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Calendar

The Decline Of The Industry Continued
After Nationalisation 1947


Chimneys
1964
1966
1968

  1966    1    2    3    4    5    6 

1966 - Page 5


Cossall Colliery (Nottinghamshire) Closed After 93 Years

Cossall colliery (Nottinghamshire) sunk in 1878-1879 by Lynch and Cadogan or Cossall Colliery Co to the eastern edge of Ilkeston at Cossall and known as Hewletts pit after Alfred Hewlett Chairman of the Company,was closed in November 1966 after 93 years.

Shaft positions: SK44SE, No1 UC shaft 10' 0" (3.05m) dia, 447813, 342676, 255 yards (233m) deep, No2 shaft 15' 0" (4.57m) dia, 447761, 342653 271 yards (248m) deep to 12 yards (11m) below Kilburn seam. Both shafts lined with 9” (0.23m) brickwork.

The shafts were sunk between the Nottingham Canal and the Erewash Valley railway to the Kilburn seam. Coal production from Kilburn continued until 1928.

The shaft tops was at 170’ 6” (52m) above sea level.

A briquette plant was built 1874 and last worked in Oct 1959 after 85 years. The plant was demolished in 1961.

Cossall surface drift was driven using 9' x 8' (2.74m x 2.44m) arches for 250 yards (229m) at 1in9 app in 1935-1936 to the Low Main, locally known as Cossall Footrill position 43/4742/879545, approx 150m to South East of shafts, when all the coal was transported out of the mine by this means using 29 cu ft tubs on 2' 0" (0.61m) gauge track from Sep 1936 and the shafts used for ventilation. Later in 1952 36" (0.81m) trunk conveyors were installed.

Old Turkey Field shaft was re-opened in 1952/1953 and the ventilation fan started Dec 1953.

Pithead baths were built at Oakwood for Cossall men in 1949.

Submersible pumps were installed at Cossall in Nov 1951.

A new explosives store was built Aug 1951. Landsale bunkers, weigh bridge, gantries etc also built in 1951.

A new power house was built in 1952.

At the Coal Prep Plant 6 dry cleaners were installed with a throughput of 250 tons per hour, working by June 1954.

Nissen hut type Pithead baths were opened at Cossall on 28/1/1950 and also for Oakwood men. New Pithead baths were built and opened in Jan1961.

The stockyard was re-organised in 1959 and extended in 1965.

Alterations were made to the surface sidings in 1962/1963.

A new canteen and pay office was built and opened in July 1963.

Blending scheme June 1964.

A TV Console centre operational by Sep 1964.

The stables were extended in 1964 also.

A deployment centre opened July 1965.

A connection was made to Oakwood Grange (drift position 43/4842/829537) in Dec 1953 and in 1958 the collieries were merged into one unit until coal working finished in October 1966.

At the Washery plant 2 Greaves boxes were transferred from Wollaton and installed and working by Jan 1966.

The last ponies were released from drudgery after salvage operations were completed at Cossall.

Eric Healey, now Chairman of the NUM Retired Miners Association with an office in Mansfield, adjacent to St Peter's Retail Park, (2015) worked at Cossall driving a pony called 'Captain' from 1964-1965. He reckoned about 20 ponies were in use around that time.

Water was pumped to the surface to protect other collieries lowside.

Seams worked were

  • Kilburn 46” (1.17m) 1879-1928
  • Tupton (Low Main) 43” (1.1m) 1918- Nov 1966 via 1in5 drifts from Kilburn, and had extended as far as the River Erewash in the West and Digby old workings to the North. The seam to the East had thinned to 30” and to the South washouts and poor mining conditions and uneconomical. All pumping in the seam was stopped on 10/11/1967 and the mine became waterlogged
  • Deep Soft 36” (0.91m), North East area drifts from Piper May 1958, ceased working Jan 1965, South East area drifts from Deep Hard and Piper Jan 1960, ceased working Nov 1966, exhaustion. The Deep Soft was exhausted due to being bounded to South East by Strelley, Kimberley, Broxtowe and Wollaton colliery workings, to the North East by a 80 yards (73m) and to the South East by Kimberley and Broxtowe workings and also to the North and East and to the South by Wollaton and by Old Strelley to the West
  • Deep Hard 41” to 49” (1.04 to 1.2m) 3 areas via drifts from Piper.
    North East from Nov 1964 – Nov 1966
    East of mine mouth June 1950-Apr 1957 and area to South East July 1943 – Mar 1966; 1950-1953, 1954-1957
  • Piper 42” (1.06m) via a drift from Low Main July 1943-, at a point close to Oakwood Grange (1937-1967) drift mouth.
  • Waterloo at 40” (1.0m) was proved but not worked.
  • 1st Waterloo, main drift from Piper in Dec 1958, ceased working Mar 1960 because of danger of water in ancient Top Hard workings within 100 ft above
  • In 1958 the pits were merged into one unit until production ceased in Oct 1966
  • Piper July 1943-Oct 1966 when there was a thinning of the seam down to 24” (0.61m) to the East
  • Piper worked from Oakwood Grange 1937 and a connection was made Dec 1953,
  • Oakwood continued producing to Feb 1957
  • A small area of Low Main worked at Oakwood Grange Sep 1954-July 1958
  • At Deep Hard seam horizon there were connections to Old Strelley Deep Soft in order to drain the water.

There were 2 shafts 271 yards (248m) and (233m) 62 yards (57m) apart and an adit. DC shaft was 16 ft (5m) dia and the haulage engine was at the top of the UC shaft in.

In 1885 an account of the haulage system states that the engine was made by Messrs Warsop and Hill of Nottingham. It had 2 horizontal cylinders 14½” dia with a 2’ 6” stroke, ordinary valves and a 1:3 gearing ratio giving a threefold increase of power to the second motion shaft.

An endless rope 1” dia of patent steel passing down the UC shaft transmits power to 3 endless rope haulages underground running underneath the tubs which are attached to the rope by short clips to the front of the tubs haulage singly at intervals of 15 yards (14m) to 20 yards (18m).

3 pulleys for working the haulages had claw clutches so that the rope could be put in and out of gear as required

Many old pits surrounded the mine including

  • Robinetts (drift position 43/4941/119962)
  • Balloon Houses shaft E450620, N340035)
  • Turkey Field (43/4542/886423 or SK49488642423)
  • Catstonehill E450100, N341090)
  • An old Cossall pit existed here in the 18th Century being owned and operated by Lord Middleton until 1805 when it was leased to Barber and Walker for a term of 21 years.
  • A map prepared by Michael Walker dated 1804 shows old workings taking place later in the 1830s and 1840s, therefore the lease was probably extended beyond the 21 years as stated.

Cuckoo pits 2 shafts sunk 14 yards (13m) and 15 yards (14m) located at Ilkeston junction to 1st Piper by Lynch and Cadogan pre 1870 and closed in May 1879.

Not much coal was worked for old workings were struck to the South.

The mine must have changed hands for when it was abandoned in December 1879 William Holding was Manager and Managing Director for Cossall Colliery Co.

The principal mineral owners were Lord Middleton of Wollaton Park and the Edge family of Strelley, some 1,500 acres between them.

When production finished, pumping of 1,000,000 gallons per week ceased within a few weeks on 11/12/1966 and salvage work was completed by June 1967 and the mine abandoned.

Manpower: Lynch and Cadogan 1870-1882, Cossall Colliery Co

  • 1946: 1894: Kilburn 437 u/g, 93 s/f, total 530 men
  • 1895: 577 men
  • 1900: 578 men
  • 1903: 527 men
  • 1905: 647 men
  • 1911: 538 men
  • 1913: 460 u/g, 109 s/f, 569 men
  • 1915: Kilburn and Tupton 470 men
  • 1920: 841 u/g, 182 s/f, total 1,023 men (max)
  • 1923: 669 men
  • 1925: 630 men
  • 1926: 534 men:
  • 1927: 596 men:
  • 1928: 580 men
  • 1929: 590 men:
  • 1930: 569 men
  • 1933: 555 men
  • 1935: Tupton 562 men
  • 1940: 652 men
  • 1945: 486 u/g, 187 s/f, 673.

Tonnage and Manpower NCB: No5 Area EMD:

  • 1947: 241,853 tons, 658 men
  • 1948: 273,295 tons, 656 men
  • 1949: 302,603 tons, 685 men
  • 1950: 230,720 tons, 677 men
  • 1951: 207,111 tons, 650 men
  • 1952: 264,913 tons, 676 men
  • 1953: 272,435 tons, 673 men
  • 1954: 256,681 tons, 636 men
  • 1955: 316,720 tons, 631 men
  • 1956: 416,769 tons, 866 men
  • 1957: 333,828 tons, 861 men
  • 1958: 353,739 tons, 845 men
  • 1959: 372,612 tons, 805 men
  • 1960: 333,511 tons, 777 men
  • 1961: 289,381 tons, 786 men
  • 1962: 328,582 tons, 813 men
  • 1963: 378,111tons, 802 men
  • 1963/64: 410,788 tons, 791 men
  • 1964/65: 406,969 tons, 791 men
  • 1965/66: 451,107 tons (max), 764 men
  • 1966/67: 151,171 tons, 558 men.
  • Colliery closed November 1966.

Maximum tonnage was 451,000 in 1965/66 and maximum manpower 487 underground and 186 surface (total 673) in 1945. The underground conditions were some of the worst in the region, being low and wet.

Agents:

  • William Holding (350 service cert) 1890-, appointed Managing Director
  • Alfred Hewlett Agent 1910-

Sub-Area Managers / Group Managers: No5 Area:

  • Jack H Pedley (2182) No3 Sub-Area Manager 1947-1951
  • Tommy Wright (3048) No3 Sub-Area Manager 1952-1955
  • S Sam Thornhill (3123) No3 Sub-Area Manager 1955-1956 and No3 Group Manager 1956-1957
  • Arthur Dennis (4207) No4 Group Manager 1957-1960 and No1 Group 1960-1964
  • George Cook (5472) No1 Group Manager 1964-1966
  • No5 Group Manager, No4 Area: Bas G Wright (5160) 1966

Managers for Cossall: for Cossall Colliery Co

  • William Holding (350 service cert) pre 1883-1890 to Agent 1890
  • Richard J Strick (1137) 1890-1895
  • WJ Hedley (1862) 1895-1897
  • ATC Savage (1137) 1897-1901
  • P Ratcliff (1604) 1901-1905 and for Trowell Moor also 1905-1913
  • G Brown 1913-1918
  • John Whyte (1892) 1918-1927
  • J Young (855) 1927-1928
  • Chas Houston (4043) 1928-1951
  • No5 Area: John Dow (3090) 1951-1952
  • Jim H Stone (4524) 1952-1954 (promoted from Wollaton, promoted to Sub-Area Manager, later CME, Deputy Director and Director)
  • Trevor T Allbrighton (3807) including Oakwood Grange from 11/10/1954 - Acting Manager Cossall 27/4/1957 - 1965 (transferred to New Hucknall)
  • Gerald Hartley (5838) 1965-1966
  • transferred to No4 Area
  • David Andrew Weir (6148) 1966, (promoted from Deputy Manager Ormonde, transferred to Agent Manager Babbington)
  • William E Bridges (3816) (transferred from Denby Drury Lowe at closure) 1966-1967

Undermanagers for Cossall:

  • James Holding (244 service cert) pre 1887-1903 (2nd class 297)
  • G Brown 1904-1905
  • Enoch Prime (2332) (from Manager Trowell Moor) 1905-1909
  • J Brown (2nd) 1909-1918
  • W Barlow (2nd) 1918-1923
  • W Stewart (2nd) 1923-1927
  • GH Taylor (2nd) 1927-1930
  • GW Hatton (2nd) 1930-1936
  • G Riley (555) 1936-1938
  • A Jarvis (2572) 1938-1946
  • WW Bennett (2nd) 1947-1951
  • Charlie W Dickens (4208) 1951-1953
  • Ronnie CH Hamilton (4441) 1953-1956
  • JM Ansell (5927) (Cossall) 1956-1963
  • Ian Pilbeam (2nd) (Oakwood Grange) 1957-1962
  • Jack Taylor (6363) (Cossall) 1958-1960
  • Albert Knight (7873) 1963-1966

Surveyors included:

  • George H Bond 1870s-
  • ...
  • Frank A Taylor (Surveyor to the Cossall Colliery Co Ltd) 1920s – 1930s
  • William (Bill) E Martin (1523) 1940s (to Area HQ, later No5 Area Chief Surveyor)
  • John G Tooley (2137 May 1949)
  • Denis Wardingley (2441) -1966 (transferred from Mapperley, then to South Nottinghamshire Area HQ)

Fatal Accidents Cossall:

  • Harry Watnough (30) boiler fell on him on the surface 22/1/1880
  • Jesse Mitchell (18) fall of coal 18/10/1882
  • William Robinson (55) fall of roof 29/8/1883
  • Joseph Webster (32) fall of roof 1/7/1884
  • John Dawson (59) fell from a wagon on the surface 4/7/1884
  • George Henry Staham (17) run over by tubs 12/5/1885
  • James Grafton (39) fall of roof 5/4/1887
  • Henry Bennett (41) fall of roof 24/11/1887
  • William Green (15) and William Horton (14) fall in a roadway
  • John Shipley (15) fall in a roadway 9/3/1891
  • Henry Saxton (19) fell from the cage down the shaft 7/10/1891
  • James Fahy (58) fall of roof 20/1/1891, died 4/5/1892
  • Sidney Conman (..?) 27/2/1892
  • Michael Moran (48) caught in machinery on surface 8/7/1892, died 24/7/1892
  • Sam Herbert Henson (22) crushed by tubs 20/7/1896
  • Jacob Wheatley (59) fall of roof 30/3/1896, died from a heart condition 4/2/1897
  • Robert Stenson (14) caught in machinery 12/2/1903
  • Charles Joseph Arnold (20) fall of roof 14/1/1904
  • William Fogg (60) fell off platform on the surface 24/9/1907, died 10/10/1907
  • William Beardsley (42) fall of coal 1/9/1901, died 21/9/1909
  • Joseph Cooley (17) run over by tubs 21/10/1910
  • Sam Cauldwell (49) fall of roof 2/11/1910
  • James Anglis (16) crushed by a pony 11/6/1913
  • Joseph Howe (42) fall of coal 16/8/1916
  • George Easom (31) fall of coal 17/10/1916
  • Herbert Hutchinson (20) electrocuted 19/1/1919
  • James Hewitt Hardy (56) run over by tubs 27/9/1920, died 20/10/1920
  • William Henry Sutterfield (39) and Frank Elliot (28) explosion of gas 6/3/1921
  • Joseph Charles Straw (17) fall in a roadway 4/9/1922
  • John Robert Fisher (62) fall of coal 31/12/1925
  • Edwin Orme (39) crushed by tubs 29/11/1927, died 30/11/1927
  • Herbert Rice (60) run over by tubs 8/5/1929, died 9/5/1929
  • John Walters (21) electrocuted 12/7/1929
  • Sam Oldknow (36) electrocuted 11/8/1930
  • William (Billy) Jepson (26) caught between two trucks - late 1930s
  • Arthur Wrigley Chambers (33) fall of roof 13/8/1930, died 24/1/1931
  • Arthur Cecil Smith (55) fall of roof 27/3/1931
  • William Charles Shepstone (36) run over by tubs 26/10/1931, died 24/12/1931
  • Walter Ernest Wood (48) electrocuted 2/12/1937
  • Owen Bostock (31) run over by tubs 14/4/1938
  • Colin Pugh (55) caught in machinery 21/11/1938
  • James Henry Shetliffe (25) fall of roof 11/9/1939
  • Francis West (18) electrocuted 2/8/1940
  • Thomas Palmer (37) fall of roof 5/7/1941
  • Charles William Green (48) fall of roof 26/8/1941
  • Albert William Dutton (53) kicked by a pony 20/9/1940, died 19/8/1941
  • Fred Bowley (33) fall of roof 17/5/1943
  • George Henry King (18) shotfiring accident 17/12/1945, died 19/12/1945
  • William James Drew (62) run over by tubs 14/11/1949, died 6/1/1950
  • Frank Melbourne (38) caught in a coal cutter 5/5/1956
  • Albert Meakin (35) fall of coal 29/1/1958, died 24/2/1958. Note there were 4 separate instances of a miner being electrocuted underground, not found at any other colliery.


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