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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947

Book 6
Chimneys
1988
1990

1988 Pages   1     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12  

1988 - Page 7


Mansfield Closed After 83 Years

- Continued -

Mines Inspector

Shane Philips Collection

Mines Inspector for the District on 23rd March 1989.

In May 1937 as advertised in the Mansfield and North Nottinghamshire Advertiser (1d) (1p) the price of one ton of Mansfield coal delivered by G Forrest, Coal merchant was:

  • Bright cobbles 23/- (£1.15)
  • Bright house coal 19/- (95p)
  • Brights 22/- (£1.10)
  • Hazel bright house coal 17/- (85p)
  • Kitchen coal 14/- (70p)
  • Hazel second cubes 10- (50p)
  • Washed pea nuts 14/- (70p).

New office block built in 1951/52.

A new canteen was opened in 1953.

New mine fans were installed in 1955/56 to cater for the extending network of roadways.

New pithead baths were built and opened in 1958/59 and other surface buildings in 1958.

In 1955 a trial heading in the Brinsley seam was done, but not exploited. In 1969 a 250 ton surge bunker run of mine to coal prep, and the plant could deal with 470 tonnes of run of mine material. The dirt was crushed to a 400 ton bunker up rated later to 750 tonnes and 15 cu yd dumpers took the dirt to the tipping area and grading was done by bulldozer.

Ventilation was effected by a 151” (3.83m) single inlet backward aerofoil bladed centrifugal Aerex fan with a 750hp synchronous induction motor giving 333,000 cu ft per min at 9.2” (0.23m) water gauge in 1957. The standby fan was a Waddle 18 ft (5.49m) dia.

Materials in the High Hazles was by diesel locos and endless rope.

Mansfield was the first to install Diesel Locos underground pre nationalisation in 1945.

The Deep Soft seam was accessed by cross-measures drift from Top Hard seam and materials supplied by endless rope system. 3 heatings were experienced in this seam.

Coal was transported up the 1in4 cable belt. 4 bunkers were integrated in the system to allow coal to be off-loaded during peak production and returned to the system at times of low production.

Men were transported by rope haulage and conveyor belts.

Materials for the High Hazles seam were transported by diesel loco, and endless rope haulage as per Deep Soft.

On Tuesday 10/10/1949 there was a broken drum on No2 shaft winder. 200 men were sent home and the Hazles seam was stood for a week whilst a new shaft was fitted.

On 7/5/1964 there was an unofficial strike over wages. It would appear that the miners at Mansfield were being paid less than the average wage for the County. The walkout over the demands for parity was soon settled and the 1,600 men returned to work.

A surface bunker was operational in 1978.


Photo from Our Mansfield and Area

Subsidence costs were extremely high, up to £7m. At one time the large Co-op Dairy on Southwell Road, Mansfield was undermined and had to be demolished in 1982 due to its dangerous condition.

Output for the final year 1987/88 was 775,000 tonnes produced by 1,000 men.

1988 the colliery lost £14 million, but 1983/84: saw the heaviest loss at £39.972m, a phenomenal amount however for week-ending 2nd April 1987 a European record was achieved from 4s face at 4ft 3in (1.3m) high of 20,465 tonnes, the cutting machine travelling 12.9 miles in the week, a far cry from November 1986 when only 9,000 tonnes was produced from 6 faces in 5 seams. Colliery output was 25,712 tons. However Mansfield was classified as the largest pit in the country in 1911 when 4,950 tons was produced in 24 hours.

No2 electric winder DC system was replaced in 1985 with a new NEI Rationalised Thyristor DC ‘D’ size drive system and static compensator and using the existing winder mechanicals and the existing drum shaft coupling (existing auto-control skip plant with automatic winding).

No1 winder DC winder drive system changed to new NEI rationalised Thyristor DC ‘C’ size drive system in 1986 and using the existing winder PD mechanicals and the existing drum shaft coupling. (existing decking plant and manual winding). Automatic winding for men had been pioneered here, just prior to closure.

At one time the large horses used for underground transport were well known, and obviously from their size denoted that the underground roadways were fairly high. Ponies were employed also and in 1910 there were around 120 animals underground, however by 1936 that number had dropped considerably as new methods of coal production were employed and some mechanical haulages were installed. By the 1960s the ponies were redundant.

Roof bolting was introduced in 202s development using a Pegasus and Boart BM8 machine.

The plans for all 5 seams were completed and stippled by me as stated earlier as I had been appointed Surveyor for the Mine as from 25th April 1988 Aug 1989 (to close the mine down) and John Grayson (4070) Surveyor, having left the Board’s service by then, but being at the pit for many years as Assistant then Unit Surveyor, completed the Surveyor’s report for each seam by May 1989.

John Payne (9235) the Manager in charge of closed collieries at the time (with his office being at Mansfield Colliery) signed the plans to state that no further working had been carried out since the seam had finished working and the workings had been plotted to that date.

Malcolm Bottomley (5747), Inspector of Mines came to the colliery to inspect the seam plans and tip plans and discuss with me the relevant points prior to deposition of same by me at the Mining Records office. All usable equipment was offered and transferred to the relevant collieries within the Area, all survey notebooks parcelled up and taken to Mining Records office and all other books and plans etc examined by me to save for further use or for destruction. Care had to be taken as to what was to be saved or destroyed because once destroyed there is no coming back.

Both shafts were filled and capped by Aug 1989.

The two railway bridges on Violet Hill were dismantled to give better access. The distance to London by rail was 144 miles.

The original McLane tip nicknamed Rice Hill remained the only one of this type in the region and was shrouded with trees to the Forest Town side. Proposals to remove the tip for re-washing were met with strong public opposition, however as with all oppositions, priorities will out, and tip washing was commenced and the tip was flattened out 2003.

The site of the closed colliery was developed into an Enterprise Zone with the building of new factories bringing many jobs to the area. Two half winding wheels with plaques denoting Crown Farm Industrial estate are situated at the old pit lane entrance from Violet Hill.

A borehole was drilled by Alcane Energy into the old High Hazles loco road workings 2003/04 with the sole purpose of extracting methane gas, converting it to electricity and apart from connecting to the national grid, sold electricity to the neighbouring Toray factory. A further hole was scheduled for 2008 and the existing 3 pumps/turbines were to be doubled to 6.

I was given a tour of the arrangements in 2008 by Colin Rose, Mechanical Engineer for Alcane and one time Mechanical Engineer at Mansfield. The gas purity was about 70% methane to air.

Shane Philips Collection

Manpower: Bolsover Co: 1902: sinking 11 prep, 123 s/f, total 134 men

  • 1903: 127 sinking, 161 s/f, total 288 men
  • 1904: 140 sinking, 120 s/f, 260 total
  • 1905: 127 Top Hard 161 s/f, 288 total
  • 1906: 707 u/g, 296 s/f, 1,003 total
  • 1907: 1,260 u/g, 345 s/f, 1,605 total
  • 1908: 724,834 tons, Top Hard,1,389 u/g 456 s/f, 1,845 total
  • 1909: 1,011,697 tons Top Hard, 1,950 u/g, 467 s/f, 2,417 total
  • 1910: 2,000 app u/g, 475 s/f, 2,475 total
  • 1911: 2,050 u/g, 491 s/f, 2,583 men
  • 1912: 1,950 u/g, 499 s/f, 2,449 total
  • 1913: 2,050 u/g, 533 s/f, 2,583 men
  • 1914: 2,101, 516 s/f, 2,617 total
  • 1915: 1,952 u/g, 500 s/f, 2,452 total
  • 1916: 1,856 u/g, 494 s/f, 2,350 total
  • 1917: 2,100 u/g, 516 s/f, 2,616 total
  • 1918: 2,041 u/g, 527 s/f, 2,568 total
  • 1919: 2,252 u/g, 635 s/f, 2,887 total max
  • 1920: 2,217 u/g, 644 s/f, 2,861 men
  • 1921: 2,162 u/g, 628 s/f, 2,790 total
  • 1922: 2,147 u/g, 591 s/f, 2738 total
  • 1923: 2,134 u/g, 578 s/f, 2,712 men
  • 1924: 2,116 u/g, 601 s/f, 2,717 total
  • 1925: 2,073 u/g, 591 s/f, 2,664 total
  • 1926: 1,921 u/g, 532 s/f, 2,453 total
  • 1927: 1,959 u/g, 437 s/f, 2,396 total
  • 1928: 1,510 u/g, 408 s/f, 1,918 total
  • 1929: 1,551 u/g, 366 s/f, 1,917 total
  • 1930: 1,530 u/g, 367 s/f, 1,897 men
  • 1931: 1,125 Top Hard and High Hazel, 262 s/f, 1,387 total
  • 1932: 1,153 u/g, 271 s/f, 1,424 total
  • 1933: Top Hard and High Hazel 985, s/f 261, total 1,246 men and boys
  • 1934: 1,127 u/g, 307 s/f, 1,434 total
  • 1935: 995 u/g, 323 s/f, 1,318 total
  • 1936: 1,017 u/g, 347 s/f, 1,364 total
  • 1937: 1,125 u/g, 368 s/f, 1,493 total
  • 1938: 1,125 u/g, 367 s/f, 1,492 total
  • 1939: 1,115 app u/g 375 s/f app, 1,490 app
  • 1940: 1,100 u/g, 381 s/f, 1,481 total
  • 1941: 932 u/g, 338 s/f, 1,276 total
  • 1942: 1,120 TH and HH, 390 s/f, 1,510 total
  • 1943: 1,133 u/g, 392 s/f, 1,524 total
  • 1944: 1,254 u/g, 386 s/f, 1,640 total
  • 1945: 1,20 TH and HH, 365 s/f, 1,585 total
  • 1946: 463, 811 tons, 1,539 total.

Tonnage and Manpower NCB: 1947 No3 Area EMD: 526,264 tons, Top Hard and High Hazel 1,518 men

  • 1948: 690,042 tons, TH, HH, 1,685 men
  • 1949: 675,344 tons, 1,656 men
  • 1950: 678,340 tons, 1,629 men
  • 1951: 638,150 tons, 1,653 men
  • 1952: 508,517 tons, Top Hard abandoned, HH, 1,522 men
  • 1953: 573,230 tons, 1,522 men
  • 1954: 625,616 tons, 1,526 men
  • 1955: 692,457 tons, 1,605 men
  • 1956: 703,034 tons, 1,654 men
  • 1957: 780,230 tons, HH, Deep Soft start 1,770 men
  • 1958: 772,514 tons, 1,825 men
  • 1959: 844,683 tons, 1,857 men
  • 1960: 788,027 tons, 1,819 men
  • 1961: 784,023 tons, 1,798 men
  • 1962: 811,709 tons, 1,795 men
  • 1963: 859,674 tons, 1,796 men
  • 1963/64: 859,437 tons, 1,784 men
  • 1964/65: 806,471 tons, 1,723 men
  • 1965/66: 799,515 tons, 1,616 men
  • 1966/67: 882,518 tons, 1,530 men

North Nottinghamshire Area:

  • 1967/68: 956,123 tons (max), 1,571 men
  • 1968/69: 917,704 tons, 1,616 men
  • 1969/70: 812,251 tons, 1,592 men
  • 1970/71: 879,097 tons, 1,570 men (profit £759,000)
  • 1971/72: 733,052 tons, 1,579 men (profit £106,000)
  • 1972/73: 805,640 tons, 1,554 men (profit £124,000)
  • 1973/74: 683,000 tons, 1,495 men (loss £503,000)
  • 1974/75: 790,799 tons, 1,474 men (profit £1.321m)
  • 1975/76: 721,826 tons, 1,470 men (profit £1.009m)
  • 1976/77: 855,780 tons, 1,462 men (profit £4.707m)
  • 1977/78: 832,453 tonnes, (819,303 tons), 1,472 men (profit £4.069m)
  • 1978/79: 895,412 tons, 1,497 men (profit £3.871m)
  • 1979/80: 879,068 tons, 1,505 men (profit £5.103m)
  • 1980/81: 859,013 tons, 1,516 men (profit £4.018m)
  • 1981/82: 830,943 tons, 1,482 men (loss £333,000)
  • 1982/83: 929,531 tons, 1,449 men (loss £735,000)
  • 1983/84: 817,937 tons, 1,404 men (loss £39.972m, a phenomenal amount)
  • 1984/85: 591,057 tons, 1,346 men (loss £14.181m)
  • 1985/86: 670,145 tons, 1,380 men (loss app £10.0m)

British Coal:

  • 1986/87: 641,859 tons, Main Bright start, Low Main, High Hazel and Deep Soft abandoned, 1,275 men (loss)
  • 1987/88: 609,626 tons, Low Main, Main Bright, Deep Hard/Piper start, 983 men (loss).

Production ceased 25th March 1988. Low Main, Main Bright and Deep Hard/Piper abandoned. Tremendously high subsidence costs. Colliery closed 31st March 1988.

Agents:

  • John P Houghton Agent 1903-1913
  • John Bingley (1106) Agent 1913-1918
  • Sam Evans (1430) Agent 1919-1930
  • Thomas Eric Boswell Young, Agent 1930-36
  • Wilfred H Sansom (858) Agent 1937-1944
  • John T Rice (816) 1945-1948
  • Elijah Shaw (1156) 1948-1950, died in post
  • George G Heathcote (2438) Agent 1950-1952
  • Jim Reid (2103) 1952-.

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers / Production Managers:

  • Alfred E Naylor (1928) Group Manager
  • Jim S Thompson (3006) Group Manager 1958- (to NE)
  • Jack E Wood (4395) Group Manager No1
  • Jack Hanman (3115) Group Manager No4 1964-1965
  • David R Mounsey (4840) Group Manager 1966-1972, (promoted to Deputy Chief Mining Engineer)
  • J Brian Perry (3119) Group Manager, Production Managers after this.