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Calendar
The Decline Of The Industry
And Nationalisation 1947

Bk
Chimney
1938
1939
1941

1939 - Page 2


Tibshelf No3 and No4 (Top Pits) Closed 1939, after 69 years

Tibshelf No3 and No4 Top pits (Derbyshire) Sunk in 1893/94 by Charles Seely who sold out to Babbington Coal Co on 1 Apr 1936, subsequently taken over by BA Collieries Ltd, who in turn were bought out by the Sheepbridge Coal and Iron Co in 1939, who closed and abandoned the pit on 18th August 1939, after 69 years, so that production at their more modern mines could improve and increase production. No3 shaft 876ft 6in (267m) deep, No4 shaft 895ft 8in (273m) to Blackshale. No1 and No2 pits or Bottom pit, shown below, was closed in 1936 but pumping continued to protect the Top pit from being flooded.


No1 and No2 pits or Bottom pit

Seams worked:
Tupton Threequarters 2’ 4” (0.71m) –1927; Deep Hard (app 3’ 3” (1.0m) -1939, Tupton (Low Main) 5’ 2½” (1.59m) -1937, and Blackshale seam 3ft 6½in (1.08m) = tops 1’ 3½” (0.39m), dirt ½” (0.01m), tinkers 6½” (0.16m), dirt 1” (0.02m), bottoms 1’ 6” (0.46m) -1939. Shaft depth, 306 yards (280m) to sump. All abandoned 18 Aug 1939. Shaft positions E445070 N360965, E445095 N360930.

Manpower: Babbington Coal Co:

  • 1894: No3 / No4: 163 Deep Hard, Silkstone, 106 s/f
  • 1895: 274 DH, S, 96 s/f
  • 1896: No3: 11 T, 32 s/f, No4: 273 S, 65 s/f
  • 1897: No3: 259 T, 67 s/f, No4: 35 S, 30 s/f
  • 1898: No3: 60 T, 42 s/f, No4: 288 S, 65 s/f
  • 1899: No3: 130 T, 51 s/f, No4: 241 S, 69 s/f
  • 1900: No3: 285 S, 66 s/f, No4: 215 T, 69 s/f
  • 1901: No3: 318 S, 79 s/f, No4: 254 T, 68 s/f
  • 1902: No3: 321 S, 92 s/f, No4: 276 T, 75 s/f
  • 1903: No3: 321 S, 91 s/f, No4: 227 T, 72 s/f
  • 1904: No3: 305 S, 96 s/f, No4: 191 T, 73 s/f
  • 1905: No3: 255 S, 103 s/f, No4: 250 T, 74 s/f
  • 1906: No3: 308 S, 114 s/f, No4: 174 Deep Hard, Tupton, 78 s/f
  • 1907: No3: 251 S, 97 s/f, No4: 216 Deep Hard, Tupton, 66 s/f
  • 1908: No3: 343 DH, S, 97 s/f, No4: 264 DH, T, 73 s/f
  • 1909: No3: 373 DH, S, 99 s/f, No4: 343 DH, T, 78 s/f
  • 1910: No3: 365 DH, T, S, 98 s/f, No4: 350 DH, T, 50 s/f
  • 1911: No3: 360 DH, T, S, 94 s/f, No4: 360 DH, T, 21 s/f
  • 1912: No3: 359 DH, T, S, 83 s/f, No4: 387 DH, T, 79 s/f
  • 1913: No3: 334 T, S, No4: 349 DH, T, S, s/f 170
  • 1914: No3: 306 T, S, No4: 356 DH, T, S, 169 s/f
  • 1915: No3: 241 T, S, No4: 356 DH, T, S, 167 s/f
  • 1916: No3: 241 T, S, No4: 381 DH, T, S, 159 s/f
  • 1917: No3: 240 T, S, No4: 359 DH, T, S, 172 s/f
  • 1918: No3: 259 T, S, No4: 299 DH, T, S, 162 s/f
  • 1919: No3: 271 T, S, No4: 347 DH, T, S, 185 s/f
  • 1920: No3: 273 T, S, No4: 359 DH, T, S, 186 s/f
  • 1921: No3: 279 T, S, No4: 359 DH, T, S, 189 s/f
  • 1922: No3: 321 T, S, No4: 422 DH, (Tupton) Low Main, (Silkstone) Blackshale, 196 s/f
  • 1923: No3: 307, No4: 425 DH, LM, ¾, BS, 196 s/f
  • 1924: 690 DH, LM, ¾, BS, 204 s/f
  • 1925: 664 DH, LM, ¾, BS, 241 s/f
  • 1926: 541 DH, LM, ¾, BS, 177 s/f
  • 1927: 540 DH, LM, ¾, BS, 201 s/f
  • 1928: 611 DH, LM, ¾, BS, 196 s/f
  • 1929: 548 DH, LM, BS, 205 s/f
  • 1930: 548 DH, LM, BS, 205 s/f
  • 1931: 569 DH, LM, BS, 184 s/f
  • 1932: 652 DH, LM, BS, 204 s/f
  • 1933: 225 DH, LM, BS, 97 s/f
  • 1934: 361 DH, LM, BS, 118 s/f
  • 1935: 362 DH, LM, BS, 134 s/f
  • 1936: 416 LM, BS, 147 s/f
  • 1937: 351 H, LM, BS, 159 s/f
  • 1938: 383 H, LM, BS, 185 s/f
  • 1939:

Managers at Tibshelf No3 and No4:

  • Stewart Channer Wardell (506 service), Mining Engineer and Agent 1868-1898
  • William Maurice (1466) 1898-1902
  • Tom A Lawton (1161) 1903-1916, took over Tibshelf No1 and No2 also in 1911
  • John W Chambers (191) 1916-1932
  • Arthur Riley (365) 1921-1932 for No1 and No2
  • Tom O Wrightson (2952) for the new company as pumping Manager 1939-1942?
  • Agent Jack A Tankard (3946) 1939-1942.

Undermanagers:

  • JR Maddison 1893-1898
  • H Maddison 1898-1907
  • George Hill (2nd) No3 pit 1899-1908, transferred to No1 and No2 Bottom pit (he had started work aged 10 in 1870 at Tommy Newnes pit in the village, and had progressed through all aspects of mining to his present position)
  • JH Wain (2nd) 1908-1911
  • T Brealey (2nd) 1911-1917
  • George Riley (2nd) 1918-1932
  • HR Newbury (2nd) 1919-1922
  • Reuben Ball (2nd) 1922-1932
  • AE White (2nd)1934-1939
  • Walter Sharpe (2223) for both Top and Bottom pits 1932-1934
  • HS Cockerill (2nd)1939-1942.

Assistant Manager Nos 3 and No4 Tom A Lawton (1161) (promoted to Manager).

Underground Manager Blackshale, George Rawson (2nd).
Underground Manager Hard coal: T Walters (2nd).
Underground Manager No4, then No3: George Hill (2nd) 1899 -1908.
Underground Manager Low Main: R Coupe (2nd).

Surveyors included:

  • John Merriman 1920s
  • Arthur Haydn Booth (300) 1930s.

Fatal Accidents at Tibshelf

  • William Tomlinson (45) 6 Apr 1867, shaft accident
  • Thomas Holloway (21) 9 Jun 1870
  • Thomas Marsh (24) 18 Mar 1873
  • Thomas Stapleton (23) 1 Aug 1873
  • Charles Bellamy (22) 20 Jan 1875
  • Samuel Ealing (33) 10 Jan 1884
  • Andrew Limb (..?) . Apr 1895
  • William Wood (14) 11 Nov 1895
  • Charles Revill (20) Pony driver. Drowned in pit reservoir 01-Aug-1896
  • Enoch Davies and Walter Machin (..?) . Jan 1897
  • George Clark (..?) 9 Aug 1900
  • William Brough (..?) 20 Sep 1901
  • George Pickin (35) 9 Mar 1903
  • John Dudley (62) 22 May 1903
  • William Holling (31) killed in an explosion 16 Feb 1908
  • Thomas Tomlinson (16) 2 Oct 1912
  • Charles Riley (69) 25 Apr 1915
  • George Wilbourne (58) 4 May 1916
  • Joseph Hill (35) 15 Sep 1916
  • John Rawson (58) 1 May 1917
  • James Killgannon (55) 3 May 1918
  • John Jos Clarke (18) 4 Mar 1920
  • Tom Bonser (15) 6 Jul 1922
  • Samuel Pearce (30) 17 Jan 1924
  • Henry Haynes (42) 16 Aug 1924
  • Walter Weaver (31) 24 Apr 1926
  • George Pearce (?) 12 May 1927
  • Frank Alsop (22) 8 Dec 1927, jumped down shaft
  • German Buxton (53) 3 Dec 1931
  • George Henry Brook (36) Jan 1933
  • Tom Gower (43) 28 Aug 1933
  • Harry Smith (59), 31 Oct 1934 - clay pit connected with Tibshelf Nos.3 and 4 Collieries, about half a ton of clay fall onto him.

Up to 20 old collieries were located in the Tibshelf area and had closed earlier. Quaint names like

  • Back Lane
  • Drum and Monkey or Old pit
  • Dunbags (‘Volty Dumbags’)
  • Forecroft (or Forecourt) / Spaw Croft 35 yards (32m) deep
  • Tommy Newnes’ (or ‘Newnies’)
  • Twentyman
  • Winkin Lane / New Close to name a few. The Cocktop pits lay to north of the village towards Hardstoft. A cupola and sough lay to the south and Diminsdale or ‘Dimsdale’ (local name) to the east of the village. A horse tramway led from several of these old pits to a coal wharf situated at Tibshelf Ramper.

Company Areas

Area 1 comprised:

  • Blackwell Colliery Co Ltd
  • Clay Cross Co Ltd and Wingfield Manor Colliery Co Ltd
  • Grassmoor Colliery Co Ltd
  • Hardwick Colliery Co Ltd
  • New Hucknall Colliery Co Ltd
  • Pilsley Colliery Co Ltd
  • Pinxton Collieries Ltd
  • South Normanton Colliery Co Ltd, Stanton Ironworks Co Ltd.

Area 2:

  • Butterley Co Ltd or Barber, Walker and Co Ltd should acquire their smaller neighbours including James Oakes (Riddings Collieries) Ltd
  • RCA Palmer Morewood
  • Pentrich Colliery Co Ltd
  • JAE Drury Lowe.

Area 3:

  • BA Collieries Ltd
  • Cossall Colliery Co Ltd
  • Nottingham and Clifton Colliery Co Ltd
  • Shipley Collieries Ltd and Ilkeston Collieries Ltd
  • Wollaton Collieries Ltd.

In the Northern part:

  • J and G Wells Ltd
  • Oxcroft Colliery Co Ltd
  • Tinsley Park Colliery Co Ltd (largest).

Many Miners Enlisted

In the first few months of the War with Germany the manpower would begin to fall as many miners enlisted in the forces. It was the younger men that left and the average age of miners increased dramatically and in doing so the national output per manshift decreased and Sunday working was encouraged at some pits albeit that there were no overtime rates at the time, just a normal day's pay. (see overtime 1944).


Output

There were 1,995 mines in the country with an output of 240 million tons and 14,000 mine management staff.
Just 22 companies produced two thirds of the total coal output.

In 1939 there were 124 colliery undertakings in Nottinghamshire, North Derbyshire and South Derbyshire producing 62.75m tons.

Nottinghamshire 16.7m tons, 41 pits using 349 coal cutters, 36 pits using 568 conveyors, 96 loaders.
North Derbyshire
13.9m tons, with 53 pits using 485 coal cutters, 44 pits using 556 conveyors and 79 loaders
South Derbyshire 884,000 tons, 7 pits using 46 coal cutters, 6 pits using 51 conveyors, 4 loaders.
Leicestershire 2.75 m tons, 12 pits using 118 coal cutters, 12 pits using 133 conveyors, 32 loaders.

 

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1940
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