird captained the Creswell colliery Institute darts team. He was also well known in the local bowls circles.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
John Henry Boden (29), cutter, 4 Thorp Ave. Bakestone Moor, was born at Worksop and came to Creswell Colliery as a trainee about three years ago. Before the war he was employed as a bargeman on Worksop Canal and later served for four years in the Royal Navy. His war?time duties were in a destroyer on convoy work between Britain and North Russia. He met his wife, a Lancashire girl, while working as a stoker at Tyldesley Colliery, near Manchester. He leaves two children aged four and two. His mother Mrs. F. Lowe, lives at Kilton Rd Worksop,
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Ernest Briggs (34), 68, Duke Street Creswell, returned to work at the colliery in 1947, after serving in the R.A.F, for some time. He had worked at the pit since leaving school. He was married and has a son and daughter. He, had a sever accident to his back in 1935. He was an active member of Creswell Bullivant Club.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Herbert Stanley Buckle (48), gummer, 3 Rockside Cottages, Clowne, who had lived In Clowne since he was 11, was married with two daughters. He had worked at the colliery for 19 years. During the war he was a Special Constable, and for some years he has been a member of Clowne Liberal Club. His elder daughter's fiancé is Thomas Holmes, whose father was also killed in the disaster.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
The three Dodd Brothers, Leslie (47), John (46) and Ernest (37) all lived at Creswell but were members of a Whaley family. Originally they used to walk to work at Creswell each day from Whaley. Leslie lived at 46, Morven St., and was married with one daughter. He had always worked at Creswell Colliery. John, who was married with two daughters, and lived at 50, Welbeck Street, Creswell, had worked at the pit for 30 years with the exception of seven years' war service, six of which were spent in India. Ernest was married with three children and lived at 20 Bevin Hostel. He spent 12 years in the Army, leaving to enter the pit. A fourth brother, Arthur Dodd lived in Skinner Street, Creswell, also works it the Pit
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
John William Doxey (46), chargeman packer. 47, Model Village, Creswell, was a native of Eckington but had been at Creswell about 11 years. He was married and had five children.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Fred Doncaster (28), 65, Duchess Street, Creswell, was born at Creswell. And began work at the colliery when he was 14. He has two brothers serving in the Army. His father works on the surface at Creswell Pit. Fred was employed as an erector. His mother died 10 weeks ago, owing to the shock from a recent Creswell accident.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
George Ellis (51). 10. Welbeck Street, Creswell, leaves a widow, two sons and two daughters. He was a native of Whitwell and had worked at Creswell since he was 18 years old. He formerly lived at the "Mallet and Chisel," Whitwell, where his father was licensee for many years. One of the volunteer workers who helped to carry out the first three bodies recovered was his son? in ? law, Mr. Lawrence Cocking, 134, Welbeck Street, who went to the pit to work on the day shift. He told our representative of the impossible task, which faced the rescue workers. They worked with fire extinguishers but the flames were burning timber supports.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Charles Foulke (49), 34. Duke Street, Creswell, had lived in the village all his life and had worked at the pit since leaving school. He leaves a widow, two sons and one daughter. He had had three accidents at work the worst being a compound fracture of the leg.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
C. Hemingray (25). Duches Street, Creswell was born at Creswell and had worked at Creswell as an erector. He began work at the colliery at the age of 14. He was a charge hand. He was married three weeks ago
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Mr. Thomas Hart (39), 61 Duches Street, Creswell, was born at Creswell and had worked at the colliery since a boy. He was roadman. Mr Hart was not married. He was keenly interested in football.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Reginald Fred Holmes (44) cutter, 29 Church Street, Clown who had worked at Creswell Colliery all his life leaves a widow and two sons. His youngest, Lawrence, is in the Army. A native of Clown Mr. Holmes was a member of many organisations in the district, including the Miners' Welfare and Clown Liberal Club.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Jack Humphreys (37), 62, Welbeck Street, Creswell, was born in Wales. He came to Creswell and worked at the colliery as a packer on the night shift. He was a bachelor.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Leslie Hancock (28), 45 Carpenter Avenue, Norbriggs., Mastin Moor, had been employed at the Colliery for nearly three years and was formerly a boiler fireman with British Railways. He is the youngest son of Mrs H Hancock of the same address. His brother, who lives at 27, Circular Road, Staveley, and who is a haulage hand at Ireland Colliery, passed a two?day vigil at the Colliery. As well as to the family, the news came as a great shock to Miss Rose Hudson, Duke's Drive, Newbold, his young lady, who hurried back from a holiday, at Hythe, Kent, immediately. She is on the staff of Whittington Hall.
Courtesy of the Derbyshire Times
Cecil Hendley (34) cutter, 90 Neale Street. Clowne, was married with seven children, whose ages range from the oldest, Patrick (11) to the youngest who is two years old. Mr. Handley had been married 12 years and had lived in Clowne since he was 14. He first worked at Oxcroft Colliery and then went to Creswell Colliery.

 

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