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From: Lee Alexander
Sent: 17 September 2008
Subject: Great Western Colliery, Hetty Pit

Hi there
I took the attached picture a while ago and want to put a label on it but I’m not able to as I’m not exactly sure what it is. I have a feeling it's Hetty Pit but when comparing it with the picture on your website, there are very slight differences, although it is very similar. If you could take a look at the picture and give me your opinion, I’d very much appreciate it. Thanks!!

Lee Alexander


Is This The Hetty Shaft?


Hetty Pit?

See Stuart Tomlins Collection of Mining Pictures


I am sure your photo (above) is the Hetty Shaft

Detail

Detail
Detail

Great Western Colliery, now as an abandoned mine at Hopkinstown, a mile or two up the Rhondda Valley from Pontypridd. The shaft is known as the Hetty shaft. The Hetty was the downcast and was sunk to the Six Feet Seam and was 398 yards deep. At the Hetty the Four Feet and Six feet Seams were worked. Both the Hetty and the No.2 Pits had been safely worked since 1877 when the shafts were first sunk to the steam coal measures.


This is what the Hetty Shaft used to look like in its hay day


Hetty


An underground fire occurred at the Great Western Colliery on the 11th of April 1893.

Sparks from the wooden break blocks of a haulage engine set fire to nearby brattice sheets.
The fire spread quickly, fanned by the strong ventilation to ignite timber supports
sending dense clouds of smoke and fumes into the mines workings.
The death tally would have been much greater if it wasn't for the
brave action of the district fireman, Thomas Prosser, who ventured into the dense smoke
and by opening a set of air doors he diverted the noxious fumes out of the mine.
63 lost their lives.
The Disaster


Adolphus Dodge
14
doorboy.
Albert Pearce
16
collier.
Amazia Jones
15
collier.
Arthur Davies
33
collier.
Arthur Thorne
16
collier.
Charles Coville
50
collier.
Charles Godfrey
28
collier.
Coleman Williams
17
haulier.
Cornelius Hayes
18
oiler.
Daniel David
17
collier.
Daniel O’Shea
16
collier.
Daniel Spooner
35
haulier.
David Davies
29
fireman.
David Jenkins
31
collier.
David John
17
collier.
David John Powell
13
collier.
David W. Prosser
17
collier.
Ernest Thomas Prosser
18
collier.
Frank Grainger
28
inclineman.
Frederick Nurse
16
collier.
George Bartlett
23
collier.
George C. Lewis
15
collier.
George Roderick
14
collier.
George Thorne
31
collier.
Gwilym Howells
17
collier.
Ivor Lloyd
22
collier.
James Devereux
39
lampman.
James Holbrook
25
collier.
Jesse Titley
19
collier.
Job Miller
18
collier.
John Llewelyn
45
collier.
John Maddox
33
collier.
John Nichols
26
engineman.
John Roberts
21
collier.
John Thomas
27
collier.
John Williams
31
collier.
John Williams
61
labourer.
Joseph Williams
37
collier.
Lewis Jacob
20
collier.
Lewis Thomas
25
haulier.
Lewis Williams
26
collier.
Mark Osborne
26
collier.
Morgan Williams
57
collier.
Morris Potter
28
collier.
Patsey Sullivan
-
rider
Phillip Jones
42
collier.
Richard Edmunds
25
collier.
Thomas Davies
29
bratticeman.
Thomas Henry Williams
17
collier.
Thomas Lambert
27
rider.
Thomas Price
15
doorboy.
Wiliam Lewis
44
collier.
William Bowers
22
collier.
William C. Balling
21
collier.
William Davies
17
collier.
William Edmunds
52
roadman.
William Hughes
17
collier.
William James Bond
16
collier.
William John
42
collier.
William Thomas
18
collier.
William Thomas Cole or Vole
16
collier.
William Wheeler
16
collier.
William Williams
20
collier.

The Disaster

Pit Terminology - Glossary


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