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Plan to demolish Gorebridge homes after carbon dioxide gas leak


Officials are recommending all 64 homes on Gorebridge's Newbyres Crescent estate are flattened
Scotland



Plan to demolish Gorebridge homes after carbon dioxide gas leak
12 June 2014

Officials are recommending all 64 homes on Gorebridge's Newbyres Crescent estate are flattened before a special gas membrane is installed at the site

Houses built on a former Midlothian coal mine are set to be demolished after carbon dioxide was discovered seeping into the properties.

Officials are recommending all 64 homes on Gorebridge's Newbyres Crescent estate are flattened before a special gas membrane is installed at the site.

The plan is then to rebuild the development.

Councillors are due to make a decision on the recommendations at a council meeting on Tuesday.

If the proposals get the go ahead then residents in the council estate would be relocated for up to six months.

The £6m development was built eight years ago. It has been estimated that to build a new development would cost £12m.

The problem first came to light when a family had difficulty waking teenagers sleeping in one of the homes on the site last September.

A Midlothian Council spokesman said: "We are exploring a number of options, and this work will accelerate once the detail around the final choice on what work will be happening is clear."


Inquiry call as gas leak homes face demolition
Friday 13 June 2014

COUNCIL chiefs have called for a public inquiry to find out who is responsible for a potentially deadly gas leak which caused dozens of families to lose their homes.

The £6million development in Newbyres Crescent, Gorebridge, faces being pulled down amid fears of carbon dioxide leaking into homes from old coal mines.

Council chiefs now plan to demolish the 64 houses, built just eight years ago, and rebuild them from scratch at a cost of £12 million, or sell off the cleared land entirely.

Six people have been hospitalised since the problem emerged in September, and five families have been permanently evacuated.

Midlothian Council leader Owen Thompson said: "We as a council don't have the authority to call for a public inquiry. But we have written to Health Secretary Alex Neil and the chairman of NHS Lothian, Brian Houston, because the first priority has been to make it safe for residents.

"But now it's appropriate to look at how did this happen? There are some questions about that and we don't know the answers."

Midlothian Council has asked the Scottish Government to investigate why the houses were not fitted with protective gas membranes.

Housebuilder Lovell insisted it followed instructions from the council's design team.


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